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Donghyuck Yoon, Dong-Hyun Cha, Myong-In Lee, Ki-Hong Min, Sang-Yoon Jun, and Yonghan Choi

Abstract

South Korea’s heat wave events over 39 years (1980–2018) were defined by spatiotemporal criteria, and their quantitative characteristics were analyzed. The duration and intensity of these events ranked highest in 2016 and 2018. An examination of synoptic conditions of heat wave events in 2016 and 2018 based on a reanalysis dataset revealed a positive anomaly of 500-hPa geopotential height, which could have induced warm conditions over the Korean Peninsula in both years. However, a difference prevailed in that there was a blocking high over the Kamchatka Peninsula and a continental thermal high over northern China in 2016, while the expansion of the western North Pacific subtropical high was mainly associated with 2018 heat wave events. Numerical experiments using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model were conducted to 1) evaluate how distinct meteorological characteristics of heat wave events in 2016 and 2018 were reproduced by the model, and 2) investigate how they affect extreme temperature events. Typical synoptic features of the 2016 heat wave events (i.e., Kamchatka blocking and continental thermal high) were not captured well by the WRF Model, while those of 2018 were reasonably reproduced. On the contrary, the heat wave event during late August 2016 related to the Kamchatka blocking high was realistically simulated when the blocking was artificially sustained by applying spectral nudging. In conclusion, the existence of a blocking high over the Kamchatka region (i.e., northern Pacific region) is an important feature to accurately predict long-lasting heat waves in East Asia.

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Ke Xu, Riyu Lu, Ying Na, Baek-Jo Kim, Jiangyu Mao, Jae-Young Byon, and Bo Pang

Abstract

This study indicates a significant variation of humidity on extreme heat (EH) days over South Korea and southern–central Japan during the period 1979–2018. EH is therefore classified into three categories: type-A wet EH, type-B wet EH, and dry EH. Their statistical characteristics and formation mechanisms are investigated and compared. Our results suggest that the type-A wet EH is the most destructive, with the highest intensity, longest duration, and broadest spatial scale covering most of midlatitude East Asia. By contrast, type-B wet EH and dry EH are weaker, shorter, and mostly confined to northeast Asia. Despite these differences in characteristics, both types of wet EH are caused by the poleward advance of tropical warm and humid air masses as a result of the northward displacement of the Asian westerly jet. By contrast, dry EH is primarily induced by an increase in adiabatic heating and solar radiation resulting from anomalous subsidence. The three types of EH are associated with distinct large-scale teleconnections over Eurasia. A stable and persistent tripole wave pattern is responsible for type-A wet EH. The activity of atmospheric blocking over northern Europe, where the pattern originates, plays a crucial role in maintaining this pattern. By contrast, type-B wet EH and dry EH are related to a quadrupole pattern and a Silk Road pattern–like teleconnection, respectively, both lasting for a shorter time. These results highlight the diversity of EH, which suggests that multiple local and large-scale circulations should be considered to improve the forecast skills for EH.

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Thomas W. N. Haine

Abstract

The global ocean overturning circulation carries warm, salty water to high latitudes, both in the Arctic and Antarctic. Interaction with the atmosphere transforms this inflow into three distinct products: sea ice, surface Polar Water, and deep Overflow Water. The Polar Water and Overflow Water form estuarine and thermal overturning cells, stratified by salinity and temperature, respectively. A conceptual model specifies the characteristics of these water masses and cells given the inflow and air–sea–land fluxes of heat and freshwater. The model includes budgets of mass, salt, and heat, and parameterizations of Polar Water and Overflow Water formation, which include exchange with continental shelves. Model solutions are mainly controlled by a linear combination of air–sea–ice heat and freshwater fluxes and inflow heat flux that approximates the meteoric freshwater flux plus the sea ice export flux. The model shows that for the Arctic, the thermal overturning is likely robust, but the estuarine cell appears vulnerable to collapse via a so-called heat crisis that violates the budget equations. The system is pushed toward this crisis by increasing Atlantic Water inflow heat flux, increasing meteoric freshwater flux, and/or decreasing heat loss to the atmosphere. The Antarctic appears close to a so-called Overflow Water emergency with weak constraints on the strengths of the estuarine and thermal cells, uncertain sensitivity to parameters, and possibility of collapse of the thermal cell.

