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Inez Z. Ponce de Leon

Abstract

Supertyphoon Haiyan hit the Philippines in 2013, causing massive damage and loss of lives. The media blamed the government for faulty warnings, including using the term “storm surge,” which people reportedly did not understand. As a result, the national agency tasked with disaster risk management recommended translating the term for better response in future storms. Such an approach shortchanges the complexity of risk construction and dismisses the possibility that different communities also have different understandings of risk. In this study, the researcher examined the special case of Coron, Palawan: a major tourist destination that is rarely hit by storms but that became the site of Haiyan’s last landfall. Guided by encoding–decoding theory, the researcher interviewed local government officials and carried out focus group discussions with representatives of two communities (whose names have been hidden under pseudonyms for this study): Central, close to the municipal center, and Island, a coastal village far away from potential aid and rescue. The researcher found a portrait of contrasts that split Coron: a mayor who surrendered all control and a risk management officer who planned for long-term hazard response—Island waiting for government instructions despite knowing about storm behavior and Central taking the initiative to create long-term solutions. Island also knew what storm surges were and did not need translation of the term. These findings show that risk constructions can differ even at the municipal level, which should prompt further research into the role of local knowledge in understanding risk and hazard warnings.

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Kelley M. Murphy, Eric C. Bruning, Christopher J. Schultz, and Jennifer K. Vanos

Abstract

A lightning risk assessment for application to human safety was created and applied in 10 west Texas locations from 2 May 2016 to 30 September 2016. The method combined spatial lightning mapping data, probabilistic risk calculation adapted from the International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62305-2, and weighted average interpolation to produce risk magnitudes that were compared with tolerability thresholds to issue lightning warnings. These warnings were compared with warnings created for the same dataset using a more standard lightning safety approach that was based on National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) total lightning within 5 n mi (1 n mi = 1.852 km) of each location. Four variations of the calculation as well as different units of risk were tested to find the optimal configuration to calculate risk to an isolated human outdoors. The best-performing risk configuration using risk (10 min)−1 or larger produced the most comparable results to the standard method, such as number of failures, average warning duration, and total time under warnings. This risk configuration produced fewer failures than the standard method but longer total time under warnings and higher false alarm ratios. Median lead times associated with the risk configuration were longer than the standard method for all units considered, whereas median down times were shorter for risk (10 min)−1 and risk (15 min)−1. Overall, the risk method provides a baseline framework to quantify the changing lightning hazard on the storm scale and could be a useful tool to aid in lightning decision support scenarios.

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Yajie Li, Amanda Lee Hughes, and Peter D. Howe

Abstract

Message diffusion and message persuasion are two important aspects of success for official risk messages about hazards. Message diffusion enables more people to receive lifesaving messages, and message persuasion motivates them to take protective actions. This study helps to identify win–win message strategies by investigating how an underexamined factor, message content that is theoretically important to message persuasion, influences message diffusion for official risk messages about heat hazards on Twitter. Using multilevel negative binomial regression models, the respective and cumulative effects of four persuasive message factors—hazard intensity, health risk susceptibility, health impact, and response instruction—on retweet counts were analyzed using a dataset of heat-related tweets issued by U.S. National Weather Service accounts. Two subsets of heat-related tweets were also analyzed: 1) heat warning tweets about current or anticipated extreme heat events and 2) tweets about nonextreme heat events. This study found that heat-related tweets that mentioned more types of persuasive message factors were retweeted more frequently, and so were two subtypes of heat-related tweets. Mentions of hazard intensity also consistently predicted increased retweet counts. Mentions of health impacts positively influenced message diffusion for heat-related tweets and tweets about nonextreme heat events. Mentions of health risk susceptibility and response instructions positively predicted retweet counts for tweets about nonextreme heat events and tweets about official extreme heat warnings, respectively. In the context of natural hazards, this research informs practitioners with evidence-based message strategies to increase message diffusion on social media. Such strategies also have the potential to improve message persuasion.

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Julia Linder and Victoria Campbell-Arvai

Abstract

In the midwestern United States, intensifying impacts from climate change necessitate adaptation by the agricultural sector. Tree fruit agriculture is uniquely vulnerable to climate change due to the long-lived nature of perennial systems, yet very few studies have addressed how fruit growers perceive climate change and are responding to climate risks. For this study, 16 semistructured interviews were conducted with Michigan tree fruit growers to understand how their climate change beliefs, beliefs about adaptive actions, and climate-related risk perceptions influence adaptation behaviors. While there was a great deal of uncertainty about the anthropogenic nature of climate change, growers generally agreed that unprecedented changes in climate and weather patterns were occurring. Because of a perception of little control over future climate impacts, most growers reactively adapted to climate risks that negatively impacted their orchards by implementing measures such as frost protection, irrigation, pesticides, and crop insurance. This study highlighted that while proactive adaptations such as crop diversification, planting new varieties, and improving soil health will be necessary to increase farm resilience in the future, growers were unable to justify making these changes due to their uncertainty about future climate changes. The findings from this study highlight the need for future outreach efforts by university extension agents, private agricultural advisors, and federal and state agency advisors to provide educational information on the long-term impacts of climate change in order to help growers increase the resilience of their farm in the face of future climate impacts.

