Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Andrew L. Pazmany x
  • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Howard B. Bluestein
and
Andrew L. Pazmany

In the spring of 1999 a field experiment was conducted in the Southern Plains of the United States, during which a mobile, millimeter-wavelength pulsed Doppler radar from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, was used by a storm-intercept team from the University of Oklahoma to collect data in tornadoes and developing tornadoes. With a 0.18° beam antenna, resolution as high as 5–10 m in the azimuthal direction was attained in a tornado on 3 May. Data collected in three supercell tornadoes are described. Features such as eyes, spiral bands, and multiple vortices/wavelike asymmetries along the edge of the eyewall are discussed. Winds approaching 80 m s−1 were resolved without folding using the polarization diversity pulse pair technique. Two tornadoes formed at an inflection point in reflectivity where the hook echo and apparent rear-flank downdraft intersected. Finescale transverse bands of reflectivity were evident in one hook echo. Data in a dust devil are also described. Numerous other datasets collected in mesocyclones are also noted. A plan for future data analysis is suggested and a plan for future experiments and upgrades to the radar are proposed.

Full access
Howard B. Bluestein
,
Andrew L. Pazmany
,
John C. Galloway
, and
Robert E. McIntosh

An experiment whose objective was to determine the wind and reflectivity substructure of severe convective storms is detailed. A 3-mm-wavelength (95 GHz) pulsed Doppler radar was installed in a van and operated in the Southern Plains of the United States during May and early June of 1993 and 1994. Using a narrow-beam antenna with computer-controlled scanning and positioning the van several kilometers from targets in severe thunderstorms, the authors were able to achieve 30-m spatial resolution and also obtain video documentation. A dual-polarization pulse-pair technique was used to realize a maximum unambiguous velocity of ±80 m s−1. Analyses of data collected in a mesocyclone near the intersection of two squall lines, in a low-precipitation storm, and in a hook echo in a supercell are discussed. A strategy to achieve 10-m spatial resolution and obtain analyses of the internal structure of tornadoes is proposed.

Full access
Zhien Wang
,
Jeffrey French
,
Gabor Vali
,
Perry Wechsler
,
Samuel Haimov
,
Alfred Rodi
,
Min Deng
,
Dave Leon
,
Jeff Snider
,
Liran Peng
, and
Andrew L. Pazmany

Clouds are a critical component of the Earth's coupled water and energy cycles. Poor understanding of cloud–radiation–dynamics feedbacks results in large uncertainties in forecasting human-induced climate changes. Better understanding of cloud microphysical and dynamical processes is critical to improving cloud parameterizations in climate models as well as in cloud-resolving models. Airborne in situ and remote sensing can make critical contributions to progress. Here, a new integrated cloud observation capability developed for the University of Wyoming King Air is described. The suite of instruments includes the Wyoming Cloud Lidar, a 183- GHz microwave radiometer, the Wyoming Cloud Radar, and in situ probes. Combined use of these remote sensor measurements yields more complete descriptions of the vertical structure of cloud microphysical properties and of cloud-scale dynamics than that attainable through ground-based remote sensing or in situ sampling alone. Together with detailed in situ data on aerosols, hydrometeors, water vapor, thermodynamic, and air motion parameters, an advanced observational capability was created to study cloud-scale processes from a single aircraft. The Wyoming Airborne Integrated Cloud Observation (WAICO) experiment was conducted to demonstrate these new capabilities and examples are presented to illustrate the results obtained.

Full access