Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for :

  • Author or Editor: C. R. Wood x
  • Journal of Hydrometeorology x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
H. Lievens
,
A. Al Bitar
,
N. E. C. Verhoest
,
F. Cabot
,
G. J. M. De Lannoy
,
M. Drusch
,
G. Dumedah
,
H.-J. Hendricks Franssen
,
Y. Kerr
,
S. K. Tomer
,
B. Martens
,
O. Merlin
,
M. Pan
,
M. J. van den Berg
,
H. Vereecken
,
J. P. Walker
,
E. F. Wood
, and
V. R. N. Pauwels

Abstract

The Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission routinely provides global multiangular observations of brightness temperature TB at both horizontal and vertical polarization with a 3-day repeat period. The assimilation of such data into a land surface model (LSM) may improve the skill of operational flood forecasts through an improved estimation of soil moisture SM. To accommodate for the direct assimilation of the SMOS TB data, the LSM needs to be coupled with a radiative transfer model (RTM), serving as a forward operator for the simulation of multiangular and multipolarization top of the atmosphere TBs. This study investigates the use of the Variable Infiltration Capacity model coupled with the Community Microwave Emission Modelling Platform for simulating SMOS TB observations over the upper Mississippi basin, United States. For a period of 2 years (2010–11), a comparison between SMOS TBs and simulations with literature-based RTM parameters reveals a basin-averaged bias of 30 K. Therefore, time series of SMOS TB observations are used to investigate ways for mitigating these large biases. Specifically, the study demonstrates the impact of the LSM soil moisture climatology in the magnitude of TB biases. After cumulative distribution function matching the SM climatology of the LSM to SMOS retrievals, the average bias decreases from 30 K to less than 5 K. Further improvements can be made through calibration of RTM parameters related to the modeling of surface roughness and vegetation. Consequently, it can be concluded that SM rescaling and RTM optimization are efficient means for mitigating biases and form a necessary preparatory step for data assimilation.

Full access
R. D. Koster
,
S. P. P. Mahanama
,
T. J. Yamada
,
Gianpaolo Balsamo
,
A. A. Berg
,
M. Boisserie
,
P. A. Dirmeyer
,
F. J. Doblas-Reyes
,
G. Drewitt
,
C. T. Gordon
,
Z. Guo
,
J.-H. Jeong
,
W.-S. Lee
,
Z. Li
,
L. Luo
,
S. Malyshev
,
W. J. Merryfield
,
S. I. Seneviratne
,
T. Stanelle
,
B. J. J. M. van den Hurk
,
F. Vitart
, and
E. F. Wood

Abstract

The second phase of the Global Land–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (GLACE-2) is a multi-institutional numerical modeling experiment focused on quantifying, for boreal summer, the subseasonal (out to two months) forecast skill for precipitation and air temperature that can be derived from the realistic initialization of land surface states, notably soil moisture. An overview of the experiment and model behavior at the global scale is described here, along with a determination and characterization of multimodel “consensus” skill. The models show modest but significant skill in predicting air temperatures, especially where the rain gauge network is dense. Given that precipitation is the chief driver of soil moisture, and thereby assuming that rain gauge density is a reasonable proxy for the adequacy of the observational network contributing to soil moisture initialization, this result indeed highlights the potential contribution of enhanced observations to prediction. Land-derived precipitation forecast skill is much weaker than that for air temperature. The skill for predicting air temperature, and to some extent precipitation, increases with the magnitude of the initial soil moisture anomaly. GLACE-2 results are examined further to provide insight into the asymmetric impacts of wet and dry soil moisture initialization on skill.

Full access