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Andrew J. Szeri

Abstract

No abstract available

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T. D. Sikora
,
G. S. Young
,
R. C. Beal
, and
J. B. Edson

Abstract

Two distinct backscatter regimes are seen on a European remote sensing satellite ERS-1 C-band (5.6 cm) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image of the sea surface during a time of fair synoptic-scale weather conditions. One backscatter regime is mottled. In contrast to that, the second backscatter regime is marbled.

The authors hypothesize that the mottled backscatter pattern is a characteristic SAR backscatter pattern linked to the presence of the convective (i.e., statically unstable/convective-eddy containing) marine atmospheric boundary layer (CMABL) and can be used to help determine CMABL structure [convective-eddy type (cellular convection versus longitudinal rolls), eddy wavelength, and CMABL depth (via mixed-layer similarity theory for aspect ratio)]. The hypothesis linking the presence and structure of the CMABL to the mottled backscatter pattern on SAR imagery is validated by analyzing data from a number of sources gathered in the vicinity of the boundary between the mottled and marbled regimes on the SAR image.

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Mark A. Lander

Abstract

No abstract available

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Howard B. Bluestein

Abstract

Photographic evidence is presented of funnel clouds pendant from the bases of convective clouds whose updrafts appear to be rooted well above the boundary layer. These funnel clouds occur in environments supportive of severe convective storms, under dissipating cumulus humilis, cumulus congestus, and low-precipitation cumulonimbus, and on the rear side of supercell and multicell convective storms. Since these funnel clouds do not become tornadoes, spotters should learn to distinguish them from the potentially tornadic funnel clouds that occur under convective clouds that are rooted in the boundary layer.

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Walter A. Lyons

Abstract

No abstracts available

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Otha H. Vaughan Jr.
,
Richard Blakeslee
,
William L. Boeck
,
Bernard Vonnegut
,
Marx Brook
, and
Jorn McKune Jr.

Abstract

No abstract available.

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Vincent T. Wood

Abstract

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Mark Ruminski

Abstract

The unusual concurrent development of two strong tropical cyclones in the southeast Pacific during February 1989 is seen from GOES 7 satellite imagery. A review of past tropical cyclone activity in the region is presented which shows that these storms were rare in several aspects. An analysis of mean weather conditions is conducted and indicates that a deep layer easterly wind anomaly with reduced vertical wind shear coupled with warmer than nonnal sea surface temperatures were important contributing factors in the storms' development.

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Eugene W. McCaul Jr.
and
David O. Blanchard

Abstract

An unusual low-precipitation cumulonimbus that developed in northeastern Colorado is photographically documented in some detail. The storm produced at least 12 funnels, mostly at midlevels on the north side of the main updraft. The base of the cloud consisted of a lenticular “bell” that rotated cyclonically, while a couplet of counterrotating storm-scale eddies prevailed aloft. The funnels originated in a region of enhanced shear between easterly low-level flow on the north side of the bell and westerly flow aloft on the north side of a midlevel anticyclonic eddy.

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Howard B. Bluestein

Abstract

No abstract available.

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