Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Ariel E. Cohen x
  • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Daphne S. LaDue and Ariel E. Cohen

Abstract

Professional meteorologists gain a great deal of knowledge through formal education, but two factors require ongoing learning throughout a career: professionals must apply their learning to the specific subdiscipline they practice, and the knowledge and technology they rely on becomes outdated over time. It is thus inherent in professional practice that much of the learning is more or less self-directed. While these principles apply to any aspect of meteorology, this paper applies concepts to weather and climate forecasting, for which a range of resources, from many to few, for learning exist. No matter what the subdiscipline, the responsibility for identifying and pursuing opportunities for professional, lifelong learning falls to the members of the subdiscipline. Thus, it is critical that meteorologists periodically assess their ongoing learning needs and develop the ability to reflectively practice. The construct of self-directed learning and how it has been implemented in similar professions provide visions for how individual meteorologists can pursue—and how the profession can facilitate—the ongoing, self-directed learning efforts of meteorologists.

Open access
Edwin Kessler, Ariel E. Cohen, Stephen F. Corfidi, and Sarah J. Corfidi

The following essay is excerpted from conversations with Edwin Kessler, founding director of NOAA's National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman, Oklahoma, conducted by Ariel Cohen and Stephen and Sarah Corfidi of the National Weather Service's Storm Prediction Center. Cohen and the Corfidis based the discussion in part on Kessler's speech at the 50th anniversary of the School of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma in October 2010, and Cohen converted this discussion to a Q&A format. The conversations range over many subjects, including accomplishments of NSSL, Kessler's role as its manager, and the many people who were crucial to the lab's growth. The entire conversation is published by BAMS online, but here we've selected Kessler's words regarding the move to Norman, the community that evolved there, and how NSSL thrived there because of—and despite—the bureaucratic changes that federal agencies underwent at that time.—The Editors

Full access
Stephen F. Corfidi, Michael C. Coniglio, Ariel E. Cohen, and Corey M. Mead

Abstract

The word “derecho” was first used by Gustavus Hinrichs in 1888 to distinguish the widespread damaging windstorms that occurred on occasion over the mid–Mississippi Valley region of the United States from damaging winds associated with tornadoes. The term soon fell into disuse, however, and did not appear in the literature until Robert Johns and William Hirt resurrected it in the mid-1980s.

While the present definition of derecho served well during the early years of the term’s reintroduction to the meteorological community, it has several shortcomings. These have become more apparent in recent years as various studies shed light on the physical processes responsible for the production of widespread damaging winds. In particular, the current definition’s emphasis on the coverage of storm reports at the expense of identifying the convective structures and physical processes deemed responsible for the reports has led to the term being applied to wind events beyond those for which it originally was intended.

The revised definition of a derecho proposed herein is intended to focus more specifically on those types of windstorms that are the most damaging and potentially life threatening because of their intensity, sustenance, and degree of organization. The proposal is not intended to be final or all encompassing, but rather an initial step toward ultimately realizing a more complete physically based taxonomy that also addresses other forms of damaging-wind-producing convective systems.

Full access
Ariel E. Cohen, Richard L. Thompson, Steven M. Cavallo, Roger Edwards, Steven J. Weiss, John A. Hart, Israel L. Jirak, William F. Bunting, Jaret W. Rogers, Steven F. Piltz, Alan E. Gerard, Andrew D. Moore, Daniel J. Cornish, Alexander C. Boothe, and Joel B. Cohen

Abstract

During the 2014–15 academic year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center (SPC) and the University of Oklahoma (OU) School of Meteorology jointly created the first SPC-led course at OU focused on connecting traditional theory taught in the academic curriculum with operational meteorology. This class, “Applications of Meteorological Theory to Severe-Thunderstorm Forecasting,” began in 2015. From 2015 through 2017, this spring–semester course has engaged 56 students in theoretical skills and related hands-on weather analysis and forecasting applications, taught by over a dozen meteorologists from the SPC, the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory, and the NOAA National Weather Service Forecast Offices. Following introductory material, which addresses many theoretical principles relevant to operational meteorology, numerous presentations and hands-on activities focused on instructors’ areas of expertise are provided to students. Topics include the following: storm-induced perturbation pressure gradients and their enhancement to supercells, tornadogenesis, tropical cyclone tornadoes, severe wind forecasting, surface and upper-air analyses and their interpretation, and forecast decision-making. This collaborative approach has strengthened bonds between meteorologists in operations, research, and academia, while introducing OU meteorology students to the vast array of severe thunderstorm forecast challenges, state-of-the-art operational and research tools, communication of high-impact weather information, and teamwork skills. The methods of collaborative instruction and experiential education have been found to strengthen both operational–academic relationships and students’ appreciation of the intricacies of severe thunderstorm forecasting, as detailed in this article.

Open access