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J. V. Ratnam, Masami Nonaka, and Swadhin K. Behera

Abstract

The machine learning technique, namely artificial neural networks (ANN), is used to predict the surface air temperature (SAT) anomalies over Japan in the winter months of December, January, and February for the period 1949/50–2019/20. The predictions are made for the four regions Hokkaido, North, Central, and West of Japan. The inputs to the ANN model are derived from the anomaly correlation coefficients among the SAT anomalies over the regions of Japan and the global SAT and sea surface temperature anomalies. The results are validated using anomaly correlation coefficient (ACC) skill scores with the observation. It is found that the ANN predictions over Hokkaido have higher ACC skill scores compared to the ACC scores over the other three regions. The ANN-predicted SAT anomalies are compared with that of ensemble mean of eight of the North American Multimodel Ensemble (NMME) models besides comparing them with the persistent anomalies. The ANN predictions over all the four regions have higher ACC skill scores compared to the NMME model skill scores in the common period of 1982/83–2018/19. The ANN-predicted SAT anomalies also have higher hit rate and lower false alarm rate compared to the NMME-predicted SAT anomalies. All these indicate that the ANN model is a promising tool for predicting the winter SAT anomalies over Japan.

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Michelle L. L'Heureux, Michael K. Tippett, and Emily J. Becker

Abstract

The relation between the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and California precipitation has been studied extensively and plays a prominent role in seasonal forecasting. However, a wide range of precipitation outcomes on seasonal timescales are possible, even during extreme ENSO states. Here, we investigate prediction skill and its origins on subseasonal timescales. Model predictions of California precipitation are examined using Subseasonal Experiment (SubX) reforecasts for the period 1999–2016, focusing on those from the Flow-Following Icosahedral Model (FIM). Two potential sources of subseasonal predictability are examined: the tropical Pacific Ocean and upper-level zonal winds near California. In both observations and forecasts, the Niño-3.4 index exhibits a weak and insignificant relationship with daily to monthly averages of California precipitation. Likewise, model tropical sea surface temperature and outgoing longwave radiation show only minimal relations with California precipitation forecasts, providing no evidence that flavors of El Niño or tropical modes substantially contribute to the success or failure of subseasonal forecasts. On the other hand, an index for upper-level zonal winds is strongly correlated with precipitation in observations and forecasts, across averaging windows and lead times. The wind index is related to ENSO, but the correlation between the wind index and precipitation remains even after accounting for ENSO phase. Intriguingly, the Niño 3.4 index and California precipitation show a slight but robust negative statistical relation after accounting for the wind index.

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Charles R. Sampson, Efren A. Serra, John A. Knaff, and Joshua H. Cossuth

Abstract

The U.S. Navy is keenly interested in analyses and predictions of waves at sea due to their effects on important tasks such as shipping, base preparedness and disaster relief. U.S. Tropical Cyclone (TC) Forecast Centers routinely disseminate wind probabilities consistent with official TC forecasts worldwide, but do not do the same for wave forecasts. These probabilities are especially important at longer leads where TC forecast accuracy diminishes. This work describes global wave probabilities consistent with both the official TC forecasts and their wind probabilities. Real-time runs for 84 TCs between May 2018 and March 2019, with probabilities generated for 12-ft and 18-ft significant wave heights are used to calculate verification statistics. This results in 347, 319, 261, 214, 155, and 112 verification cases at lead times of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days where each verification case consists of a 20x20 degree latitude longitude grid around the verifying TC position. When compared with wave probabilities generated solely by a global numerical weather prediction model, the wind probability-based algorithm demonstrates improved consistency with official forecasts and provides additional benefits. Those benefits include an improved capability to discriminate between 12-ft and 18-ft significant wave events and non-events. The verification statistics also shows that the wind probability-based algorithm has a consistent high bias. How these biases can be reduced in future efforts is also discussed.

