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Shi-Xin Wang, Hong-Chao Zuo, Fen Sun, Li-Yang Wu, Yixing Yin, and Jing-Jia Luo

Abstract

Dynamics of the East Asian spring rainband are investigated with a reanalysis dataset and station observations. Here, it is revealed that the rainband is anchored by external forcings. The midtropospheric jet core stays quasi-stationary around Japan. It has two branches in its entry region, which originate from the south and north flanks of the Tibetan Plateau and then run northeastward and southeastward, respectively. The southern branch advects warm air from the Tibetan–Hengduan Plateau northeastward, forming a rainband over southern China through causing adiabatic ascent motion and triggering diabatic feedback. The rainband is much stronger in spring than in autumn due to the stronger diabatic heating over the Tibetan–Hengduan Plateau, a more southward-displaced midtropospheric jet, and the resulting stronger warm advection over southern China. The northern jet branch forms a zonally elongated cold advection belt, which reaches a maximum around northern China, and then weakens and extends eastward to east of Japan. The westerly jet also steers strong disturbance activities roughly collocated with the cold advection belt via baroclinic instability. The high disturbance activities belt causes large cumulative warm advection (CWA) through drastically increasing extremely warm advection days on its eastern and south flanks, where weak cold advection prevails. CWA is more essential for monthly/seasonally rainfall than conventionally used time-average temperature advection because it is shown that strengthened warm advection can increase rainfall through positive diabatic feedback, while cold advection cannot cause negative rainfall. Thus, the rainband is collocated with the large CWA belt instead of the warm advection south of it. This rainband is jointed to the rainband over southern China, forming the long southwest–northeast-oriented East Asian spring rainband. Increasing moisture slightly displaces the rainband southeastward.

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Fang-Fang Li, Ying-Hui Jia, Guang-Qian Wang, and Jun Qiu

Abstract

Sound waves have proven to be effective in promoting the interaction and aggregation of droplets. It is necessary to theoretically study the motion of particles in a sound field to develop new acoustic technology for precipitation enhancement. In this paper, the motion of cloud droplets due to a traveling sound wave field emitted from the ground to the air is simulated using the motion equation of point particles. The force condition of the particles in the oscillating flow field is analyzed. Meanwhile, the effects of droplet size, sound frequency, and sound pressure level (SPL) on the velocity and displacement of the droplets are also investigated. The results show that Stokes force and gravity play a dominant role in the falling process of cloud droplets, and the effect of the sound wave is mainly reflected in the fluctuation of velocity and displacement, which also promotes the displacement of cloud droplets to a certain extent. The maximum displacement increments of cloud droplets of 10 µm can reach 9200 µm due to the action of sound waves of 50 Hz and 143.4 dB. The SPL required for a noticeable velocity fluctuation for droplets of 10 µm with frequency of 50 Hz is 88.2 dB. When SPL < 100 dB and frequency > 500 Hz, the effect is negligible. The cloud droplet size plays a significant role in the motion, and the sound action is weaker for larger particles. For a smaller sound frequency and higher SPL, the effect of the sound wave is more prominent.

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Sarah Strazzo, Dan C. Collins, Andrew Schepen, Q. J. Wang, Emily Becker, and Liwei Jia

Abstract

Recent research demonstrates that dynamical models sometimes fail to represent observed teleconnection patterns associated with predictable modes of climate variability. As a result, model forecast skill may be reduced. We address this gap in skill through the application of a Bayesian postprocessing technique—the calibration, bridging, and merging (CBaM) method—which previously has been shown to improve probabilistic seasonal forecast skill over Australia. Calibration models developed from dynamical model reforecasts and observations are employed to statistically correct dynamical model forecasts. Bridging models use dynamical model forecasts of relevant climate modes (e.g., ENSO) as predictors of remote temperature and precipitation. Bridging and calibration models are first developed separately using Bayesian joint probability modeling and then merged using Bayesian model averaging to yield an optimal forecast. We apply CBaM to seasonal forecasts of North American 2-m temperature and precipitation from the North American Multimodel Ensemble (NMME) hindcast. Bridging is done using the model-predicted Niño-3.4 index. Overall, the fully merged CBaM forecasts achieve higher Brier skill scores and better reliability compared to raw NMME forecasts. Bridging enhances forecast skill for individual NMME member model forecasts of temperature, but does not result in significant improvements in precipitation forecast skill, possibly because the models of the NMME better represent the ENSO–precipitation teleconnection pattern compared to the ENSO–temperature pattern. These results demonstrate the potential utility of the CBaM method to improve seasonal forecast skill over North America.