Open access
Oleg A. Saenko, Jonathan M. Gregory, Stephen M. Griffies, Matthew P. Couldrey, and Fabio Boeira Dias

Abstract

Using an ensemble of atmosphere–ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) in an idealized climate change experiment, this study quantifies the contributions to ocean heat uptake (OHU) from ocean physical parameterizations and resolved dynamical processes operating at different scales. Analysis of heat budget diagnostics reveals a leading-order global heat balance in the subsurface upper ocean in a steady state between the large-scale circulation warming it and mesoscale processes cooling it, and shows that there are positive contributions from processes on all scales to the subsurface OHU during climate change. There is better agreement among the AOGCMs in the net OHU than in the individual scales/processes contributing to it. In the upper ocean and at high latitudes, OHU is dominated by small-scale diapycnal processes. Below 400 m, OHU is dominated by the superresidual transport, representing large-scale ocean dynamics combined with all parameterized mesoscale and submesoscale eddy effects. Weakening of the AMOC leads to less heat convergence in the subpolar North Atlantic and less heat divergence at lower latitudes, with a small overall effect on the net Atlantic heat content. At low latitudes, the dominance of advective heat redistribution is contrary to the diffusive OHU mechanism assumed by the commonly used upwelling-diffusion model. Using a density water-mass framework, it is found that most of the OHU occurs along isopycnal directions. This feature of OHU is used to accurately reconstruct the global vertical ocean warming profile from the surface heat flux anomalies, supporting advective (rather than diffusive) models of OHU and sea level rise.

Open access
Yalei You, S. Joseph Munchak, Christa Peters-Lidard, and Sarah Ringerud

Abstract

Rainfall retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers often exploit the brightness temperature depression due to ice scattering at high-frequency channels (≥85 GHz) over land. This study presents an alternate method to estimate the daily rainfall amount using the emissivity temporal variation (i.e., Δe) under rain-free conditions at low-frequency channels (19, 24, and 37 GHz). Emissivity is derived from 10 passive microwave radiometers, including the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI), the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), three Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounders (SSMIS), the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS), and four Advanced Microwave Sounding Units-A (AMSU-A). Four different satellite combination schemes are used to derive the Δe for daily rainfall estimates. They are all 10 satellites, 5 imagers, 6 satellites with very different equator crossing times, and GMI only. Results show that Δe from all 10 satellites has the best performance with a correlation of 0.60 and RMSE of 6.52 mm, compared with the Integrated Multisatellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) Final run product. The 6-satellites scheme has comparable performance with the all-10-satellites scheme. The 5-imagers scheme performs noticeably worse with a correlation of 0.49 and RMSE of 7.28 mm, while the GMI-only scheme performs the worst with a correlation of 0.25 and RMSE of 11.36 mm. The inferior performance from the 5-imagers and GMI-only schemes can be explained by the much longer revisit time, which cannot accurately capture the emissivity temporal variation.

Open access
Matthew Henry, Timothy M. Merlis, Nicholas J. Lutsko, and Brian E. J. Rose

Abstract

The precise mechanisms driving Arctic amplification are still under debate. Previous attribution methods compute the vertically uniform temperature change required to balance the top-of-atmosphere energy imbalance caused by each forcing and feedback, with any departures from vertically uniform warming collected into the lapse-rate feedback. We propose an alternative attribution method using a single-column model that accounts for the forcing dependence of high-latitude lapse-rate changes. We examine this method in an idealized general circulation model (GCM), finding that, even though the column-integrated carbon dioxide (CO2) forcing and water vapor feedback are stronger in the tropics, they contribute to polar-amplified surface warming as they produce bottom-heavy warming in high latitudes. A separation of atmospheric temperature changes into local and remote contributors shows that, in the absence of polar surface forcing (e.g., sea ice retreat), changes in energy transport are primarily responsible for the polar-amplified pattern of warming. The addition of surface forcing substantially increases polar surface warming and reduces the contribution of atmospheric dry static energy transport to the warming. This physically based attribution method can be applied to comprehensive GCMs to provide a clearer view of the mechanisms behind Arctic amplification.

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Svenja Ryan, Caroline C. Ummenhofer, Glen Gawarkiewicz, Patrick Wagner, Markus Scheinert, Arne Biastoch, and Claus W. Böning

Abstract

Marine heatwaves along the coast of Western Australia, referred to as Ningaloo Niño, have had dramatic impacts on the ecosystem in the recent decade. A number of local and remote forcing mechanisms have been put forward; however, little is known about the depth structure of such temperature extremes. Utilizing an eddy-active global ocean general circulation model, Ningaloo Niño and the corresponding cold Ningaloo Niña events are investigated between 1958 and 2016, with a focus on their depth structure. The relative roles of buoyancy and wind forcing are inferred from sensitivity experiments. Composites reveal a strong symmetry between cold and warm events in their vertical structure and associated large-scale spatial patterns. Temperature anomalies are largest at the surface, where buoyancy forcing is dominant, and extend down to 300-m depth (or deeper), with wind forcing being the main driver. Large-scale subsurface anomalies arise from a vertical modulation of the thermocline, extending from the western Pacific into the tropical eastern Indian Ocean. The strongest Ningaloo Niños in 2000 and 2011 are unprecedented compound events, where long-lasting high temperatures are accompanied by extreme freshening, which emerges in association with La Niñas, that is more common and persistent during the negative phase of the interdecadal Pacific oscillation. It is shown that Ningaloo Niños during La Niña phases have a distinctively deeper reach and are associated with a strengthening of the Leeuwin Current, while events during El Niño are limited to the surface layer temperatures, likely driven by local atmosphere–ocean feedbacks, without a clear imprint on salinity and velocity.