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Branden Katona and Paul Markowski

Abstract

Storms crossing complex terrain can potentially encounter rapidly changing convective environments. However, our understanding of terrain-induced variability in convective storm environments remains limited. HRRR data are used to create climatologies of popular convective storm forecasting parameters for different wind regimes. Self-organizing maps (SOMs) are used to generate six different low-level wind regimes, characterized by different wind directions, for which popular instability and vertical wind shear parameters are averaged. The climatologies show that both instability and vertical wind shear are highly variable in regions of complex terrain, and that the spatial distributions of perturbations relative to the terrain are dependent on the low-level wind direction. Idealized simulations are used to investigate the origins of some of the perturbations seen in the SOM climatologies. The idealized simulations replicate many of the features in the SOM climatologies, which facilitates analysis of their dynamical origins. Terrain influences are greatest when winds are approximately perpendicular to the terrain. In such cases, a standing wave can develop in the lee, leading to an increase in low-level wind speed and a reduction in vertical wind shear with the valley lee of the plateau. Additionally, CAPE tends to be decreased and LCL heights are increased in the lee of the terrain where relative humidity within the boundary layer is locally decreased.

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William R. Burrows and Curtis J. Mooney

Abstract

Blizzard conditions occur regularly in the Canadian Arctic, with high impact on travel and life there. These extreme conditions are challenging to forecast for this vast domain because the observation network is sparse and remote sensing coverage is limited. To establish occurrence statistics we analyzed aviation routine weather reports (METARs) from Canadian Arctic stations between October and May 2014–18. Blizzard conditions occur most frequently in open tundra east and north of the boreal forest boundary, with the highest frequency found on the northwest side of Hudson Bay and over flat terrain in central Baffin Island. Except in sheltered locations, the reported cause of reduced visibility is blowing snow without precipitating snow in about one-half to two-thirds of METARs made by a human observer, even higher at some stations. We produce three products that forecast blizzard conditions from postprocessed NWP model output. The blizzard potential (BP), generated from expert’s rules, is intended for warning well in advance of areas where blizzard conditions may develop. A second product (BH) stems from regression equations for the probability of visibility ≤ 1 km in blowing snow and/or concurrent snow derived by Baggaley and Hanesiak. A third product (RF), generated with the random forest ensemble classification algorithm, makes a consensus YES/NO forecast for blizzard conditions. We describe the products, provide verification, and show forecasts for a significant blizzard event. Receiver operator characteristic curves and critical success index scores show RF forecasts have greater accuracy than BP and BH forecasts at all lead times.

Open access
P. Schaumann, R. Hess, M. Rempel, U. Blahak, and V. Schmidt

Abstract

The seamless combination of nowcasting and numerical weather prediction (NWP) aims to provide a functional basis for very-short-term forecasts, which are essential (e.g., for weather warnings). In this paper we propose a statistical method for precipitation using neural networks (NN) that combines nowcasting data from DWD’s radar-based RadVOR system with postprocessed forecasts of the high resolving NWP ensemble COSMO-DE-EPS. The postprocessing is performed by Ensemble-MOS of DWD. Whereas the quality of the nowcasting projections of RadVOR is excellent at the beginning, it declines rapidly after about 2 h. The postprocessed forecasts of COSMO-DE-EPS in contrast start with lower accuracy but provide meaningful information on longer forecast ranges. The combination of the two systems is performed for probabilities that the expected precipitation amounts exceed a series of predefined thresholds. The resulting probabilistic forecasts are calibrated and outperform both input systems in terms of accuracy for forecast ranges from 1 to 6 h as shown by verification. The proposed NN-model generalizes a previous statistical model based on extended logistic regression, which was restricted to only one threshold of 0.1 mm. The various layers of the NN-model are related to the conventional design elements (e.g., triangular functions and interaction terms) of the previous model for easier insight.

Open access
Samuel M. Bartlett and Jason M. Cordeira

Abstract

Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are synoptic-scale phenomena associated with long, narrow corridors of enhanced low-level water vapor transport. Landfalling ARs may produce numerous beneficial (e.g., drought amelioration and watershed recharge) and hazardous (e.g., flash flooding and heavy snow) impacts that may require the National Weather Service (NWS) to issue watches, warnings, and advisories (WWAs). Prior research on WWAs and ARs in California found that 50%–70% of days with flood-related and 60%–80% of days with winter weather–related WWAs occurred on days with landfalling ARs in California. The present study further investigates this relationship for landfalling ARs and WWAs during the cool seasons of 2006–18 across the entire western United States and considers additional dimensions of AR intensity and duration. Across the western United States, regional maxima of 70%–90% of days with WWAs issued for any hazard type were associated with landfalling ARs. In the Pacific Northwest and central regions, flood-related and wind-related WWAs were also more frequently associated with more intense and longer-duration ARs. While a large majority of days with WWAs were associated with landfalling ARs, not all landfalling ARs were necessarily associated with WWAs (i.e., not all ARs are hazardous). For example, regional maxima of only 50%–70% of AR days were associated with WWAs issued for any hazard type. However, as landfalling AR intensity and duration increased, the association with a WWA and the “hazard footprint” of WWAs increased quasi-exponentially across the western United States.

