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  • Author or Editor: Alla Zelenyuk x
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Jerome D. Fast
,
Larry K. Berg
,
Lizbeth Alexander
,
David Bell
,
Emma D’Ambro
,
John Hubbe
,
Chongai Kuang
,
Jiumeng Liu
,
Chuck Long
,
Alyssa Matthews
,
Fan Mei
,
Rob Newsom
,
Mikhail Pekour
,
Tamara Pinterich
,
Beat Schmid
,
Siegfried Schobesberger
,
John Shilling
,
James N. Smith
,
Stephen Springston
,
Kaitlyn Suski
,
Joel A. Thornton
,
Jason Tomlinson
,
Jian Wang
,
Heng Xiao
, and
Alla Zelenyuk

Abstract

Shallow convective clouds are common, occurring over many areas of the world, and are an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget. In addition to synoptic and mesoscale meteorological conditions, land–atmosphere interactions and aerosol–radiation–cloud interactions can influence the formation of shallow clouds and their properties. These processes exhibit large spatial and temporal variability and occur at the subgrid scale for all current climate, operational forecast, and cloud-system-resolving models; therefore, they must be represented by parameterizations. Uncertainties in shallow cloud parameterization predictions arise from many sources, including insufficient coincident data needed to adequately represent the coupling of cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with inhomogeneity in the surface-layer, boundary layer, and aerosol properties. Predictions of the transition of shallow to deep convection and the onset of precipitation are also affected by errors in simulated shallow clouds. Coincident data are a key factor needed to achieve a more complete understanding of the life cycle of shallow convective clouds and to develop improved model parameterizations. To address these issues, the Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols and Land Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign was conducted near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in north-central Oklahoma during the spring and summer of 2016. We describe the scientific objectives of HI-SCALE as well as the experimental approach, overall weather conditions during the campaign, and preliminary findings from the measurements. Finally, we discuss scientific gaps in our understanding of shallow clouds that can be addressed by analysis and modeling studies that use HI-SCALE data.

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Adam C. Varble
,
Stephen W. Nesbitt
,
Paola Salio
,
Joseph C. Hardin
,
Nitin Bharadwaj
,
Paloma Borque
,
Paul J. DeMott
,
Zhe Feng
,
Thomas C. J. Hill
,
James N. Marquis
,
Alyssa Matthews
,
Fan Mei
,
Rusen Öktem
,
Vagner Castro
,
Lexie Goldberger
,
Alexis Hunzinger
,
Kevin R. Barry
,
Sonia M. Kreidenweis
,
Greg M. McFarquhar
,
Lynn A. McMurdie
,
Mikhail Pekour
,
Heath Powers
,
David M. Romps
,
Celeste Saulo
,
Beat Schmid
,
Jason M. Tomlinson
,
Susan C. van den Heever
,
Alla Zelenyuk
,
Zhixiao Zhang
, and
Edward J. Zipser

Abstract

The Cloud, Aerosol, and Complex Terrain Interactions (CACTI) field campaign was designed to improve understanding of orographic cloud life cycles in relation to surrounding atmospheric thermodynamic, flow, and aerosol conditions. The deployment to the Sierras de Córdoba range in north-central Argentina was chosen because of very frequent cumulus congestus, deep convection initiation, and mesoscale convective organization uniquely observable from a fixed site. The C-band Scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Precipitation Radar was deployed for the first time with over 50 ARM Mobile Facility atmospheric state, surface, aerosol, radiation, cloud, and precipitation instruments between October 2018 and April 2019. An intensive observing period (IOP) coincident with the RELAMPAGO field campaign was held between 1 November and 15 December during which 22 flights were performed by the ARM Gulfstream-1 aircraft. A multitude of atmospheric processes and cloud conditions were observed over the 7-month campaign, including numerous orographic cumulus and stratocumulus events; new particle formation and growth producing high aerosol concentrations; drizzle formation in fog and shallow liquid clouds; very low aerosol conditions following wet deposition in heavy rainfall; initiation of ice in congestus clouds across a range of temperatures; extreme deep convection reaching 21-km altitudes; and organization of intense, hail-containing supercells and mesoscale convective systems. These comprehensive datasets include many of the first ever collected in this region and provide new opportunities to study orographic cloud evolution and interactions with meteorological conditions, aerosols, surface conditions, and radiation in mountainous terrain.

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Indirect and Semi-direct Aerosol Campaign

The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds

Greg M. McFarquhar
,
Steven Ghan
,
Johannes Verlinde
,
Alexei Korolev
,
J. Walter Strapp
,
Beat Schmid
,
Jason M. Tomlinson
,
Mengistu Wolde
,
Sarah D. Brooks
,
Dan Cziczo
,
Manvendra K. Dubey
,
Jiwen Fan
,
Connor Flynn
,
Ismail Gultepe
,
John Hubbe
,
Mary K. Gilles
,
Alexander Laskin
,
Paul Lawson
,
W. Richard Leaitch
,
Peter Liu
,
Xiaohong Liu
,
Dan Lubin
,
Claudio Mazzoleni
,
Ann-Marie Macdonald
,
Ryan C. Moffet
,
Hugh Morrison
,
Mikhail Ovchinnikov
,
Matthew D. Shupe
,
David D. Turner
,
Shaocheng Xie
,
Alla Zelenyuk
,
Kenny Bae
,
Matt Freer
, and
Andrew Glen

Abstract

A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's primary aim was to examine the effects of aerosols, including those generated by Asian wildfires, on clouds that contain both liquid and ice. ISDAC utilized the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pro- gram's permanent observational facilities at Barrow and specially deployed instruments measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation, and radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties and collected data using an unprecedented 41 stateof- the-art cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 h on 12 different days. Aerosol compositions, including fresh and processed sea salt, biomassburning particles, organics, and sulfates mixed with organics, varied between flights. Observations in a dense arctic haze on 19 April and above, within, and below the single-layer stratocumulus on 8 and 26 April are enabling a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect arctic clouds. Inhomogeneities in reflectivity, a close coupling of upward and downward Doppler motion, and a nearly constant ice profile in the single-layer stratocumulus suggests that vertical mixing is responsible for its longevity observed during ISDAC. Data acquired in cirrus on flights between Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska, are improving the understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Ultimately, ISDAC data will improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and determine the extent to which surface measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiative heating.

A supplement to this article is available online:

DOI: 10.1175/2010BAMS2935.2

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