Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Bruce McArthur x
  • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Atsumu Ohmura
,
Ellsworth G. Dutton
,
Bruce Forgan
,
Claus Fröhlich
,
Hans Gilgen
,
Herman Hegner
,
Alain Heimo
,
Gert König-Langlo
,
Bruce McArthur
,
Guido Müller
,
Rolf Philipona
,
Rachel Pinker
,
Charlie H. Whitlock
,
Klaus Dehne
, and
Martin Wild

To support climate research, the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) initiated a new radiometric network, the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). The network aims at providing validation material for satellite radiometry and climate models. It further aims at detecting long-term variations in irradiances at the earth's surface, which are believed to play an important role in climate change. The network and its instrumentation are designed 1) to cover major climate zones, 2) to provide the accuracy required to meet the objectives, and 3) to ensure homogenized standards for a long period in the future. The limits of the accuracy are defined to reach these goals. The suitable instruments and instrumentations have been determined and the methods for observations and data management have been agreed on at all stations. Measurements of irradiances are at 1 Hz, and the 1-min statistics (mean, standard deviation, and extreme values) with quality flags are stored at a centralized data archive at the WCRP's World Radiation Monitoring Center (WRMC) in Zurich, Switzerland. The data are quality controlled both at stations and at the WRMC. The original 1-min irradiance statistics will be stored at the WRMC for 10 years, while hourly mean values will be transferred to the World Radiation Data Center in St. Petersburg, Russia. The BSRN, consisting of 15 stations, covers the earth's surface from 80°N to 90°S, and will soon be joined by seven more stations. The data are available to scientific communities in various ways depending on the communication environment of the users. The present article discusses the scientific base, organizational and technical aspects of the network, and data retrieval methods; shows various application possibilities; and presents the future tasks to be accomplished.

Full access
Taneil Uttal
,
Sandra Starkweather
,
James R. Drummond
,
Timo Vihma
,
Alexander P. Makshtas
,
Lisa S. Darby
,
John F. Burkhart
,
Christopher J. Cox
,
Lauren N. Schmeisser
,
Thomas Haiden
,
Marion Maturilli
,
Matthew D. Shupe
,
Gijs De Boer
,
Auromeet Saha
,
Andrey A. Grachev
,
Sara M. Crepinsek
,
Lori Bruhwiler
,
Barry Goodison
,
Bruce McArthur
,
Von P. Walden
,
Edward J. Dlugokencky
,
P. Ola G. Persson
,
Glen Lesins
,
Tuomas Laurila
,
John A. Ogren
,
Robert Stone
,
Charles N. Long
,
Sangeeta Sharma
,
Andreas Massling
,
David D. Turner
,
Diane M. Stanitski
,
Eija Asmi
,
Mika Aurela
,
Henrik Skov
,
Konstantinos Eleftheriadis
,
Aki Virkkula
,
Andrew Platt
,
Eirik J. Førland
,
Yoshihiro Iijima
,
Ingeborg E. Nielsen
,
Michael H. Bergin
,
Lauren Candlish
,
Nikita S. Zimov
,
Sergey A. Zimov
,
Norman T. O’Neill
,
Pierre F. Fogal
,
Rigel Kivi
,
Elena A. Konopleva-Akish
,
Johannes Verlinde
,
Vasily Y. Kustov
,
Brian Vasel
,
Viktor M. Ivakhov
,
Yrjö Viisanen
, and
Janet M. Intrieri

Abstract

International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) activities and partnerships were initiated as a part of the 2007–09 International Polar Year (IPY) and are expected to continue for many decades as a legacy program. The IASOA focus is on coordinating intensive measurements of the Arctic atmosphere collected in the United States, Canada, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland to create synthesis science that leads to an understanding of why and not just how the Arctic atmosphere is evolving. The IASOA premise is that there are limitations with Arctic modeling and satellite observations that can only be addressed with boots-on-the-ground, in situ observations and that the potential of combining individual station and network measurements into an integrated observing system is tremendous. The IASOA vision is that by further integrating with other network observing programs focusing on hydrology, glaciology, oceanography, terrestrial, and biological systems it will be possible to understand the mechanisms of the entire Arctic system, perhaps well enough for humans to mitigate undesirable variations and adapt to inevitable change.

Full access