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Jeremiah O. Piersante, Russ. S. Schumacher, and Kristen L. Rasmussen

Abstract

Ensemble forecasts using the WRF Model at 20-km grid spacing with varying parameterizations are used to investigate and compare precipitation and atmospheric profile forecast biases in North and South America. By verifying a 19-member ensemble against NCEP Stage-IV precipitation analyses, it is shown that the cumulus parameterization (CP), in addition to precipitation amount and season, had the largest influence on precipitation forecast skill in North America during 2016–17. Verification of an ensemble subset against operational radiosondes in North and South America finds that forecasts in both continents feature a substantial midlevel dry bias, particularly at 700 hPa, during the warm season. Case-by-case analysis suggests that large midlevel error is associated with mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) east of the high terrain and westerly subsident flow from the Rocky and Andes Mountains in North and South America. However, error in South America is consistently greater than North America. This is likely attributed to the complex terrain and higher average altitude of the Andes relative to the Rockies, which allow for a deeper low-level jet and long-lasting MCSs, both of which 20-km simulations struggle to resolve. In the wake of data availability from the RELAMPAGO field campaign, the authors hope that this work motivates further comparison of large precipitating systems in North and South America, given their high impact in both continents.

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Akshay Deoras, Kieran M. R. Hunt, and Andrew G. Turner

Abstract

This study analyzes the prediction of Indian monsoon low pressure systems (LPSs) on an extended time scale of 15 days by models of the Subseasonal-to-Seasonal (S2S) prediction project. Using a feature-tracking algorithm, LPSs are identified in 11 S2S models during a common reforecast period of June–September 1999–2010, and then compared with 290 and 281 LPSs tracked in ERA-Interim and MERRA-2 reanalysis datasets. The results show that all S2S models underestimate the frequency of LPSs. They are able to represent transits, genesis, and lysis of LPSs; however, large biases are observed in the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, China Meteorological Administration (CMA), and Hydrometeorological Centre of Russia (HMCR) models. The CMA model exhibits large LPS track position error and the intensity of LPSs is overestimated (underestimated) by most models when verified against ERA-Interim (MERRA-2). The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts and Met Office models have the best ensemble spread–error relationship for the track position and intensity, whereas the HMCR model has the worst. Most S2S models are underdispersive—more so for the intensity than the position. We find the influence of errors in the LPS simulation on the pattern of total precipitation biases in all S2S models. In most models, precipitation biases increase with forecast lead time over most of the monsoon core zone. These results demonstrate the potential for S2S models at simulating LPSs, thereby giving the possibility of improved disaster preparedness and water resources planning.

Open access
Zhaolu Hou, Jianping Li, and Bin Zuo

Abstract

Numerical seasonal forecasts in Earth science always contain forecast errors that cannot be eliminated by improving the ability of the numerical model. Therefore, correction of model forecast results is required. Analog correction is an effective way to reduce model forecast errors, but the key question is how to locate analogs. In this paper, we updated the local dynamical analog (LDA) algorithm to find analogs and depicted the process of model error correction as the LDA correction scheme. The LDA correction scheme was first applied to correct the operational seasonal forecasts of sea surface temperature (SST) over the period 1982–2018 from the state-of-the-art coupled climate model named NCEP Climate Forecast System, version 2. The results demonstrated that the LDA correction scheme improves forecast skill in many regions as measured by the correlation coefficient and root-mean-square error, especially over the extratropical eastern Pacific and tropical Pacific, where the model has high simulation ability. El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) as the focused physics process is also improved. The seasonal predictability barrier of ENSO is in remission, and the forecast skill of central Pacific ENSO also increases due to the LDA correction method. The intensity of the ENSO mature phases is improved. Meanwhile, the ensemble forecast results are corrected, which proves the positive influence from this LDA correction scheme on the probability forecast of cold and warm events. Overall, the LDA correction scheme, combining statistical and model dynamical information, is demonstrated to be readily integrable with other advanced operational models and has the capability to improve forecast results.

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