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  • Author or Editor: Carrie Langston x
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Jian Zhang
,
Youcun Qi
,
Carrie Langston
,
Brian Kaney
, and
Kenneth Howard

Abstract

High-resolution, accurate quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) is critical for monitoring and prediction of flash floods and is one of the most important drivers for hydrological forecasts. Rain gauges provide a direct measure of precipitation at a point, which is generally more accurate than remotely sensed observations from radar and satellite. However, high-quality, accurate precipitation gauges are expensive to maintain, and their distributions are too sparse to capture gradients of convective precipitation that may produce flash floods. Weather radars provide precipitation observations with significantly higher resolutions than rain gauge networks, although the radar reflectivity is an indirect measure of precipitation and radar-derived QPEs are subject to errors in reflectivity–rain rate (ZR) relationships. Further, radar observations are prone to blockages in complex terrain, which often result in a poor sampling of orographically enhanced precipitation. The current study aims at a synergistic approach to QPE by combining radar, rain gauge, and an orographic precipitation climatology. In the merged QPE, radar data depict high-resolution spatial distributions of the precipitation and rain gauges provide accurate precipitation measurements that correct potential biases in the radar QPE. The climatology provides a high-resolution background of the spatial precipitation distribution in the complex terrain where radar coverage is limited or nonexistent. The merging algorithm was tested on heavy precipitation events in different areas of the United States and provided a superior QPE to the individual components. The new QPE algorithm is fully automated and can be easily implemented in an operational system.

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Youcun Qi
,
Jian Zhang
,
Brian Kaney
,
Carrie Langston
, and
Kenneth Howard

Abstract

Quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) in the West Coast region of the United States has been a big challenge for Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) because of severe blockages caused by the complex terrain. The majority of the heavy precipitation in the West Coast region is associated with strong moisture flux from the Pacific that interacts with the coastal mountains. Such orographic enhancement of precipitation occurs at low levels and cannot be observed well by WSR-88D because of severe blockages. Specifically, the radar beam either samples too high above the ground or misses the orographic enhancement at lower levels, or the beam broadens with range and cannot adequately resolve vertical variations of the reflectivity structure. The current study developed an algorithm that uses S-band Precipitation Profiler (S-PROF) radar observations in northern California to improve WSR-88D QPEs in the area. The profiler data are used to calculate two sets of reference vertical profiles of reflectivity (RVPRs), one for the coastal mountains and another for the Sierra Nevada. The RVPRs are then used to correct the WSR-88D QPEs in the corresponding areas. The S-PROF–based VPR correction methodology (S-PROF-VPR) has taken into account orographic processes and radar beam broadenings with range. It is tested using three heavy rain events and is found to provide significant improvements over the operational radar QPE.

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Steven M. Martinaitis
,
Heather M. Grams
,
Carrie Langston
,
Jian Zhang
, and
Kenneth Howard

Abstract

Precipitation values estimated by radar are assumed to be the amount of precipitation that occurred at the surface, yet this notion is inaccurate. Numerous atmospheric and microphysical processes can alter the precipitation rate between the radar beam elevation and the surface. One such process is evaporation. This study determines the applicability of integrating an evaporation correction scheme for real-time radar-derived mosaicked precipitation rates to reduce quantitative precipitation estimate (QPE) overestimation and to reduce the coverage of false surface precipitation. An evaporation technique previously developed for large-scale numerical modeling is applied to Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS) precipitation rates through the use of 2D and 3D numerical weather prediction (NWP) atmospheric parameters as well as basic radar properties. Hourly accumulated QPE with evaporation adjustment compared against gauge observations saw an average reduction of the overestimation bias by 57%–76% for rain events and 42%–49% for primarily snow events. The removal of false surface precipitation also reduced the number of hourly gauge observations that were considered as “false zero” observations by 52.1% for rain and 38.2% for snow. Optimum computational efficiency was achieved through the use of simplified equations and hourly 10-km horizontal resolution NWP data. The run time for the evaporation correction algorithm is 6–7 s.

