Search Results

You are looking at 41 - 50 of 60 items for

  • Author or Editor: Sumant Nigam x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas
and
Sumant Nigam

Abstract

The Mekong River is the lifeblood of the Southeast (SE) Asian economies. In situ and satellite-based precipitation are analyzed to assess the amount of water received as precipitation in the river basin (Mekong basin water), in particular, the amount each country receives. Laos, Thailand, and Cambodia contribute ~75% of the basin water during March–September, whereas China’s contribution is 10%–15%, except in winter when it rises to 25%. The processing of Mekong basin water into Mekong streamflow entails accounting for the uncertain water losses but, interestingly, interannual variations in Mekong basin water can be processed into Mekong streamflow using a simple hydrologic model, which is validated using monthly river discharge data from four stations. Preliminary evidence for the impact of upbasin dams on downstream flow, especially the timing of peak summer flow, is presented. Characterization of El Niño’s influence on SE Asian rainfall reveals significant rainfall reductions in the fall preceding and the spring following El Niño’s peak phase (winter); such reductions at the bookends of the dry season in SE Asia (winter) generate droughts, as in 2015–16. The linear trend in twentieth-century rainfall assesses the vulnerability of the region to climate change. The analysis indicates the feasibility of streamflow prediction using a simple hydrologic model driven by high-resolution precipitation observations and forecasts. It raises the prospects of drought prediction based on El Niño’s emergence/forecast. Finally, by showing the Mekong to be largely a rain-fed and not snowmelt-fed river, it provides quantitative context for assessing the notion of Chinese control on the lower Mekong via upbasin dams.

Full access
Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas
,
James A. Carton
, and
Sumant Nigam

Abstract

A search for coupled modes of atmosphere–ocean interaction in the tropical Atlantic sector is presented. Previous studies have provided conflicting indications of the existence of coupled modes in this region. The subject is revisited through a rotated principal component analysis performed on datasets spanning the 36-yr period 1958–93. The analysis includes four variables, sea surface temperature, oceanic heat content, wind stress, and atmospheric diabatic heating. The authors find that the first rotated principal component is associated with fluctuations in the subtropical wind system and correlates with the North Atlantic oscillation (NAO), while the second and third modes, which are the focus of interest, are related to tropical variability.

The second mode is the Atlantic Niño mode with anomalous sea surface temperature and anomalous heat content in the eastern equatorial basin. Wind stress weakens to the west of anomalously warm water, while convection is shifted south and eastward. Surface and upper-level wind anomalies of this mode resemble those of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events. When the analysis is limited to boreal summer, the season of maximum amplitude, the Atlantic Niño mode explains 7.5% of the variance of the five variables. Thermodynamic air–sea interactions do not seem to play a role for this mode.

The third mode is associated with an interhemispheric gradient of anomalous sea surface temperature and a dipole pattern of atmospheric heating. In its positive phase anomalous heating occurs over the warmer Northern Hemisphere with divergence aloft shifting convection to the north and west of the equator and intensifying the subtropical jet stream, while descending motion occurs on the western side of the Southern Hemisphere. Surface and subsurface structures in the ocean are controlled by surface winds. This interhemispheric mode is strongest in boreal spring when it explains 9.1% of the combined variance of the five variables. Thermodynamic air–sea interactions do seem to control the associated sea surface temperature anomalies, although equatorial dynamics may play a role as well.

The authors also examine the connection of the tropical Atlantic to other basins. ENSO events cause patterns of winds, heating, and sea surface temperatures resembling the interhemispheric mode described above. The lag between changes in the Atlantic and Pacific is 4–5 months for the interhemispheric mode. In contrast, no significant impact of ENSO is found on the Atlantic Niño mode. Likewise, no impact of the midlatitude North Atlantic (the NAO) is found on the Tropics, but some impact of the Tropics is found on the midlatitude North Atlantic.

