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Joseph H. Golden

Abstract

No abstract available.

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Patrick J. Michaels

Abstract

GOES imagery from 7 September 1981 shows five tropical disturbances in various stages of development. While the photo appears to indicate that they may be recurving under the influence of a persistent weakness in the subtropical ridge, analyses show that two were probably deflected northeastward by separate short waves in the upper troposphere. A slight change in amplitude or position of those waves or of the ridge could have resulted in unusually frequent activity on the U.S. Atlantic Coast.

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Aylmer H. Thompson

Abstract

No abstract available.

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Robert F. Adler
,
Douglas D. Fenn
, and
Douglas A. Moore

Abstract

A dark, spiral feature is noted in the geosynchronous satellite visible image of the top of a thunderstorm which also has a Deppler radar-observed mesocyclone. Although the evidence is not conclusive, the feature may represent cyclonic rotation at cloud top associated with the pre-tornado mesocyclone.

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P. Krishna Rao

Abstract

No abstract available.

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Andrew J. Negri
and
K. Robert Morris

Abstract

A narrow cloud-free zone of large longitudinal extent was observed in visible and infrared satellite imagery on 21 September 1978. An attempt to explain the zone in terms of subsidence induced by a transverse frontal circulation is presented.

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Greg J. Holland
and
Thomas D. Keenan

Abstract

not available

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Robert A. Maddox
and
David W. Reynolds

Abstract

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) enhanced infrared (IR) imagery depicted very cold temperatures over Colorado on the morning of 8 December 1978. The situation was unusual because skies were clear and the cold temperatures were not associated with high cloud tops. Instead, satellite data mapped large areas that were experiencing extremely cold surface temperatures. The GOES data were also examined using the Colorado State University interactive data processing system and it was found that the cold IR readings corresponded well with early morning low temperatures over the state. GOES data can be of use in monitoring surface temperatures and can, in certain situations, provide detailed spatial and temporal information over regions experiencing extreme temperatures.

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