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Joshua-Xiouhua Fu, Wanqiu Wang, Yuejian Zhu, Hong-Li Ren, Xiaolong Jia, and Toshiaki Shinoda

Abstract

Six sets of hindcasts conducted with the NCEP GFS have been used to study the SST-feedback processes and assess the relative contributions of atmospheric internal dynamics and SST feedback on the October and November MJO events observed during the DYNAMO IOP (Oct- and Nov-MJO). The hindcasts are carried out with three variants of the Arakawa–Shubert cumulus scheme under TMI and climatological SST conditions. The positive intraseasonal SST anomaly along with its convergent Laplacian produces systematic surface disturbances, which include enhanced surface convergence, evaporation, and equivalent potential temperature no matter which cumulus scheme is used. Whether these surface disturbances can grow into a robust response of MJO convection depends on the characteristics of the cumulus schemes used. If the cumulus scheme is able to amplify the SST-initiated surface disturbances through a strong upward–downward feedback, the model is able to produce a robust MJO convection response to the underlying SST anomaly; otherwise, the model will not produce any significant SST feedback. A new method has been developed to quantify the “potential” and “practical” contributions of the atmospheric internal dynamics and SST feedback on the MJOs. The present results suggest that, potentially, the SST feedback could have larger contributions than the atmospheric internal dynamics. Practically, the contributions to the Oct- and Nov-MJO events are, respectively, dominated by atmospheric internal dynamics and SST feedback. Averaged over the entire period, the contributions from the atmospheric internal dynamics and SST feedback are about half and half.

Open access
Jia Wang, James Kessler, Xuezhi Bai, Anne Clites, Brent Lofgren, Alexandre Assuncao, John Bratton, Philip Chu, and George Leshkevich

Abstract

In this study, decadal variability of ice cover in the Great Lakes is investigated using historical airborne and satellite measurements from 1963 to 2017. It was found that Great Lakes ice cover has 1) a linear relationship with the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO), similar to the relationship of lake ice cover with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), but with stronger impact than NAO; 2) a quadratic relationship with the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), which is similar to the relationship of lake ice cover to Niño-3.4, but with opposite curvature; and 3) decadal variability with a positive (warming) trend in AMO contributes to the decreasing trend in lake ice cover. Composite analyses show that during the positive (negative) phase of AMO, the Great Lakes experience a warm (cold) anomaly in surface air temperature (SAT) and lake surface temperature (LST), leading to less (more) ice cover. During the positive (negative) phase of PDO, the Great Lakes experience a cold (warm) anomaly in SAT and LST, leading to more (less) ice cover. Based on these statistical relationships, the original multiple variable regression model established using the indices of NAO and Niño-3.4 only was improved by adding both AMO and PDO, as well as their interference (interacting or competing) mechanism. With the AMO and PDO added, the correlation between the model and observation increases to 0.69, compared to 0.48 using NAO and Niño-3.4 only. When November lake surface temperature was further added to the regression model, the prediction skill of the coming winter ice cover increased even more.

Open access
Lei Wang, Tandong Yao, Chenhao Chai, Lan Cuo, Fengge Su, Fan Zhang, Zhijun Yao, Yinsheng Zhang, Xiuping Li, Jia Qi, Zhidan Hu, Jingshi Liu, and Yuanwei Wang

Abstract

Monitoring changes in river runoff at the Third Pole (TP) is important because rivers in this region support millions of inhabitants in Asia and are very sensitive to climate change. Under the influence of climate change and intensified cryospheric melt, river runoff has changed markedly at the TP, with significant effects on the spatial and temporal water resource distribution that threaten water supply and food security for people living downstream. Despite some in situ observations and discharge estimates from state-of-the-art remote sensing technology, the total river runoff (TRR) for the TP has never been reliably quantified, and its response to climate change remains unclear. As part of the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ “Pan-Third Pole Environment Study for a Green Silk Road,” the TP-River project aims to construct a comprehensive runoff observation network at mountain outlets (where rivers leave the mountains and enter the plains) for 13 major rivers in the TP region, thereby enabling TRR to be accurately quantified. The project also integrates discharge estimates from remote sensing and cryosphere–hydrology modeling to investigate long-term changes in TRR and the relationship between the TRR variations and westerly/monsoon. Based on recent efforts, the project provides the first estimate (656 ± 23 billion m3) of annual TRR for the 13 TP rivers in 2018. The annual river runoff at the mountain outlets varies widely between the different TP rivers, ranging from 2 to 176 billion m3, with higher values mainly corresponding to rivers in the Indian monsoon domain, rather than in the westerly domain.