Full access
Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas
,
James A. Carton
, and
Sumant Nigam

Abstract

This paper explores climate variability of the lower troposphere and boundary layer in the tropical Atlantic sector through a series of modeling simulations with a diagnostic primitive equation model. The focus is on the role that realistic diabatic heating and its vertical placement as well as surface temperature have in inducing/reinforcing the local monthly wind circulation, the role that thermal and momentum transients play in the Tropics, the potential for feedbacks, and the way through which other basins influence the tropical Atlantic region. NCEP–NCAR reanalysis data for the period 1958–93 are used to provide forcing and model verification.

In the first part of the paper local effects are considered. It is found that the most important terms controlling anomalous surface winds over the ocean are boundary layer temperature gradients and diabatic heating anomalies at low levels (below 780 mb). Anomalous diabatic heating at mid- and upper levels (430–690 mb) contributes to the near-surface circulation poleward of 15° over the warm hemisphere. Anomalous diabatic heating over the African continent influences zonal winds well into the ocean. It is found that the anomalies of surface latent heat flux induced by the interhemispheric distribution of anomalies provide positive feedback on both sides of the equator, in the deep Tropics and west of 20°W. It provides negative feedback off the northwest coast of Africa.

In the second part the relative importance of remote forcing is considered. It is found that anomalous heating associated with interhemispheric gradients of surface temperature in the tropical Atlantic influence winds in the northern extratropics in a wavelike pattern during boreal spring. Anomalous heating associated with equatorial anomalies of surface temperature influence winds in the southern extratropics in a wavelike pattern during boreal summer. In contrast, the influence of heating in the midlatitudes is confined to the northern subtropics. Anomalous ENSO-related diabatic heating influences near-surface winds in the tropical Atlantic, which resembles the local response to interhemispheric gradients of surface temperature. This remote influence induces changes in the intensity of the Atlantic Walker and Hadley circulations as a consequence of the direct effect of heating in the eastern tropical Pacific.

Full access
Massimo Bollasina
,
Sumant Nigam
, and
K-M. Lau

Abstract

The South Asian haze builds up from December to May, is mostly of anthropogenic origin, and absorbs part of the solar radiation. The influence of interannual variations of absorbing aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic Plain in May on the Indian summer monsoon is characterized by means of an observational analysis. Insight into how the aerosol impact is generated is also provided.

It is shown that anomalous aerosol loading in late spring leads to remarkable and large-scale variations in the monsoon evolution. Excessive aerosols in May lead to reduced cloud amount and precipitation, increased surface shortwave radiation, and land surface warming. The June (and July) monsoon anomaly associated with excessive May aerosols is of opposite sign over much of the subcontinent (although with a different pattern) with respect to May. The monsoon strengthens in June (and July).

The analysis suggests that the significant large-scale aerosol influence on monsoon circulation and hydroclimate is mediated by the heating of the land surface, pursuant to reduced cloudiness and precipitation in May. The finding of the significant role of the land surface in the realization of the aerosol impact is somewhat novel.

Full access
Scott J. Weaver
,
Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas
, and
Sumant Nigam

Abstract

The evolution of the atmospheric and land surface states during extreme hydroclimate episodes over North America is investigated using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR), which additionally, and successfully, assimilates precipitation. The pentad-resolution portrayals of the atmospheric and terrestrial water balance over the U.S. Great Plains during the 1988 summer drought and the July 1993 floods are analyzed to provide insight into the operative mechanisms including regional circulation (e.g., the Great Plains low-level jet, or GPLLJ) and hydroclimate (e.g., precipitation, evaporation, soil moisture recharge, runoff).

The submonthly (but supersynoptic time scale) fluctuations of the GPLLJ are found to be very influential, through related moisture transport and kinematic convergence (e.g., ∂υ/∂y), with the jet anomalies in the southern plains leading the northern precipitation and related moisture flux convergence, accounting for two-thirds of the dry and wet episode precipitation amplitude. The soil moisture influence on hydroclimate evolution is assessed to be marginal as evaporation anomalies are found to lag precipitation ones, a lead–lag not discernible at monthly resolution. The pentad analysis thus corroborates the authors’ earlier findings on the importance of transported moisture over local evaporation in Great Plains’ summer hydroclimate variability.

