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David A. R. Kristovich

Since 1962, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) has had a journal dedicated to utilizing meteorological and climatological information to help solve some of society’s greatest challenges. This editorial is to celebrate a noteworthy anniversary of the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology (JAMC).

Sixty years ago, the Journal of Applied Meteorology was launched by AMS, providing an avenue for publishing scientific research “with the application of the atmospheric sciences to operational and practical goals” Hilst (1969). Since its inception, this journal has had slightly varying names, signifying expansion of the scientific community

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David M. Schultz, Timothy M. DelSole, Robert M. Rauber, and Walter A. Robinson

All American Meteorological Society (AMS) journals now accept review articles. During its May 2017 meeting, the AMS Publications Commission approved a motion that all AMS journals encourage the publication of Reviews. Reviews are articles, focused on a specific topic, that synthesize previous research accomplishments, summarize the state of the science, and suggest avenues for future research. Reviews can be valuable additions to the AMS suite of publications, being often-read articles on a specialized topic that are readable for a more general audience than research articles. This Editorial describes the purpose, content, and the process of Reviews.

The purpose of a

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Robert M. Rauber

Expedited Contributions (ECs) have been a feature of American Meteorological Society (AMS) journals for six years. The twin goals of ECs when they were established were to reduce the time from submission to publication of research papers and to encourage authors to develop short, concise contributions to the journals. When ECs were created, the time to initial decision was nearly 80 days, and the production time (the time between acceptance and appearance online in final form) was approximately 160 days.

Since then, the time to initial decision has been reduced to 60 days, and also the production time has decreased

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Robert M. Rauber

Beginning with the January 2017 issues of American Meteorological Society (AMS) journals, the embargo period for journal content will be reduced from two years to one year. Executive Director Keith Seitter’s column in the December 2016 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) provides the rationale for this change and is summarized below.

The mandate from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in 2013 laid out the goal for federal funding agencies to develop a plan to support increased public access to the results of federally funded research. For

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Greg M. McFarquhar and Robert M. Rauber

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce the new approach the American Meteorological Society (AMS) has taken with Meteorological Monographs and to distinguish them from the special collections of journal articles. Moreover, whereas Meteorological Monographs were previously published like traditional hardbound books, henceforth they will be entirely open access and online, in addition to being available in print.

Goals of Meteorological Monographs

The AMS Meteorological Monographs series will consist of collections of review papers on topics in which rapid developments are currently being made, as well as collections of papers summarizing state-of-the-art knowledge (e.g., from recent special topical meetings).

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Matthew S. Mayernik, Mohan K. Ramamurthy, and Robert M. Rauber

On 25 February 2015, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) posted in the AMS author guidelines a new set of recommendations for AMS journals titled, “Data Archiving and Citation.” These recommendations promote the archiving of data related to papers published in AMS journals and provide guidelines for how such data should be cited within AMS papers (http://www.ametsoc.org/PubsDataPolicy).

The AMS academic, government, and commercial sectors rely on the production, management, and distribution of data related to environmental phenomena. In the policy statement, “Full and Open Access to Data,” adopted by the AMS Council in December 2013, AMS affirmed its commitment

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David M. Schultz, Robert M. Rauber, and Kenneth F. Heideman

One of the foundations of science is that published work be an original contribution by the named author or authors. As global science grows, more authors are encouraged to publish, more papers are being published, and the pressure to publish increases. Authors submitting manuscripts to the journals of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) must confirm to AMS that the work has not been published in other journals. As a requirement to enter peer review, authors also should have read and accepted the conditions of “Author Disclosure and Obligations” at www.ametsoc.org/PUBSAuthorObligations. Items 5–7 discuss plagiarism, self-plagiarism, and fragmentation and

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Kenneth F. Heideman

The evolution of atmospheric, hydrologic, and oceanic sciences toward increasingly model-based studies and comparisons, many times carried out or administered by institutions and organizations, is reflected in the publications of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). Model, institutional, and program acronyms are ubiquitous, and the longtime AMS style practice of expanding all acronyms can lead to unwieldy paragraphs, long captions, and cluttered tables that delay the editing process and sometimes cause author/reader dissatisfaction. To address this concern, AMS will now maintain acronym reference lists at our website and will no longer require expansion of many scientific, model, institutional, and experiment/program acronyms

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David A. R. Kristovich

Stanley A. Changnon, a highly prolific researcher in applied climatology, died on 1 May 2012. Stan had an exceptionally wide range of research interests; he published hundreds of journal articles in the areas of climate change, physical and societal impacts of climate, and weather and climate extremes (his obituary can be seen online at http://www.isws.illinois.edu/hilites/press/120508stan.asp). While much will be written in other forums about Stan’s many accomplishments, the editorial staff at the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology (JAMC) recognizes his outstanding contributions to this journal.

Stan’s professional career occurred at the Illinois State

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Kenneth F. Heideman

Meeting the needs of our authors and readership is the main mission of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Publications Department. In line with this goal, this editorial discusses and updates three topics of interest: open access to our online journals, a style change to our correspondence section, and color charges.

First, there have been increasing calls for open access to publicly funded articles printed in scientific journals. Publishers have wrestled with balancing the widest dissemination of their material with maintaining a revenue stream that is sufficient to cover the costs of publishing scientific content. For years, AMS made all journal

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