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Jan Svejkovsky

Abstract

Strong mountain downslope winds over southern California known as “Santa Ana” bring dry inland air through the coastal region, posing a serious wildfire hazard. Between 26 and 30 November 1980 several large brushfires raged out of control south of Los Angeles. The smoke plume from the fires was visible in NOAA 6 AVHRR images and was used to trace the seaward extent of the Santa Ana influence. The smoke followed the 700 mb air flow pattern and was detectable in the images up to 1100 km from its source.

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Clifford F. Mass
and
David P. Dempsey

Abstract

No abstract available.

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Stanley Q. Kidder
and
Huey-Tzu Wu

Abstract

No abstract available.

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P. B. Landecker

Abstract

No abstract available.

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Howard B. Bluestein

Abstract

The characteristics and environment of low-precipitation severe thunderstorms in the Southern Plains have been summarized by Bluestein and Parks in 1983. Photographic documentation is given here of several storms not previously shown.

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M. E. Voice
and
F. J. Gauntlett

Abstract

Australia experienced the most disastrous bushfires in over 40 years on Ash Wednesday, 16 February 1983. This article describes the meteorological conditions prior to, during and after these fires, and includes photographs from GMS-2. It also discusses simple manual trajectory analyses which indicate the movement of the respective air masses, and the atmospheric effect of particulates.

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Gregory S. Forbes
and
Jonathan H. Merritt

Abstract

The occasional occurrence of wintertime mesoscale lake vortices is documented. The vortices are readily discernible in satellite imagery, in which they take one of three forms: a miniature comma cloud, a swirl of cloud bands (resembling a miniature tropical storm) or a swirl of cloud streets. Despite their impressive appearance in satellite imagery, these vortices are usually relatively mild in comparison with other lake-effect storms and produce only gusty winds and brief snow squalls as they move onshore. The vortices are accompanied by a slightly lowered surface pressure and a weak cyclonic low-level wind circulation.

Fourteen vortices were detected over the Great Lakes in the years 1978–82; they occurred under conditions of relatively weak surface pressure gradient, with a ridge of high pressure usually found over or west of the region. Convergence was generally detected in the surface winds prior to vortex development, apparently related to land breeze circulations. Comparisons are made between the conditions favoring the occurrence of shoreline-parallel cloud bands and lake vortices. Comparisons are also made between lake vortices and polar vortices and i.e., mesoscale vortices occurring in polar airstreams over oceans.

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William L. Read
and
Robert A. Maddox

Abstract

No abstract available.

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Von S. Woods

Abstract

Satellite imagery is used to document several rope clouds over the southeastern Unites States. Surface and upper-air data are examined for one of the rope clouds and possible reasons for the development and maintenance of this type cloud line are considered.

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Frances C. Parmenter-Holt

Abstract

No abstract available.

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