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Charles F. Brooks
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Charles F. Brooks
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por Charles F. Brooks
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CHARLES F. BROOKS

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Charles F. Brooks
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CHARLES F. BROOKS

Abstract

The appearance of mammato-cumulus clouds, whether formed at high or low levels, shows that they are formed by local downward thrusts of air. Those associated with overflow sheets of thunderstorms are obviously formed of snow, which accounts for the slowness with which they change shape. While minor developments are not uncommon. the large, well-developed festoons of this class are associated only with the most severe thunderstorms.

On the boundary between two general winds, interference and initial condensation of moisture as a result of the projection of masses of the upper mammato-cumulus into the lower wind, occasionally form. If the upper wind is the colder, convection quickly destroys the mammato formation. If the lower current is already cloudy, cold air from above, especially if dry, may blow “cheese holes” through it.

The most impressive mammato-cumulus is the low, downward boiling cloud surface which marks the top of a cool, squall wind.

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CHARLES F. BROOKS

Abstract

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CHARLES F. BROOKS

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Charles F. Brooks
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CHARLES F. BROOKS

Abstract

No Abstract Available.

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