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  • Author or Editor: A. P. Siebesma x
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R. A. J. Neggers
,
A. P. Siebesma
, and
T. Heus

Uncertainties in numerical predictions of weather and climate are often linked to the representation of unresolved processes that act relatively quickly compared to the resolved general circulation. These processes include turbulence, convection, clouds, and radiation. Single‐column model (SCM) simulation of idealized cases and the subsequent evaluation against large-eddy simulation (LES) results has become an often used and relied on method to obtain insight at process level into the behavior of such parameterization schemes; benefits of SCM simulation are the enhanced model transparency and the high computational efficiency. Although this approach has achieved demonstrable success, some shortcomings have been identified; among these, i) the statistical significance and relevance of single idealized case studies might be questioned and ii) the use of observational datasets has been relatively limited. A recently initiated project named the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) Parameterization Testbed (KPT) is part of a general move toward a more statistically significant process-level evaluation, with the purpose of optimizing the identification of problems in general circulation models that are related to parameterization schemes. The main strategy of KPT is to apply continuous long-term SCM simulation and LES at various permanent meteorological sites, in combination with comprehensive evaluation against observations at multiple time scales. We argue that this strategy enables the reproduction of typical long-term mean behavior of fast physics in large-scale models, but it still preserves the benefits of single-case studies (such as model transparency). This facilitates the tracing and understanding of errors in parameterization schemes, which should eventually lead to a reduction of related uncertainties in numerical predictions of weather and climate.

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J. Teixeira
,
B. Stevens
,
C. S. Bretherton
,
R. Cederwall
,
J. D. Doyle
,
J. C . Golaz
,
A. A. M. Holtslag
,
S. A . Klein
,
J. K. Lundquist
,
D. A. Randall
,
A. P. Siebesma
, and
P. M. M. Soares
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C.-H. Moeng
,
W. R. Cotton
,
C. Bretherton
,
A. Chlond
,
M. Khairoutdinov
,
S. Krueger
,
W. S. Lewellen
,
M. K. MacVean
,
J. R. M. Pasquier
,
H. A. Rand
,
A. P. Siebesma
,
B. Stevens
, and
R. I. Sykes

This paper reports an intercomparison study of a stratocumulus-topped planetary boundary layer (PBL) generated from ten 3D large eddy simulation (LES) codes and four 2D cloud-resolving models (CRMs). These models vary in the numerics, the parameterizations of the subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence and condensation processes, and the calculation of longwave radiative cooling. Cloud-top radiative cooling is often the major source of buoyant production of turbulent kinetic energy in the stratocumulus-topped PBL. An idealized nocturnal stratocumulus case was selected for this study. It featured a statistically horizontally homogeneous and nearly solid cloud deck with no drizzle, no solar radiation, little wind shear, and little surface heating.

Results of the two-hour simulations showed that the overall cloud structure, including cloud-top height, cloud fraction, and the vertical distributions of many turbulence statistics, compared well among all LESs despite the code variations. However, the entrainment rate was found to differ significantly among the simulations. Among the model uncertainties due to numerics, SGS turbulence, SGS condensation, and radiation, none could be identified to explain such differences. Therefore, a follow-up study will focus on simulating the entrainment process. The liquid water mixing ratio profiles also varied significantly among the simulations; these profiles are sensitive to the algorithm used for computing the saturation mixing ratio.

Despite the obvious differences in eddy structure in two- and three-dimensional simulations, the cloud structure predicted by the 2D CRMs was similar to that obtained by the 3D LESs, even though the momentum fluxes, the vertical and horizontal velocity variances, and the turbulence kinetic energy profiles predicted by the 2D CRMs all differ significantly from those of the LESs.

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Robert M. Rauber
,
Harry T. Ochs III
,
L. Di Girolamo
,
S. Göke
,
E. Snodgrass
,
Bjorn Stevens
,
Charles Knight
,
J. B. Jensen
,
D. H. Lenschow
,
R. A. Rilling
,
D. C. Rogers
,
J. L. Stith
,
B. A. Albrecht
,
P. Zuidema
,
A. M. Blyth
,
C. W. Fairall
,
W. A. Brewer
,
S. Tucker
,
S. G. Lasher-Trapp
,
O. L. Mayol-Bracero
,
G. Vali
,
B. Geerts
,
J. R. Anderson
,
B. A. Baker
,
R. P. Lawson
,
A. R. Bandy
,
D. C. Thornton
,
E. Burnet
,
J-L. Brenguier
,
L. Gomes
,
P. R. A. Brown
,
P. Chuang
,
W. R. Cotton
,
H. Gerber
,
B. G. Heikes
,
J. G. Hudson
,
P. Kollias
,
S. K. Krueger
,
L. Nuijens
,
D. W. O'Sullivan
,
A. P. Siebesma
, and
C. H. Twohy
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Robert M. Rauber
,
Bjorn Stevens
,
Harry T. Ochs III
,
Charles Knight
,
B. A. Albrecht
,
A. M. Blyth
,
C. W. Fairall
,
J. B. Jensen
,
S. G. Lasher-Trapp
,
O. L. Mayol-Bracero
,
G. Vali
,
J. R. Anderson
,
B. A. Baker
,
A. R. Bandy
,
E. Burnet
,
J.-L. Brenguier
,
W. A. Brewer
,
P. R. A. Brown
,
R Chuang
,
W. R. Cotton
,
L. Di Girolamo
,
B. Geerts
,
H. Gerber
,
S. Göke
,
L. Gomes
,
B. G. Heikes
,
J. G. Hudson
,
P. Kollias
,
R. R Lawson
,
S. K. Krueger
,
D. H. Lenschow
,
L. Nuijens
,
D. W. O'Sullivan
,
R. A. Rilling
,
D. C. Rogers
,
A. P. Siebesma
,
E. Snodgrass
,
J. L. Stith
,
D. C. Thornton
,
S. Tucker
,
C. H. Twohy
, and
P. Zuidema

Shallow, maritime cumuli are ubiquitous over much of the tropical oceans, and characterizing their properties is important to understanding weather and climate. The Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field campaign, which took place during November 2004–January 2005 in the trades over the western Atlantic, emphasized measurements of processes related to the formation of rain in shallow cumuli, and how rain subsequently modifies the structure and ensemble statistics of trade wind clouds. Eight weeks of nearly continuous S-band polarimetric radar sampling, 57 flights from three heavily instrumented research aircraft, and a suite of ground- and ship-based instrumentation provided data on trade wind clouds with unprecedented resolution. Observational strategies employed during RICO capitalized on the advances in remote sensing and other instrumentation to provide insight into processes that span a range of scales and that lie at the heart of questions relating to the cause and effects of rain from shallow maritime cumuli.

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