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M. J. Harrison
,
A. Rosati
,
B. J. Soden
,
E. Galanti
, and
E. Tziperman

Abstract

This paper presents a quantitative methodology for evaluating air–sea fluxes related to ENSO from different atmospheric products. A statistical model of the fluxes from each atmospheric product is coupled to an ocean general circulation model (GCM). Four different products are evaluated: reanalyses from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), satellite-derived data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imaging (SSM/I) platform and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), and an atmospheric GCM developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) II. For this study, comparisons between the datasets are restricted to the dominant air–sea mode.

The stability of a coupled model using only the dominant mode and the associated predictive skill of the model are strongly dependent on which atmospheric product is used. The model is unstable and oscillatory for the ECMWF product, damped and oscillatory for the NCEP and GFDL products, and unstable (nonoscillatory) for the satellite product. The ocean model is coupled with patterns of wind stress as well as heat fluxes. This distinguishes the present approach from the existing paradigm for ENSO models where surface heat fluxes are parameterized as a local damping term in the sea surface temperature (SST) equation.

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B. Soden
,
S. Tjemkes
,
J. Schmetz
,
R. Saunders
,
J. Bates
,
B. Ellingson
,
R. Engelen
,
L. Garand
,
D. Jackson
,
G. Jedlovec
,
T. Kleespies
,
D. Randel
,
P. Rayer
,
E. Salathe
,
D. Schwarzkopf
,
N. Scott
,
B. Sohn
,
S. de Souza-Machado
,
L. Strow
,
D. Tobin
,
D. Turner
,
P. van Delst
, and
T. Wehr

An intercomparison of radiation codes used in retrieving upper-tropospheric humidity (UTH) from observations in the ν2 (6.3 μm) water vapor absorption band was performed. This intercomparison is one part of a coordinated effort within the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Water Vapor Project to assess our ability to monitor the distribution and variations of upper-tropospheric moisture from spaceborne sensors. A total of 23 different codes, ranging from detailed line-by-line (LBL) models, to coarser-resolution narrowband (NB) models, to highly parameterized single-band (SB) models participated in the study. Forward calculations were performed using a carefully selected set of temperature and moisture profiles chosen to be representative of a wide range of atmospheric conditions. The LBL model calculations exhibited the greatest consistency with each other, typically agreeing to within 0.5 K in terms of the equivalent blackbody brightness temperature (Tb ). The majority of NB and SB models agreed to within ±1 K of the LBL models, although a few older models exhibited systematic Tb biases in excess of 2 K. A discussion of the discrepancies between various models, their association with differences in model physics (e.g., continuum absorption), and their implications for UTH retrieval and radiance assimilation is presented.

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D.L. Westphal
,
S. Kinne
,
P. Pilewskie
,
J.M. Alvarez
,
P. Minnis
,
D.F. Young
,
S.G. Benjamin
,
W.L. Eberhard
,
R.A. Kropfli
,
S.Y. Matrosov
,
J.B. Snider
,
T.A. Uttal
,
A.J. Heymsfield
,
G.G. Mace
,
S.H. Melfi
,
D.O'C. Starr
, and
J.J. Soden

Abstract

Observations from a wide variety of instruments and platforms are used to validate many different aspects of a three-dimensional mesoscale simulation of the dynamics, cloud microphysics, and radiative transfer of a cirrus cloud system observed on 26 November 1991 during the second cirrus field program of the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE-II) located in southeastern Kansas. The simulation was made with a mesoscale dynamical model utilizing a simplified bulk water cloud scheme and a spectral model of radiative transfer. Expressions for cirrus optical properties for solar and infrared wavelength intervals as functions of ice water content and effective particle radius are modified for the midlatitude cirrus observed during FIRE-II and are shown to compare favorably with explicit size-resolving calculations of the optical properties. Rawinsonde, Raman lidar, and satellite data are evaluated and combined to produce a time–height cross section of humidity at the central FIRE-II site for model verification. Due to the wide spacing of rawinsondes and their infrequent release, important moisture features go undetected and are absent in the conventional analyses. The upper-tropospheric humidities used for the initial conditions were generally less than 50% of those inferred from satellite data, yet over the course of a 24-h simulation the model produced a distribution that closely resembles the large-scale features of the satellite analysis. The simulated distribution and concentration of ice compares favorably with data from radar, lidar, satellite, and aircraft. Direct comparison is made between the radiative transfer simulation and data from broadband and spectral sensors and inferred quantities such as cloud albedo, optical depth, and top-of-the-atmosphere 11-µm brightness temperature, and the 6.7-µm brightness temperature. Comparison is also made with theoretical heating rates calculated using the rawinsonde data and measured ice water size distributions near the central site. For this case study, and perhaps for most other mesoscale applications, the differences between the observed and simulated radiative quantities are due more to errors in the prediction of ice water content, than to errors in the optical properties or the radiative transfer solution technique.

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Bruce A. Wielicki
,
D. F. Young
,
M. G. Mlynczak
,
K. J. Thome
,
S. Leroy
,
J. Corliss
,
J. G. Anderson
,
C. O. Ao
,
R. Bantges
,
F. Best
,
K. Bowman
,
H. Brindley
,
J. J. Butler
,
W. Collins
,
J. A. Dykema
,
D. R. Doelling
,
D. R. Feldman
,
N. Fox
,
X. Huang
,
R. Holz
,
Y. Huang
,
Z. Jin
,
D. Jennings
,
D. G. Johnson
,
K. Jucks
,
S. Kato
,
D. B. Kirk-Davidoff
,
R. Knuteson
,
G. Kopp
,
D. P. Kratz
,
X. Liu
,
C. Lukashin
,
A. J. Mannucci
,
N. Phojanamongkolkij
,
P. Pilewskie
,
V. Ramaswamy
,
H. Revercomb
,
J. Rice
,
Y. Roberts
,
C. M. Roithmayr
,
F. Rose
,
S. Sandford
,
E. L. Shirley
,
Sr. W. L. Smith
,
B. Soden
,
P. W. Speth
,
W. Sun
,
P. C. Taylor
,
D. Tobin
, and
X. Xiong

The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change benchmarks with high absolute radiometric accuracy and high statistical confidence across a wide range of essential climate variables. CLARREO's inherently high absolute accuracy will be verified and traceable on orbit to Système Internationale (SI) units. The benchmarks established by CLARREO will be critical for assessing changes in the Earth system and climate model predictive capabilities for decades into the future as society works to meet the challenge of optimizing strategies for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The CLARREO benchmarks are derived from measurements of the Earth's thermal infrared spectrum (5–50 μm), the spectrum of solar radiation reflected by the Earth and its atmosphere (320–2300 nm), and radio occultation refractivity from which accurate temperature profiles are derived. The mission has the ability to provide new spectral fingerprints of climate change, as well as to provide the first orbiting radiometer with accuracy sufficient to serve as the reference transfer standard for other space sensors, in essence serving as a “NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] in orbit.” CLARREO will greatly improve the accuracy and relevance of a wide range of space-borne instruments for decadal climate change. Finally, CLARREO has developed new metrics and methods for determining the accuracy requirements of climate observations for a wide range of climate variables and uncertainty sources. These methods should be useful for improving our understanding of observing requirements for most climate change observations.

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