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Jian Zhang
,
Lin Tang
,
Stephen Cocks
,
Pengfei Zhang
,
Alexander Ryzhkov
,
Kenneth Howard
,
Carrie Langston
, and
Brian Kaney

Abstract

A new dual-polarization (DP) radar synthetic quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) product was developed using a combination of specific attenuation A, specific differential phase KDP, and reflectivity Z to calculate the precipitation rate R. Specific attenuation has advantages of being insensitive to systematic biases in Z and differential reflectivity ZDR due to partial beam blockage, attenuation, and calibration while more linearly related to R than other radar variables. However, the R(A) relationship is not applicable in areas containing ice. Therefore, the new DP QPE applies R(A) in areas where radar is observing pure rain, R(KDP) in regions potentially containing hail, and R(Z) elsewhere. Further, an evaporation correction was applied to minimize false light precipitation related to virga. The new DP QPE was evaluated in real time over the conterminous United States and showed significant improvements over previous radar QPE techniques that were based solely on R(Z) relationships. The improvements included reduced dry biases in heavy to extreme precipitation during the warm season. The new DP QPE also reduced errors and spatial discontinuities in regions impacted by partial beam blockage. Further, the new DP QPE reduced wet bias for scattered light precipitation in the southwest and north central United States where there is significant boundary layer evaporation.

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Steven M. Martinaitis
,
Andrew P. Osborne
,
Micheal J. Simpson
,
Jian Zhang
,
Kenneth W. Howard
,
Stephen B. Cocks
,
Ami Arthur
,
Carrie Langston
, and
Brian T. Kaney

Abstract

Weather radars and gauge observations are the primary observations to determine the coverage and magnitude of precipitation; however, radar and gauge networks have significant coverage gaps, which can underrepresent or even miss the occurrence of precipitation. This is especially noticeable in mountainous regions and in shallow precipitation regimes. The following study presents a methodology to improve spatial representations of precipitation by seamlessly blending multiple precipitation sources within the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor (MRMS) system. A high spatiotemporal resolution multisensor merged quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) product (MSQPE) is generated by using gauge-corrected radar QPE as a primary precipitation source with a combination of hourly gauge observations, monthly precipitation climatologies, numerical weather prediction short-term precipitation forecasts, and satellite observations to use in areas of insufficient radar coverage. The merging of the precipitation sources is dependent upon radar coverage based on an updated MRMS radar quality index, surface and atmospheric conditions, topography, gauge locations, and precipitation values. Evaluations of the MSQPE product over the western United States resulted in improved statistical measures over its individual input precipitation sources, particularly the locally gauge-corrected radar QPE. The MSQPE scheme demonstrated its ability to sufficiently fill in areas where radar alone failed to detect precipitation due to significant beam blockage or poor coverage while minimizing the generation of false precipitation and underestimation biases that resulted from radar overshooting precipitation.

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David Kitzmiller
,
Suzanne Van Cooten
,
Feng Ding
,
Kenneth Howard
,
Carrie Langston
,
Jian Zhang
,
Heather Moser
,
Yu Zhang
,
Jonathan J. Gourley
,
Dongsoo Kim
, and
David Riley

Abstract

This study investigates evolving methodologies for radar and merged gauge–radar quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) to determine their influence on the flow predictions of a distributed hydrologic model. These methods include the National Mosaic and QPE algorithm package (NMQ), under development at the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), and the Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) and High-Resolution Precipitation Estimator (HPE) suites currently operational at National Weather Service (NWS) field offices. The goal of the study is to determine which combination of algorithm features offers the greatest benefit toward operational hydrologic forecasting. These features include automated radar quality control, automated ZR selection, brightband identification, bias correction, multiple radar data compositing, and gauge–radar merging, which all differ between NMQ and MPE–HPE. To examine the spatial and temporal characteristics of the precipitation fields produced by each of the QPE methodologies, high-resolution (4 km and hourly) gridded precipitation estimates were derived by each algorithm suite for three major precipitation events between 2003 and 2006 over subcatchments within the Tar–Pamlico River basin of North Carolina. The results indicate that the NMQ radar-only algorithm suite consistently yielded closer agreement with reference rain gauge reports than the corresponding HPE radar-only estimates did. Similarly, the NMQ radar-only QPE input generally yielded hydrologic simulations that were closer to observations at multiple stream gauging points. These findings indicate that the combination of ZR selection and freezing-level identification algorithms within NMQ, but not incorporated within MPE and HPE, would have an appreciable positive impact on hydrologic simulations. There were relatively small differences between NMQ and HPE gauge–radar estimates in terms of accuracy and impacts on hydrologic simulations, most likely due to the large influence of the input rain gauge information.

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