The regional water budgets—atmospheric and terrestrial—are found to be substantially unbalanced, with the terrestrial imbalance being unacceptably large. Pentad analysis shows the atmospheric imbalance to arise from the sluggishness of the NARR evaporation, including its overestimation in wet periods. The larger terrestrial imbalance, on the other hand, has its origins in the striking unresponsiveness of the NARR’s runoff, which is underestimated in wet episodes.

Finally, the influence of ENSO and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) variability on the GPLLJ is quantified during the wet episode, in view of the importance of moisture transports. It is shown that a significant portion (∼25%) of the GPLLJ anomaly (and downstream precipitation) is attributable to NAO and ENSO’s influence, and that this combined influence prolongs the wet episode beyond the period of the instigating GPLLJ.

Full access
Sumant Nigam
,
Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas
, and
Léon Chafik

Abstract

Decadal pulses within the lower-frequency Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO) are a prominent but underappreciated AMO feature, representing decadal variability of the subpolar gyre (e.g., the Great Salinity Anomaly of the 1970s) and wielding notable influence on the hydroclimate of the African and American continents. Here clues are sought into their origin in the spatiotemporal development of the Gulf Stream’s (GS) meridional excursions and sectional detachments apparent in the 1954–2012 record of ocean surface and subsurface salinity and temperature observations.

The GS excursions are tracked via meridional displacement of the 15°C isotherm at 200-m depth—the GS index—whereas the AMO’s decadal pulses are targeted through the AMO tendency, which implicitly highlights the shorter time scales of the AMO index. The GS’s northward shift is shown to be preceded by the positive phase of the low-frequency North Atlantic Oscillation (LF-NAO) and followed by a positive AMO tendency by 1.25 and 2.5 years, respectively. The temporal phasing is such that the GS’s northward shift is nearly concurrent with the AMO’s cold decadal phase (cold, fresh subpolar gyre). Ocean–atmosphere processes that can initiate phase reversal of the gyre state are discussed, starting with the reversal of the LF-NAO, leading to a mechanistic hypothesis for decadal fluctuations of the subpolar gyre.

According to the hypothesis, the fluctuation time scale is set by the self-feedback of the LF-NAO from its influence on SSTs in the seas around Greenland, and by the cross-basin transit of the GS’s detached eastern section; the latter is produced by the southward intrusion of subpolar water through the Newfoundland basin, just prior to the GS’s northward shift in the western basin.

Full access
Sumant Nigam
,
Agniv Sengupta
, and
Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas

Abstract

The Atlantic and Pacific basin are found linked in the context of multidecadal SST variability from analyses of 118 years of observational data. Recurrent spatiotemporal variability, including multidecadal modes, was identified using the extended-EOF technique in a longitudinally global domain, allowing unfettered expression of interbasin interactions. The physicality of the obtained decadal modes was assessed using fishery records and analog counts.

A three-mode structure with bi-directional interbasin links frames the new perspective on the cycling of multidecadal SST variability. The three modes are the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO), low-frequency North Atlantic Oscillation (LF-NAO), and North Pacific decadal variability [PDV-NP; resembling negative (–ve) PDO]. The two previously documented links AMO→PDV-NP (with ~12.5-yr lead) and LF-NAO→AMO (with 16-yr lead) are corroborated, while a third one, PDV-NP→(−LF-NAO) with ~6.5-yr lead, is uncovered. The interaction triad closes the loop on the cycling of multidecadal SST variability, generating AMO’s phase reversal in ~35 years, consistent with its widely noted ~70-yr time scale. The two previously noted links—one intrabasin and one interbasin—were unsuccessful in this regard.

Other findings include the deeper subsurface extensions of Atlantic multidecadal SST variability, and the hitherto unrecognized similarity of Pan-Pacific decadal variability and North Pacific Gyre Oscillation. Instrumental records, albeit short in the context of multidecadal variability, must continue to be mined for insights into the functioning of the climate system as its model representations while improving, remain inadequate.