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Abdulrahman Khamaj, Amin G. Alhashim, Vincent T. Ybarra, and Azham Hussain

Abstract

Communicating weather forecasts from the public perspective is essential for meeting people’s needs and enhancing their overall experiences. Because of the lack of cited work on the public’s behavior and perception of weather data and delivery sources in Middle Eastern countries such as Saudi Arabia (KSA), this study employs a cross-sectional questionnaire to fill the gap and apply the protective action decision model to non-Western individuals. The questionnaire examined respondents’ opinions about 1) the importance of weather forecast accessibility, 2) crucial weather features, and 3) available features on existing smartphone weather applications (apps) in KSA. The results showed that nearly all participants reported that their decisions of daily lives and activities were highly dependent on weather forecasts. Most participants thought weather forecast features are necessary. Although the most commonly used source for weather forecasts in KSA was smartphone apps, many participants responded that these apps were lacking specific weather functionalities (e.g., giving weather alerts to their exact location). Regression analyses found that KSA individuals who do not believe that weather forecasts are important are predicted by 1) not wanting any new features added to weather applications and 2) thinking that weather forecasts do not impact lives or property. This study’s findings can guide governmental and private weather agencies in KSA and other Middle Eastern or developing countries to better understand how to meet and communicate people’s weather needs.

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Ryan J. Longman, Oliver Elison Timm, Thomas W. Giambelluca, and Lauren Kaiser

Abstract

Undisturbed trade-wind conditions compose the most prevalent synoptic weather pattern in Hawai‘i and produce a distinct pattern of orographic rainfall. Significant total rainfall contributions and extreme events are linked to four types of atmospheric disturbances: cold fronts, kona lows, upper-tropospheric disturbances, and tropical cyclones. In this study, a 20-yr (1990–2010) categorical disturbance time series is compiled and analyzed in relation to daily rainfall over the same period. The primary objective of this research is to determine how disturbances contribute to total wet-season rainfall on the Island of O‘ahu, Hawai‘i. On average, 41% of wet-seasonal rainfall occurs on disturbance days. A total of 17% of seasonal rainfall can be directly attributed to disturbances (after a background signal is removed) and as much as 48% in a single season. The intensity of disturbance rainfall (mm day−1) is a stronger predictor (r 2 = 0.49; p < 0.001) of the total seasonal rainfall than the frequency of occurrence (r 2 = 0.11; p = 0.153). Cold fronts are the most common disturbance type; however, the rainfall associated with fronts that cross the island is significantly higher than rainfall produced from noncrossing fronts. In fact, noncrossing fronts produce significantly less rainfall than under mean nondisturbance conditions 76% of the time. While the combined influence of atmospheric disturbances can account for almost one-half of the rainfall received during the wet season, the primary factor in determining a relatively wet or dry season/year on Oʻahu is the frequency and rainfall intensity of kona low events.

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Tuomas Naakka, Tiina Nygård, and Timo Vihma

Abstract

Atmospheric moisture is a key component in the water cycle and radiative transfer. In this study, a comprehensive picture of air moisture climatology and related physical processes is presented for the first time for the circumpolar area south of 50°S. The results are based on the most modern global reanalysis, ERA5, which manages reasonably well to close the Antarctic water budget. We show that over the ocean transient cyclones have the dominant role in determining moisture conditions, whereas over the continent the moisture conditions are largely affected by the mean circulation. Over the open sea, moisture transport from lower latitudes is an equally important source of moisture compared to the local evaporation, but practically all precipitating moisture over the plateau is provided by the horizontal transport. Over the ocean and continental slopes, southward moisture transport brings warm and moist air masses from lower latitudes, notably increasing atmospheric water vapor and cloud water, and simultaneously decreasing local evaporation over the open sea. On the Antarctic plateau, radiative cooling leads to high relative humidity and causes condensation of moisture especially near the surface, causing a nearly permanent specific humidity inversion layer. As a consequence, dry air masses with extremely low specific humidity are formed. These dry air masses are transported downward from the plateau by katabatic winds, experiencing adiabatic warming. This leads to a decrease in relative humidity and to a downward-directed sensible heat flux, which enable efficient surface evaporation on the coastal slopes and farther over coastal polynyas and leads.

