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Peter Black
,
Lee Harrison
,
Mark Beaubien
,
Robert Bluth
,
Roy Woods
,
Andrew Penny
,
Robert W. Smith
, and
James D. Doyle

Abstract

The High-Definition Sounding System (HDSS) is an automated system deploying the expendable digital dropsonde (XDD) designed to measure wind and pressure–temperature–humidity (PTH) profiles, and skin sea surface temperature (SST) within and around tropical cyclones (TCs) and other high-impact weather events needing high sampling density. Three experiments were conducted to validate the XDD.

On two successive days off the California coast, 10 XDDs and 14 Vaisala RD-94s were deployed from the navy’s Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft over offshore buoys. The Twin Otter made spiral descents from 4 km to 60 m at the same descent rate as the sondes. Differences between successive XDD and RD-94 profiles due to true meteorological variability were on the same order as the profile differences between the spirals, XDDs, and RD-94s. XDD SST measured via infrared microradiometer, referred to as infrared skin SST (SSTir), and surface wind measurements were within 0.5°C and 1.5 m s−1, respectively, of buoy and Twin Otter values.

A NASA DC-8 flight launched six XDDs from 12 km between ex-TC Cosme and the Baja California coast. Repeatability was shown with good agreement between features in successive profiles. XDD SSTir measurements from 18° to 28°C and surface winds agreed well with drifting buoy- and satellite-derived estimates.

Excellent agreement was found between PTH and wind profiles measured by XDDs deployed from a NASA WB-57 at 18-km altitude offshore from the Texas coast and NWS radiosonde profiles from Brownsville and Corpus Christi, Texas. Successful XDD profiles were obtained in the clear and within precipitation over an offshore squall line.

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William A. Komaromi
and
James D. Doyle

Abstract

Dropsonde data collected during the NASA Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) field campaign from 16 research missions spanning 6 tropical cyclones (TCs) are investigated, with an emphasis on TC outflow and the warm core. The Global Hawk (GH) AV-6 aircraft provided a unique opportunity to investigate the outflow characteristics due to a combination of 18+-h flight durations and the ability to release dropsondes from high altitudes above 100 hPa. Intensifying TCs are found to be associated with stronger upper-level divergence and radial outflow relative to nonintensifying TCs in the sample, regardless of current intensity. A layer of 2–4 m s−1 inflow 20–50 hPa deep is also observed 50–100 hPa above the maximum outflow layer, which appears to be associated with lower-stratospheric descent above the eye. The potential temperature of the outflow is found to be more strongly correlated with the equivalent potential temperature of the boundary layer inflow than to the present storm intensity, consistent with the outflow temperature having a stronger relationship with potential intensity than actual intensity. Finally, the outflow originates from a region of low inertial stability that extends above the cyclone from 300 to 150 hPa and from 50- to 200-km radius.

The unique nature of this dataset allows the height and structure of the warm core also to be investigated. The magnitude of the warm core was found to be positively correlated with TC intensity, while the height of the warm core was weakly positively correlated with intensity. Finally, neither the height nor magnitude of the warm core exhibits any meaningful relationship with intensity change.

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Robert L. Creasey
and
Russell L. Elsberry

Abstract

A method is developed to calculate the zero-wind center (ZWC) position from a sequence of Yankee High Density Sounding System (HDSS) dropwindsondes deployed during a high-altitude overpass of a tropical cyclone. The approach is similar to the Willoughby and Chelmow technique in that it utilizes the intersections of bearings normal to the wind directions across the center to locate the ZWC position. Average wind directions over 1-km layers are calculated from the accurate global positioning system (GPS) latitude–longitude positions as the HDSS sonde falls from the 60 000-ft flight level of the NASA WB-57 to the ocean surface. An iterative procedure is used to also account for the storm translation, which is necessary to put these high-frequency HDSS observations into a storm-relative coordinate system. The Tropical Cyclone Intensity (TCI-15) mission into Hurricane Joaquin on 4 October 2015 is examined here. The ZWC positions from two center overpasses indicate the vortex tilts from 1- to 10-km elevation and rotates cyclonically with height.

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