Search Results

You are looking at 81 - 90 of 136 items for

  • Author or Editor: Yao Yao x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
George Tselioudis, Anthony D. DelGenio, William Kovari Jr., and Mao-Sung Yao

Abstract

A current-climate simulation of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, which includes interactive cloud optical properties that depend on the predicted cloud water content, is analyzed to document the variations of low cloud optical thickness with temperature in the model atmosphere. It is found that low cloud optical thickness decreases with temperature in the warm subtropical and tropical latitudes and increases with temperature in the cold midlatitude regions. This behavior is in agreement with the results of two observational studies that analyzed satellite data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager datasets. The increase of low cloud optical thickness with temperature in the midlatitudes is due to vertical extent and cloud water increases, whereas the decrease with temperature in the warm latitudes is due to decreases in cloud water content and happens despite increases in cloud vertical extent. The cloud processes that produce the cloud property changes in the model also vary with latitude. In the midlatitude regions relative-humidity-induced increases of cloud vertical extent with temperature dominate, whereas in the Tropics increases in cloud-top entrainment and precipitation with temperature produce decreases of cloud water content, whose effect on optical thickness outweighs the effect of entrainment-induced increases of cloud vertical extent with temperature. Doubled-CO2 simulations with the GISS GCM suggest that even though low cloud optical thickness changes have little effect on the global climate sensitivity of the model, they redistribute the temperature change and reduce the high-latitude amplification of the greenhouse warming. It is also found that the current-climate variations of low cloud optical thickness with temperature reproduce qualitatively but overestimate quantitatively the changes in optical thickness with climate warming.

Full access
Anthony D. Del Genio, Yonghua Chen, Daehyun Kim, and Mao-Sung Yao

Abstract

The relationship between convective penetration depth and tropospheric humidity is central to recent theories of the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO). It has been suggested that general circulation models (GCMs) poorly simulate the MJO because they fail to gradually moisten the troposphere by shallow convection and simulate a slow transition to deep convection. CloudSat and Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) data are analyzed to document the variability of convection depth and its relation to water vapor during the MJO transition from shallow to deep convection and to constrain GCM cumulus parameterizations. Composites of cloud occurrence for 10 MJO events show the following anticipated MJO cloud structure: shallow and congestus clouds in advance of the peak, deep clouds near the peak, and upper-level anvils after the peak. Cirrus clouds are also frequent in advance of the peak. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (EOS) (AMSR-E) column water vapor (CWV) increases by ~5 mm during the shallow–deep transition phase, consistent with the idea of moisture preconditioning. Echo-top height of clouds rooted in the boundary layer increases sharply with CWV, with large variability in depth when CWV is between ~46 and 68 mm. International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud classifications reproduce these climatological relationships but correctly identify congestus-dominated scenes only about half the time. A version of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies Model E2 (GISS-E2) GCM with strengthened entrainment and rain evaporation that produces MJO-like variability also reproduces the shallow–deep convection transition, including the large variability of cloud-top height at intermediate CWV values. The variability is due to small grid-scale relative humidity and lapse rate anomalies for similar values of CWV.

Full access
Jeng-Lin Tsai, Ben-Jei Tsuang, Po-Sheng Lu, Ming-Hwi Yao, and Yuan Shen

Abstract

Many meteorological and air-quality models require land characteristics as inputs. A field experiment was conducted to study the surface energy budget of a rice paddy in Taiwan. During the day, the energy balance ratio measured by an eddy covariance (EC) system was found to be 95% after considering the photosynthetic and local advected heat fluxes. The observations by the EC system suggest that the Bowen ratio was about 0.18 during the daytime. The EC system also measured the daytime absorbed carbon dioxide flux. The equivalent photosynthetic energy flux was about 1% of the net solar radiation. A reference table describing the land characteristics of rice paddies for use in meteorological and air-quality models is listed that shows that the albedo and the Bowen ratio measured over rice paddies were lower than those listed in many state-of-the-art models. This study proposes simulating latent heat flux by assigning proper values for canopy resistance rather than by assigning constant values for Bowen ratio or surface moisture availability. The diurnal pattern of the canopy resistance of the rice paddy was found to be “U” shaped. Daytime canopy resistance was observed to be 87 s m−1, and a high canopy resistance (∼900 s m−1) should be assigned during nighttime periods.