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Ming Zhang, Yonggang Liu, Jian Zhang, and Qin Wen

Abstract

North Africa was green during the mid-Holocene [about 6000 years ago (6 ka)] and emitted much less dust to the atmosphere than in the present day. Here we use a fully coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation model, CESM1.2.2, to test the impact of dust reduction and greening of the Sahara on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) during this period. Results show that dust removal leads to a decrease of AMOC by 6.2% while greening of the Sahara with 100% shrub (100% grass) cover causes an enhancement of the AMOC by 6.1% (4.8%). The AMOC is increased by 5.3% (2.3%) when both the dust reduction and green Sahara with 100% shrub (100% grass) are considered. The AMOC changes are primarily due to the precipitation change over the west subtropical North Atlantic, from where the salinity anomaly is advected to the deep-water formation region. Global-mean surface temperature increases by 0.09° and 0.40°C (0.25°C) when global dust is removed and when North Africa and the Arabian region are covered by shrub (grass), respectively, showing a dominating effect of vegetation over dust. The comparison between modeled and reconstructed sea surface temperature is improved when the effect of vegetation is considered. The results may have implications for climate impact of future wetting over North Africa, either through global warming or through building of solar farms and wind farms.

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Samar Minallah and Allison L. Steiner

Abstract

This study evaluates the historical climatology and future changes of the atmospheric water cycle for the Laurentian Great Lakes region using 15 models from phase 6 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6). While the models have unique seasonal characteristics in the historical (1981–2010) simulations, common patterns emerge in the midcentury SSP2–4.5 scenario (2041–70), including a prevalent shift in the precipitation seasonal cycle with summer drying and wetter winter and spring months, and a ubiquitous increase in the magnitudes of convective precipitation, evapotranspiration, and moisture inflow into the region. The seasonal cycle of moisture flux convergence is amplified (i.e., the magnitude of winter convergence and summer divergence increases), which is the primary driver of future total precipitation changes. The precipitation recycling ratio is also projected to decline in summer and increase in winter by midcentury, signifying a larger contribution of the regional moisture (via evapotranspiration) to total precipitation in the colder months. Most models (10/15) either do not represent the Great Lakes or have major inconsistencies in how the lakes are simulated both in terms of spatial representation and treatment of lake processes. In models with some lake presence, the contribution of lake grid cells to the regional evapotranspiration magnitude can be more than 50% in winter. In the future, winter months have a larger increase in evaporation over water surfaces than the surrounding land, which corroborates past findings of sensitivity of deep lakes to climate warming and highlights the importance of lake representation in these models for reliable regional hydroclimatic assessments.

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Ziyi Cai, Qinglong You, Fangying Wu, Hans W. Chen, Deliang Chen, and Judah Cohen

Abstract

The Arctic has experienced a warming rate higher than the global mean in the past decades, but previous studies show that there are large uncertainties associated with future Arctic temperature projections. In this study, near-surface mean temperatures in the Arctic are analyzed from 22 models participating in phase 6 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP6). Compared with the ERA5 reanalysis, most CMIP6 models underestimate the observed mean temperature in the Arctic during 1979–2014. The largest cold biases are found over the Greenland Sea the Barents Sea, and the Kara Sea. Under the SSP1-2.6, SSP2-4.5, and SSP5-8.5 scenarios, the multimodel ensemble mean of 22 CMIP6 models exhibits significant Arctic warming in the future and the warming rate is more than twice that of the global/Northern Hemisphere mean. Model spread is the largest contributor to the overall uncertainty in projections, which accounts for 55.4% of the total uncertainty at the start of projections in 2015 and remains at 32.9% at the end of projections in 2095. Internal variability uncertainty accounts for 39.3% of the total uncertainty at the start of projections but decreases to 6.5% at the end of the twenty-first century, while scenario uncertainty rapidly increases from 5.3% to 60.7% over the period from 2015 to 2095. It is found that the largest model uncertainties are consistent cold bias in the oceanic regions in the models, which is connected with excessive sea ice area caused by the weak Atlantic poleward heat transport. These results suggest that large intermodel spread and uncertainties exist in the CMIP6 models’ simulation and projection of the Arctic near-surface temperature and that there are different responses over the ocean and land in the Arctic to greenhouse gas forcing. Future research needs to pay more attention to the different characteristics and mechanisms of Arctic Ocean and land warming to reduce the spread.

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