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  • Author or Editor: C. N. Chi x
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S. K. Kao and C. N. Chi

Abstract

An analysis of the forces and motion at 500 mb, between 30 and 60°N, in wavenumber-frequency domain, indicates that there exist definite cycles in the generation, transport and dissipation of the kinetic and available potential energies associated with long- and synoptic-scale waves. The growth and decay of the kinetic energy of long- and synoptic-scale waves are primarily controlled by the transport of kinetic energy to and from the waves through the nonlinear wave interactions, while the contribution to the kinetic energy through energy conversion tends to balance the effects of the Reynolds and frictional stresses. The evolution of the available potential energy associated with the long and synoptic waves is essentially the consequence of the transfer of thermal energy to and from the wave through the interaction between the velocity and temperature waves, while the transfer of thermal energy through the interactions between the velocity waves and the gradient of the zonal mean temperature tends to balance the effects of diabatic heating or cooling and energy conversion. The growth and decay of the kinetic energy of the zonal flow are primarily the result of the interaction between the velocity waves and the gradient of the mean zonal velocity, while the energy conversion from available potential to kinetic energy tends to balance the effects of the Reynolds and frictional stresses. The evolution of available potential energy associated with the zonal flow is essentially controlled by the interaction between the velocity waves and the gradient of the zonal mean temperature, while the effect of diabatic heating tends to balance the effect of energy conversion between the kinetic and available potential energies.

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S. K. Kao, C. N. Chi, and W. M. Washington

Abstract

An analysis of the three-dimensional, large-scale movement of air particles for the winter months with the NCAR general circulation model indicates that the horizontal movement of particles in the upper troposphere is greatly affected by wave motion in mid- and high latitudes, by the field of horizontal convergence and divergence, and by mean meridional circulation in the tropics. The mean center of mass of particles in both hemispheres generally moves toward respective poles and the mean squire of the meridional component of the particle distances generally decreases with increasing time, indicating the effect of horizontal convergence on particle movement near the subtropics. The vertical movement of the particles is affected by upward motion near the thermal equator and downward motion near the subtropical region in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The vertical dispersion is most intense in the tropics and decreases toward the poles. There are two maxima of particle accumulation, one occurring near 15°N, the other near 30°S, and a minimum accumulation of particles appears near the thermal equator, indicating the effects of the divergence field and meridional circulation between the thermal equator and the subtropics.

The mean squares of zonal, meridional and vertical components of the distance for dusty” of particles released at the equator and 45°N appear to consist of two components, a monotonicaly increasing component due essentially to the effect of turbulent diffusion, and a periodic component due primarily to the horizontal velocity convergence and divergence of mean motion.

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