Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 15 of 15 items for

  • Author or Editor: P. Zuidema x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Xubin Zeng
,
Lincoln Alves
,
Marie-Amélie Boucher
,
Annalisa Cherchi
,
Charlotte DeMott
,
A.P. Dimri
,
Andrew Gettelman
,
Edward Hanna
,
Takeshi Horinouchi
,
Jin Huang
,
Chris Lennard
,
L. Ruby Leung
,
Yali Luo
,
Meloth Thamban
,
Hindumathi Palanisamy
,
Sara C. Pryor
,
Marion Saint-Lu
,
Stefan P. Sobolowski
,
Detlef Stammer
,
Jakob Steiner
,
Bjorn Stevens
,
Stefan Uhlenbrook
,
Michael Wehner
, and
Paquita Zuidema

Abstract

The future state of the global water cycle and prediction of freshwater availability for humans around the world remain among the challenges of climate research and are relevant to several United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The Global Precipitation EXperiment (GPEX) takes on the challenge of improving the prediction of precipitation quantity, phase, timing and intensity, characteristics that are products of a complex integrated system. It will achieve this by leveraging existing World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) activities and community capabilities in satellite, surface-based, and airborne observations, modeling and experimental research, and by conducting new and focused activities. It was launched in October 2023 as a WCRP Lighthouse Activity. Here we present an overview of the GPEX Science Plan that articulates the primary science questions related to precipitation measurements, process understanding, model performance and improvements, and plans for capacity development. The central phase of GPEX is the WCRP Years of Precipitation for 2-3 years with coordinated global field campaigns focusing on different storm types (atmospheric rivers, mesoscale convective systems, monsoons, and tropical cyclones, among others) over different regions and seasons. Activities are planned over the three phases (before, during, and after the Years of Precipitation) spanning a decade. These include gridded data evaluation and development, advanced modeling, enhanced understanding of processes critical to precipitation, multi-scale prediction of precipitation events across scales, and capacity development. These activities will be further developed as part of the GPEX Implementation Plan.

Open access
Robert M. Rauber
,
Harry T. Ochs III
,
L. Di Girolamo
,
S. Göke
,
E. Snodgrass
,
Bjorn Stevens
,
Charles Knight
,
J. B. Jensen
,
D. H. Lenschow
,
R. A. Rilling
,
D. C. Rogers
,
J. L. Stith
,
B. A. Albrecht
,
P. Zuidema
,
A. M. Blyth
,
C. W. Fairall
,
W. A. Brewer
,
S. Tucker
,
S. G. Lasher-Trapp
,
O. L. Mayol-Bracero
,
G. Vali
,
B. Geerts
,
J. R. Anderson
,
B. A. Baker
,
R. P. Lawson
,
A. R. Bandy
,
D. C. Thornton
,
E. Burnet
,
J-L. Brenguier
,
L. Gomes
,
P. R. A. Brown
,
P. Chuang
,
W. R. Cotton
,
H. Gerber
,
B. G. Heikes
,
J. G. Hudson
,
P. Kollias
,
S. K. Krueger
,
L. Nuijens
,
D. W. O'Sullivan
,
A. P. Siebesma
, and
C. H. Twohy
Full access
Yolande L. Serra
,
Jennifer S. Haase
,
David K. Adams
,
Qiang Fu
,
Thomas P. Ackerman
,
M. Joan Alexander
,
Avelino Arellano
,
Larissa Back
,
Shu-Hua Chen
,
Kerry Emanuel
,
Zeljka Fuchs
,
Zhiming Kuang
,
Benjamin R Lintner
,
Brian Mapes
,
David Neelin
,
David Raymond
,
Adam H. Sobel
,
Paul W. Staten
,
Aneesh Subramanian
,
David W. J. Thompson
,
Gabriel Vecchi
,
Robert Wood
, and
Paquita Zuidema
Full access
Paquita Zuidema
,
Ping Chang
,
Brian Medeiros
,
Ben P. Kirtman
,
Roberto Mechoso
,
Edwin K. Schneider
,
Thomas Toniazzo
,
Ingo Richter
,
R. Justin Small
,
Katinka Bellomo
,
Peter Brandt
,
Simon de Szoeke
,
J. Thomas Farrar
,
Eunsil Jung
,
Seiji Kato
,
Mingkui Li
,
Christina Patricola
,
Zaiyu Wang
,
Robert Wood
, and
Zhao Xu

Abstract

Well-known problems trouble coupled general circulation models of the eastern Atlantic and Pacific Ocean basins. Model climates are significantly more symmetric about the equator than is observed. Model sea surface temperatures are biased warm south and southeast of the equator, and the atmosphere is too rainy within a band south of the equator. Near-coastal eastern equatorial SSTs are too warm, producing a zonal SST gradient in the Atlantic opposite in sign to that observed. The U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Program (CLIVAR) Eastern Tropical Ocean Synthesis Working Group (WG) has pursued an updated assessment of coupled model SST biases, focusing on the surface energy balance components, on regional error sources from clouds, deep convection, winds, and ocean eddies; on the sensitivity to model resolution; and on remote impacts. Motivated by the assessment, the WG makes the following recommendations: 1) encourage identification of the specific parameterizations contributing to the biases in individual models, as these can be model dependent; 2) restrict multimodel intercomparisons to specific processes; 3) encourage development of high-resolution coupled models with a concurrent emphasis on parameterization development of finer-scale ocean and atmosphere features, including low clouds; 4) encourage further availability of all surface flux components from buoys, for longer continuous time periods, in persistently cloudy regions; and 5) focus on the eastern basin coastal oceanic upwelling regions, where further opportunities for observational–modeling synergism exist.

Full access
Robert M. Rauber
,
Bjorn Stevens
,
Harry T. Ochs III
,
Charles Knight
,
B. A. Albrecht
,
A. M. Blyth
,
C. W. Fairall
,
J. B. Jensen
,
S. G. Lasher-Trapp
,
O. L. Mayol-Bracero
,
G. Vali
,
J. R. Anderson
,
B. A. Baker
,
A. R. Bandy
,
E. Burnet
,
J.-L. Brenguier
,
W. A. Brewer
,
P. R. A. Brown
,
R Chuang
,
W. R. Cotton
,
L. Di Girolamo
,
B. Geerts
,
H. Gerber
,
S. Göke
,
L. Gomes
,
B. G. Heikes
,
J. G. Hudson
,
P. Kollias
,
R. R Lawson
,
S. K. Krueger
,
D. H. Lenschow
,
L. Nuijens
,
D. W. O'Sullivan
,
R. A. Rilling
,
D. C. Rogers
,
A. P. Siebesma
,
E. Snodgrass
,
J. L. Stith
,
D. C. Thornton
,
S. Tucker
,
C. H. Twohy
, and
P. Zuidema

Shallow, maritime cumuli are ubiquitous over much of the tropical oceans, and characterizing their properties is important to understanding weather and climate. The Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field campaign, which took place during November 2004–January 2005 in the trades over the western Atlantic, emphasized measurements of processes related to the formation of rain in shallow cumuli, and how rain subsequently modifies the structure and ensemble statistics of trade wind clouds. Eight weeks of nearly continuous S-band polarimetric radar sampling, 57 flights from three heavily instrumented research aircraft, and a suite of ground- and ship-based instrumentation provided data on trade wind clouds with unprecedented resolution. Observational strategies employed during RICO capitalized on the advances in remote sensing and other instrumentation to provide insight into processes that span a range of scales and that lie at the heart of questions relating to the cause and effects of rain from shallow maritime cumuli.

Full access