Open access
Xiaozhou Ruan and Raffaele Ferrari

Abstract

Turbulent mixing across density surfaces transforms abyssal ocean waters into lighter waters and is vital to close the deepest branches of the global overturning circulation. Over the last 20 years, mixing rates inferred from in situ microstructure profilers and tracer release experiments (TREs) have provided valuable insights in the connection between small-scale mixing and large-scale ocean circulation. Problematically, estimates based on TREs consistently exceed those from collocated in situ microstructure measurements. These differences have been attributed to a low bias in the microstructure estimates that can miss strong, but rare, mixing events. Here we demonstrate that TRE estimates can suffer from a high bias, because of the approximations generally made to interpret the data. We first derive formulas to estimate mixing from the temporal growth of the second moment of a tracer patch by extending Taylor’s celebrated formula to account for both density stratification and variations in mixing rates. The formulas are validated with tracers released in numerical simulations of turbulent flows and then used to discuss biases in the interpretation of TREs based estimates and how to possibly overcome them.

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Daisuke Takasuka and Masaki Satoh

Abstract

As one of the aspects of the diversity of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), the modulation of initiation regions of the boreal-winter MJO is studied in terms of the relationship between intraseasonal and interannual variabilities. MJOs are categorized as those initiating in the Indian Ocean (IO), Maritime Continent (MC), and western Pacific (WP), referred to herein as IO-MJOs, MC-MJOs, and WP-MJOs, respectively. The composite analyses for each MJO category using observational data reveal that the diversity of MJO initiation regions directly results from the modulation of areas where horizontal advective premoistening efficiently occurs via intraseasonal/synoptic-scale winds. This is supported by the difference in the zonal location of equatorial intraseasonal circulations established before MJO initiation, which is related to a spatial change in background convection and associated Walker circulations forced by interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability. Compared to IO-MJOs (favored in the climatological background on average), MC-MJOs tend to be realized under the eastern-Pacific El Niño–like condition, as a result of eastward-shifted intraseasonal convection and circulation patterns induced by background suppressed convection in the eastern MC. WP-MJOs are frequently initiated under the central-Pacific El Niño–like and positive IO dipole–like conditions, in which the WP is selectively moistened with the aid of background enhanced (suppressed) convection over the WP (the southeastern IO and the central-to-eastern Pacific). This major tendency derived from sample-limited observations is verified by a set of 15-yr numerical experiments with a global nonhydrostatic MJO-permitting model under a perpetual boreal-winter condition where observation-based SSTs are prescribed.

Open access
Shuoyi Ding, Bingyi Wu, and Wen Chen

Abstract

The present study investigated dominant characteristics of autumn Arctic sea ice concentration (SIC) interannual variations and impacts of September–October (SO) mean SIC anomalies in the East Siberian–Chukchi–Beaufort (EsCB) Seas on winter Eurasian climate variability. Results showed that the decreased SO EsCB sea ice is favorable for tropospheric warming and positive geopotential height anomaly over the Arctic region one month later through transporting much more heat flux to the atmosphere from the open water. When entering the early winter (November–January), enhanced upward propagation of quasi-stationary planetary waves in the mid-high latitudes generates anomalous Eliassen–Palm flux convergence in the upper troposphere, which decelerates the westerly winds and maintains the positive geopotential height anomaly in the Arctic region. This anticyclonic anomaly extends southward into central-western Eurasia and leads to evident surface cooling there. Two months later, it further develops downstream accompanied by a deepened trough, making northeastern China experience a colder late winter (January–March). Meanwhile, an anticyclonic anomaly over the eastern North Pacific excites a horizontal eastward wave train and contributes to a positive (negative) geopotential height anomaly around Greenland (Europe), favoring a negative surface temperature anomaly over western Europe. In addition, the stratospheric polar vortex is also significantly weakened in the wintertime, which is attributed to a decreased meridional temperature gradient, and decelerated westerly winds provide a favorable condition for more quasi-stationary planetary waves propagating into the stratosphere. Some major features of atmospheric responses to EsCB sea ice loss are well reproduced in the CAM4 sensitivity experiments.

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