Full access
Junchen Yao, Frédéric Vitart, Magdalena Alonso Balmaseda, Tongwen Wu, and Xiangwen Liu

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of coupled initialization on the extended-range prediction of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). A set of reforecasts using combinations of the oceanic and atmospheric initial conditions produced with coupled and uncoupled data assimilation (DA) are conducted to evaluate the impact of coupling in the different domains, from the perspective of MJO forecasts. The coupled initial conditions are provided by CERA-SAT pilot coupled reanalysis for the satellite era recently produced by ECMWF. We focus on the prediction skill of the MJO using the Real-time Outgoing Long-wave Radiation (OLR) MJO index in a series of re-forecasts. The impact of atmospheric initial conditions produced by coupled DA shows slight benefit for the MJO prediction. However, compared with the operational ocean reanalysis, the ocean initial conditions created by CERA-SAT degrade the MJO prediction skill during the first 2-3 weeks of the re-forecast by 1.5% to 5.8%. A moist static energy budget analysis revealed that the underestimation of 0.2 K sea surface temperature, 1.4 W m-2 top of atmosphere downward longwave radiation, and 3.8 W m-2 latent heat flux over the Maritime Continent lead to small but statistically significant degradation of the MJO forecast skill. The results demonstrate that the MJO is sensitive to ocean initial conditions, and illustrate the value of the extended range MJO prediction for evaluating the quality of coupled data assimilation, and suggest that future efforts on coupled data assimilation pay special attention to the balance of air-sea interaction processes over the warm pool area, in terms of modeling, observational needs and system.

Restricted access
Anthony D. Del Genio, Yonghua Chen, Daehyun Kim, and Mao-Sung Yao
Full access
Andrea I. Flossmann, Michael Manton, Ali Abshaev, Roelof Bruintjes, Masataka Murakami, Thara Prabhakaran, and Zhanyu Yao

Abstract

This paper provides a summary of the assessment report of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Expert Team on Weather Modification that discusses recent progress on precipitation enhancement research. The progress has been underpinned by advances in our understanding of cloud processes and interactions between clouds and their environment, which, in turn, have been enabled by substantial developments in technical capabilities to both observe and simulate clouds from the microphysical to the mesoscale. We focus on the two cloud types most commonly seeded in the past: winter orographic cloud systems and convective cloud systems. A key issue for cloud seeding is the extension from cloud-scale research to water catchment–scale impacts on precipitation on the ground. Consequently, the requirements for the design, implementation, and evaluation of a catchment-scale precipitation enhancement campaign are discussed. The paper concludes by indicating the most important gaps in our knowledge. Some recommendations regarding the most urgent research topics are given to stimulate further research.

Open access
Ruiyang Ma, Dong Zheng, Yijun Zhang, Wen Yao, Wenjuan Zhang, and Deqing Cuomu

Abstract

Herein, we compared data on the spatiotemporal distribution of lightning activity obtained from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) with that from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS). The WWLLN and LIS both suggest intense lightning activity over the central and southeastern Tibetan Plateau (TP) during May–September. Meanwhile, the WWLLN indicates relatively weak lightning activity over the northeastern TP, where the LIS suggests very intense lightning activity, and it also indicates a high-density lightning center over the southwestern TP that is not suggested by the LIS. Furthermore, the WWLLN lightning peaks in August in terms of monthly variation and in late August in terms of 10-day variation, unlike the corresponding LIS lightning peaks of July and late June, respectively. Other observation data were also introduced into the comparison. The blackbody temperature (TBB) data from the Fengyun-2E geostationary satellite (as a proxy of deep convection) and thunderstorm-day data support the spatial distribution of the WWLLN lightning more. Meanwhile, for seasonal variation, the TBB data are more analogous to the LIS data, whereas the cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data from a local CG lightning location system are closer to the WWLLN data. It is speculated that the different WWLLN and LIS observation modes may cause their data to represent different dominant types of lightning, thereby leading to differences in the spatiotemporal distributions of their data. The results may further imply that there exist regional differences and seasonal variations in the electrical properties of thunderstorms over the TP.

