We have identified several errors in the calculations that were performed to create Fig. 3 of Del Genio et al. (2012). These errors affect the composite evolution of precipitation and column water vapor versus lag relative to the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) peak presented in that figure. The precipitation and column water vapor data for the April and November 2009 MJO events were composited incorrectly because the date of the MJO peak at a given longitude was assigned to the incorrect longitude band. In addition, the precipitation data for all MJO events were first accumulated daily and the daily accumulations averaged at each lag to create the composite, rather than the averaging of instantaneous values that was used for other composite figures in the paper. One poorly sampled day in the west Pacific therefore biases the composite precipitation in that region at several lags after the MJO peak. Finally, a 4-day running mean was mistakenly applied to the precipitation and column water vapor data rather than the intended 5-day running mean.

The results of the corrections are that an anomalous west Pacific precipitation maximum 5–10 days after the MJO peak is removed and the maximum in west Pacific precipitation one pentad before the MJO peak is now more evident; there is now a clear maximum in precipitation for the entire warm pool one pentad before the MJO peak; west Pacific column water vapor now varies more strongly as a function of lag relative to the peak; and precipitation, and to a lesser extent column water vapor, in general vary more smoothly with time. The corrections do not affect any other parts of the paper nor do they change the scientific conclusions we reached.

The 4-day running mean error also affects Figs. 1 and 2 therein, with almost imperceptible impacts that do not affect any results or necessitate major changes to the text.

The corrected figures (Figs. 13) are shown. The sentence beginning at the bottom of p. 3759 should be revised to read:

“The moisture budget and the precipitation both appear to equilibrate about a week before the MJO peak.”

Fig. 1.

MJO composite vertical profile of cloud frequency of occurrence vs lag relative to the peak for all 10 events in the domain in GEOPROF-lidar data. (top) Absolute occurrence frequencies and (bottom) anomaly relative to the longitudinal mean at each altitude.

Fig. 1.

MJO composite vertical profile of cloud frequency of occurrence vs lag relative to the peak for all 10 events in the domain in GEOPROF-lidar data. (top) Absolute occurrence frequencies and (bottom) anomaly relative to the longitudinal mean at each altitude.

Fig. 2.

As in Fig. 1 (bottom), but for the (top) IO, (middle) MC, and (bottom) WP.

Fig. 2.

As in Fig. 1 (bottom), but for the (top) IO, (middle) MC, and (bottom) WP.

Fig. 3.

MJO composites of AMSR-E (top) precipitation rate and (bottom) column water vapor vs lag for the entire domain and for the IO, MC, and WP subregions.

Fig. 3.

MJO composites of AMSR-E (top) precipitation rate and (bottom) column water vapor vs lag for the entire domain and for the IO, MC, and WP subregions.

REFERENCE

REFERENCE
Del Genio
,
A. D.
,
Y.
Chen
,
D.
Kim
, and
M.-S.
Yao
,
2012
:
The MJO transition from shallow to deep convection in CloudSat/CALIPSO data and GISS GCM simulations
.
J. Climate
,
25
,
3755
3770
, doi:.

Footnotes

*

Current affiliation: Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

+

Current affiliation: Trinnovim LLC, Institute for Space Studies, New York, New York.