Free access
Mathew Barlow
,
Sumant Nigam
, and
Ernesto H. Berbery

Abstract

A dynamically oriented description of the North American summer monsoon system, which encompasses the Mexican monsoon and the associated large-scale circulation over the continental United States, is provided by developing an evolution climatology of the precipitation, tropospheric circulation, moisture fluxes, diabatic heating, convective environment, and the adjoining basin SSTs.

A distinguishing aspect of this study is the amount of independent data analyzed, such as the newly available European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalyses, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalyses, both satellite-derived and station data–based precipitation estimates, and the heating diagnosed from both reanalyses. This also provides a preliminary evaluation and comparison of the newly available NCEP and ECMWF reanalyses at the regional level, including the model-generated precipitation and heating distributions. The principal findings are the following.

  • The accompaniment of the Mexican monsoon onset by decreased precipitation to the east is shown to be a robust climatological feature. This striking linkage is also evident in the associated tropospheric circulation and, notably, in the upper-level heating fields. The climatological phasing of the precipitation between the two areas is coherent even at the pentad timescale.

  • While the Mexican monsoon onset is closely associated with thermodynamic favorability, the linkage to the central United States, as reflected in the vertical velocity and the low-level height fields, appears to be consistent with several possible forcings: the monsoon deep heating, the elevated heating of the North American cordillera and plateau, and orographic forcing associated with the seasonal movement of the easterlies encroaching on the North American cordillera.

  • Although both reanalyses yield a tropical-type deep tropospheric heating distribution in the Mexican monsoon region and, therefore, a potentially prominent role for the monsoon in the regional circulation, the considerable differences in the diagnosed heating vertical structure, thermodynamic balance, and the overall heating magnitude between the two reanalyses, and even between the NCEP reanalysis-consistent heating and the NCEP model-produced heating, suggest potentially significant differences in the implied dynamics of the North American monsoon system.

Full access
Ernesto Muñoz
,
Antonio J. Busalacchi
,
Sumant Nigam
, and
Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas

Abstract

The Caribbean region shows maxima in easterly winds greater than 12 m s−1 at 925 hPa in July and February, herein referred to as the summer and winter Caribbean low-level jet (LLJ), respectively. It is important to understand the controls and influences of the Caribbean LLJ because other LLJs have been observed to be related to precipitation variability. The purpose of this study is to identify the mechanisms of the Caribbean LLJ formation and variability and their association to the regional hydroclimate. Climatological fields are calculated from the North American Regional Reanalysis and the 40-yr ECMWF Re-Analysis from 1979 to 2001. It is observed that the low-level (925 hPa) zonal wind over the Caribbean basin has a semiannual cycle and an interannual variability, with greater standard deviation during boreal summer. The semiannual cycle has peaks in February and July, which are regional amplifications of the large-scale circulation. High mountains to the south of the Caribbean Sea influence the air temperature meridional gradient, providing a baroclinic structure that favors a stronger easterly wind. The boreal summer strengthening of the Caribbean LLJ is associated with subsidence over the subtropical North Atlantic from the May-to-July shift of the ITCZ and the evolution of the Central American monsoon. Additionally, the midsummer minimum of Caribbean precipitation is related to the Caribbean LLJ through greater moisture flux divergence. From May to September the moisture carried by the Caribbean LLJ into the Gulf of Mexico is strongest. The summer interannual variability of the Caribbean LLJ is due to the variability of the meridional pressure gradient across the Caribbean basin, influenced by tropical Pacific variability during summer.

Full access
Kristopher B. Karnauskas
,
Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas
,
Sumant Nigam
, and
Antonio J. Busalacchi

Abstract

The Palmer drought severity index (PDSI) monitors meteorological and surface hydrological parameters to represent the severity of drought conditions. PDSI datasets are developed for the NCEP North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the 40-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-40) to facilitate North American drought research with these datasets. The drought index calculation, in particular, allows diagnostic assessment of the relative contributions of various surface water balance terms in generation of drought conditions by selectively holding these terms to their climatological value in PDSI computations. The length of the diagnosed PDSI permits analysis of subdecadal time-scale variability, such as ENSO, whose influence on North American drought evolution is investigated. ENSO’s considerable drought impact is potentially predictable, especially in the southern half of the United States.

Full access