Restricted access
Xiaoxin Yang, Tandong Yao, Wulin Yang, Baiqing Xu, You He, and Dongmei Qu

Abstract

The onset of the Asian summer monsoon is noticeably controversial, spatially and temporally. The stable oxygen isotope δ 18O in precipitation has long been used to trace water vapor source, particularly to capture the summer monsoon precipitation signal. The abrupt decrease of precipitation δ 18O in the Asian summer monsoon region closely corresponds to the summer monsoon onset. Two stations have therefore been set up at Guangzhou and Lulang in the East Asian summer monsoon domain to clarify the summer monsoon onset dates. Event-based precipitation δ 18O during 2007/08 is much lower at Lulang than at Guangzhou and is attributable mainly to the altitude effect offset by different isotopic compositions in marine moisture sources. The earlier appearance of low δ 18Owt at Lulang than at Guangzhou confirms the earlier summer monsoon onset in the Bay of Bengal. Isotopically identified summer monsoon evolutions from precipitation δ 18O at both stations are verifiable with NCEP–NCAR reanalysis data, indicating that precipitation δ 18O offers an alternative approach to studying the summer monsoon circulation from precipitation δ 18O.

Full access
Qiang Wang, Lili Zeng, Jian Li, Ju Chen, Yunkai He, Jinglong Yao, Dongxiao Wang, and Weidong Zhou

Abstract

Cross-shelf flow induced by mesoscale eddies has been investigated in the northern South China Sea (NSCS) using velocity observations from Long Ranger ADCP moorings. Mesoscale eddies influenced the three mooring stations during almost all the observation period. Four quadrants have been defined with the mooring location as the origin, and it is found that warm (cold) mesoscale eddies induce onshore (offshore) movement in the eastern two quadrants and offshore (onshore) movement in the western two quadrants. When an eddy propagates past a mooring station, net cross-shelf flow at the mooring station can be induced by asymmetry in the horizontal and vertical structure of the eddy and by its evolution. As an eddy propagates westward, its shape changes continually and the vertical modes also transform from high to lower modes, which contributes to the net cross-shelf flow. Based on the quasigeostrophic potential vorticity equation, it is confirmed that the net cross-shelf flow is mainly induced by the eddy evolution and suppressed by nonlinear effect. Because of dispersion characteristics of the mesoscale eddy, barotropic mode will restructure at the baroclinic mode area after separating from the baroclinic mode, which will be enhanced by topography slope.

Full access
Anthony D. Del Genio, Jingbo Wu, Audrey B. Wolf, Yonghua Chen, Mao-Sung Yao, and Daehyun Kim

Abstract

Two recent activities offer an opportunity to test general circulation model (GCM) convection and its interaction with large-scale dynamics for observed Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) events. This study evaluates the sensitivity of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM to entrainment, rain evaporation, downdrafts, and cold pools. Single Column Model versions that restrict weakly entraining convection produce the most realistic dependence of convection depth on column water vapor (CWV) during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment at Gan Island. Differences among models are primarily at intermediate CWV where the transition from shallow to deeper convection occurs. GCM 20-day hindcasts during the Year of Tropical Convection that best capture the shallow–deep transition also produce strong MJOs, with significant predictability compared to Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission data. The dry anomaly east of the disturbance on hindcast day 1 is a good predictor of MJO onset and evolution. Initial CWV there is near the shallow–deep transition point, implicating premature onset of deep convection as a predictor of a poor MJO simulation. Convection weakly moistens the dry region in good MJO simulations in the first week; weakening of large-scale subsidence over this time may also affect MJO onset. Longwave radiation anomalies are weakest in the worst model version, consistent with previous analyses of cloud/moisture greenhouse enhancement as the primary MJO energy source. The authors’ results suggest that both cloud-/moisture-radiative interactions and convection–moisture sensitivity are required to produce a successful MJO simulation.

Full access