Open access
Rongqing Han, Hui Wang, Zeng-Zhen Hu, Arun Kumar, Weijing Li, Lindsey N. Long, Jae-Kyung E. Schemm, Peitao Peng, Wanqiu Wang, Dong Si, Xiaolong Jia, Ming Zhao, Gabriel A. Vecchi, Timothy E. LaRow, Young-Kwon Lim, Siegfried D. Schubert, Suzana J. Camargo, Naomi Henderson, Jeffrey A. Jonas, and Kevin J. E. Walsh

Abstract

An assessment of simulations of the interannual variability of tropical cyclones (TCs) over the western North Pacific (WNP) and its association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO), as well as a subsequent diagnosis for possible causes of model biases generated from simulated large-scale climate conditions, are documented in the paper. The model experiments are carried out by the Hurricane Work Group under the U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability Research Program (CLIVAR) using five global climate models (GCMs) with a total of 16 ensemble members forced by the observed sea surface temperature and spanning the 28-yr period from 1982 to 2009. The results show GISS and GFDL model ensemble means best simulate the interannual variability of TCs, and the multimodel ensemble mean (MME) follows. Also, the MME has the closest climate mean annual number of WNP TCs and the smallest root-mean-square error to the observation.

Most GCMs can simulate the interannual variability of WNP TCs well, with stronger TC activities during two types of El Niño—namely, eastern Pacific (EP) and central Pacific (CP) El Niño—and weaker activity during La Niña. However, none of the models capture the differences in TC activity between EP and CP El Niño as are shown in observations. The inability of models to distinguish the differences in TC activities between the two types of El Niño events may be due to the bias of the models in response to the shift of tropical heating associated with CP El Niño.

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Agus Santoso, Harry Hendon, Andrew Watkins, Scott Power, Dietmar Dommenget, Matthew H. England, Leela Frankcombe, Neil J. Holbrook, Ryan Holmes, Pandora Hope, Eun-Pa Lim, Jing-Jia Luo, Shayne McGregor, Sonja Neske, Hanh Nguyen, Acacia Pepler, Harun Rashid, Alex Sen Gupta, Andréa S. Taschetto, Guomin Wang, Esteban Abellán, Arnold Sullivan, Maurice F. Huguenin, Felicity Gamble, and Francois Delage

Abstract

El Niño and La Niña, the warm and cold phases of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO), cause significant year-to-year disruptions in global climate, including in the atmosphere, oceans, and cryosphere. Australia is one of the countries where its climate, including droughts and flooding rains, is highly sensitive to the temporal and spatial variations of ENSO. The dramatic impacts of ENSO on the environment, society, health, and economies worldwide make the application of reliable ENSO predictions a powerful way to manage risks and resources. An improved understanding of ENSO dynamics in a changing climate has the potential to lead to more accurate and reliable ENSO predictions by facilitating improved forecast systems. This motivated an Australian national workshop on ENSO dynamics and prediction that was held in Sydney, Australia, in November 2017. This workshop followed the aftermath of the 2015/16 extreme El Niño, which exhibited different characteristics to previous extreme El Niños and whose early evolution since 2014 was challenging to predict. This essay summarizes the collective workshop perspective on recent progress and challenges in understanding ENSO dynamics and predictability and improving forecast systems. While this essay discusses key issues from an Australian perspective, many of the same issues are important for other ENSO-affected countries and for the international ENSO research community.

Open access
Stephen Baxter, Gerald D Bell, Eric S Blake, Francis G Bringas, Suzana J Camargo, Lin Chen, Caio A. S Coelho, Ricardo Domingues, Stanley B Goldenberg, Gustavo Goni, Nicolas Fauchereau, Michael S Halpert, Qiong He, Philip J Klotzbach, John A Knaff, Michelle L'Heureux, Chris W Landsea, I.-I Lin, Andrew M Lorrey, Jing-Jia Luo, Andrew D Magee, Richard J Pasch, Petra R Pearce, Alexandre B Pezza, Matthew Rosencrans, Blair C Trewin, Ryan E Truchelut, Bin Wang, H Wang, Kimberly M Wood, and John-Mark Woolley
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