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David M. Schultz

Monthly Weather Review needs over a thousand peer reviews each year to maintain the high quality of articles that our readership have come to expect. We value our volunteer reviewers and recognize their investment that keeps our journal operating. As a result of their experience, professionalism, and generosity, the majority of these thousand reviews are thoughtful, thorough, and constructive. I hear about the negativity in peer review in journals from other disciplines, and I am thankful that we rarely see such serious issues in Monthly Weather Review.

We desire to maintain this character and quality of our reviews

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David M. Schultz and Peter Lynch

While Monthly Weather Review is celebrating its 150th year, another milestone in meteorology this year is the 100th anniversary of the publication of Lewis Fry Richardson’s Weather Prediction by Numerical Process. As we describe in this month’s editorial, Richardson’s meticulous attempt at hand-calculating the weather failed spectacularly but showed future workers the way forward. Their efforts helped to make Monthly Weather Review one of the leading journals for numerical modeling of the atmosphere.

The basic ideas of numerical forecasting and climate modeling were developed about a century ago, long before the first electronic computer

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David M. Schultz

As part of the 150th volume of Monthly Weather Review, we are telling stories from its 150-yr history in a series of editorials. This month’s editorial describes how Monthly Weather Review helped to found the Journal of Climate, which is now one of the leading journals in its field and is celebrating its 35th year.

Climate modeling had its birth in the 1960s within the pages of Monthly Weather Review with the seminal work by Joseph Smagorinsky and Nobel Prize–winner Syukuro Manabe (e.g., Smagorinsky 1963; Smagorinsky et al. 1965

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David M. Schultz

On 18–19 February 1979, a rapidly deepening cyclone moved up the East Coast of North America, eventually dumping up to 60 cm of snow in eastern Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware. The National Weather Service was caught unawares, with the operational forecast models at the time missing the cyclogenesis event entirely, and therefore, the public forecast omitting reference to the possibility of heavy snow. Because the storm happened on the Presidents’ Day holiday in the United States, the storm became known as the Presidents’ Day snowstorm.

Eighteen months later, in September 1980, Lance Bosart of the State University of New York

Open access
David M. Schultz, Altuğ Aksoy, Jeffrey Anderson, Tommaso Benacchio, Kristen L. Corbosiero, Matthew D. Eastin, Clark Evans, Jidong Gao, Almut Gassman, Joshua P. Hacker, Daniel Hodyss, Matthew R. Kumjian, Ron McTaggart-Cowan, Glen Romine, Paul Roundy, Angela Rowe, Elizabeth Satterfield, Russ S. Schumacher, Stan Trier, Christopher Weiss, Henry P. Huntington, and Gary M. Lackmann

Science requires evidence. Making data available lets other scientists confirm results, uncover errors, or find new insights. Moreover, gathering data can be expensive and time consuming. Because the same data can be used for a range of purposes, making data available can be an efficient use of limited research resources. Doing so can improve traceability and accountability when it comes to research findings.

These reasons and more lie behind recent efforts to promote data availability in research publications. The American Meteorological Society (AMS) recently updated its data policy guidelines (https://www.ametsoc.org/index.cfm/ams/publications/ethical-guidelines-and-ams-policies/data-policy-and-guidelines/) to require, among other things, that articles in

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David M. Schultz, Timothy M. DelSole, Robert M. Rauber, and Walter A. Robinson

All American Meteorological Society (AMS) journals now accept review articles. During its May 2017 meeting, the AMS Publications Commission approved a motion that all AMS journals encourage the publication of Reviews. Reviews are articles, focused on a specific topic, that synthesize previous research accomplishments, summarize the state of the science, and suggest avenues for future research. Reviews can be valuable additions to the AMS suite of publications, being often-read articles on a specialized topic that are readable for a more general audience than research articles. This Editorial describes the purpose, content, and the process of Reviews.

The purpose of a

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Robert M. Rauber

Expedited Contributions (ECs) have been a feature of American Meteorological Society (AMS) journals for six years. The twin goals of ECs when they were established were to reduce the time from submission to publication of research papers and to encourage authors to develop short, concise contributions to the journals. When ECs were created, the time to initial decision was nearly 80 days, and the production time (the time between acceptance and appearance online in final form) was approximately 160 days.

Since then, the time to initial decision has been reduced to 60 days, and also the production time has decreased

Open access
Robert M. Rauber

Beginning with the January 2017 issues of AMS journals, the embargo period for journal content will be reduced from two years to one year. Executive Director Keith Seitter’s column in the December 2016 issue of BAMS provides the rationale for this change and is summarized below.

The mandate from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in 2013 laid out the goal for federal funding agencies to develop a plan to support increased public access to the results of federally funded research. For the atmospheric, oceanic, and hydrologic science research that is published in our journals, this

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Greg M. McFarquhar and Robert M. Rauber

The purpose of this editorial is to introduce the new approach the American Meteorological Society (AMS) has taken with Meteorological Monographs and to distinguish them from the special collections of journal articles. Moreover, whereas Meteorological Monographs were previously published like traditional hardbound books, henceforth they will be entirely open access and online, in addition to being available in print.

Goals of Meteorological Monographs

The AMS Meteorological Monographs series will consist of collections of review papers on topics in which rapid developments are currently being made, as well as collections of papers summarizing state-of-the-art knowledge (e.g., from recent special topical meetings).

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David M. Schultz, Robert M. Rauber, and Kenneth F. Heideman

One of the foundations of science is that published work be an original contribution by the named author or authors. As global science grows, more authors are encouraged to publish, more papers are being published, and the pressure to publish increases. Authors submitting manuscripts to the journals of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) must confirm to AMS that the work has not been published in other journals. As a requirement to enter peer review, authors also should have read and accepted the conditions of “Author Disclosure and Obligations” at www.ametsoc.org/PUBSAuthorObligations. Items 5–7 discuss plagiarism, self-plagiarism, and fragmentation and

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