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  • Author or Editor: D. C. Thornton x
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D. H. Lenschow
,
I. R. Paluch
,
A. R. Bandy
,
R. Pearson Jr.
,
S. R. Kawa
,
C. J. Weaver
,
B. J. Huebert
,
J. G. Kay
,
D. C. Thornton
, and
A. R. Driedger III

A combined atmospheric chemistry-meteorology experiment, the Dynamics and Chemistry of the Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS), was carried out during the summer of 1985 over the eastern Pacific Ocean using the NCAR Electra aircraft. The objectives were to 1) study the budgets of several trace reactive species in a relatively pristine, steady-state, horizontally homogeneous, well-mixed boundary layer capped by a strong inversion and 2) study the formation, maintenance and dissipation of marine stratocumulus that persists off the California coast (as well as similar regions elsewhere) in summer. We obtained both mean and turbulence measurements of meteorological variables within and above the cloud-capped boundary layer that is typical of this region. Ozone was used successfully as a tracer for estimating entrainment rate. We found, however, that horizontal variability was large enough for ozone that a correction needs to be included in the ozone budget for the horizontal displacement due to turns even though the airplane was allowed to drift with the wind. The time rate-of-change term was significant in both the ozone and radon budgets; as a result, a considerably longer time interval than the two hours used between sets of flight legs would be desirable to improve the measurement accuracy of this term.

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Bjorn Stevens
,
Donald H. Lenschow
,
Gabor Vali
,
Hermann Gerber
,
A. Bandy
,
B. Blomquist
,
J. -L. Brenguier
,
C. S. Bretherton
,
F. Burnet
,
T. Campos
,
S. Chai
,
I. Faloona
,
D. Friesen
,
S. Haimov
,
K. Laursen
,
D. K. Lilly
,
S. M. Loehrer
,
Szymon P. Malinowski
,
B. Morley
,
M. D. Petters
,
D. C. Rogers
,
L. Russell
,
V. Savic-Jovcic
,
J. R. Snider
,
D. Straub
,
Marcin J. Szumowski
,
H. Takagi
,
D. C. Thornton
,
M. Tschudi
,
C. Twohy
,
M. Wetzel
, and
M. C. van Zanten

The second Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS-II) field study is described. The field program consisted of nine flights in marine stratocumulus west-southwest of San Diego, California. The objective of the program was to better understand the physics a n d dynamics of marine stratocumulus. Toward this end special flight strategies, including predominantly nocturnal flights, were employed to optimize estimates of entrainment velocities at cloud-top, large-scale divergence within the boundary layer, drizzle processes in the cloud, cloud microstructure, and aerosol–cloud interactions. Cloud conditions during DYCOMS-II were excellent with almost every flight having uniformly overcast clouds topping a well-mixed boundary layer. Although the emphasis of the manuscript is on the goals and methodologies of DYCOMS-II, some preliminary findings are also presented—the most significant being that the cloud layers appear to entrain less and drizzle more than previous theoretical work led investigators to expect.

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H. C. Bloomfield
,
P. L. M. Gonzalez
,
J. K. Lundquist
,
L. P. Stoop
,
J. Browell
,
R. Dargaville
,
M. De Felice
,
K. Gruber
,
A. Hilbers
,
A. Kies
,
M. Panteli
,
H. E. Thornton
,
J. Wohland
,
M. Zeyringer
, and
D. J. Brayshaw
Open access
S. I. Bohnenstengel
,
S. E. Belcher
,
A. Aiken
,
J. D. Allan
,
G. Allen
,
A. Bacak
,
T. J. Bannan
,
J. F. Barlow
,
D. C. S. Beddows
,
W. J. Bloss
,
A. M. Booth
,
C. Chemel
,
O. Coceal
,
C. F. Di Marco
,
M. K. Dubey
,
K. H. Faloon
,
Z. L. Fleming
,
M. Furger
,
J. K. Gietl
,
R. R. Graves
,
D. C. Green
,
C. S. B. Grimmond
,
C. H. Halios
,
J. F. Hamilton
,
R. M. Harrison
,
M. R. Heal
,
D. E. Heard
,
C. Helfter
,
S. C. Herndon
,
R. E. Holmes
,
J. R. Hopkins
,
A. M. Jones
,
F. J. Kelly
,
S. Kotthaus
,
B. Langford
,
J. D. Lee
,
R. J. Leigh
,
A. C. Lewis
,
R. T. Lidster
,
F. D. Lopez-Hilfiker
,
J. B. McQuaid
,
C. Mohr
,
P. S. Monks
,
E. Nemitz
,
N. L. Ng
,
C. J. Percival
,
A. S. H. Prévôt
,
H. M. A. Ricketts
,
R. Sokhi
,
D. Stone
,
J. A. Thornton
,
A. H. Tremper
,
A. C. Valach
,
S. Visser
,
L. K. Whalley
,
L. R. Williams
,
L. Xu
,
D. E. Young
, and
P. Zotter

Abstract

Air quality and heat are strong health drivers, and their accurate assessment and forecast are important in densely populated urban areas. However, the sources and processes leading to high concentrations of main pollutants, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and fine and coarse particulate matter, in complex urban areas are not fully understood, limiting our ability to forecast air quality accurately. This paper introduces the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo; www.clearflo.ac.uk) project’s interdisciplinary approach to investigate the processes leading to poor air quality and elevated temperatures.

Within ClearfLo, a large multi-institutional project funded by the U.K. Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), integrated measurements of meteorology and gaseous, and particulate composition/loading within the atmosphere of London, United Kingdom, were undertaken to understand the processes underlying poor air quality. Long-term measurement infrastructure installed at multiple levels (street and elevated), and at urban background, curbside, and rural locations were complemented with high-resolution numerical atmospheric simulations. Combining these (measurement–modeling) enhances understanding of seasonal variations in meteorology and composition together with the controlling processes. Two intensive observation periods (winter 2012 and the Summer Olympics of 2012) focus upon the vertical structure and evolution of the urban boundary layer; chemical controls on nitrogen dioxide and ozone production—in particular, the role of volatile organic compounds; and processes controlling the evolution, size, distribution, and composition of particulate matter. The paper shows that mixing heights are deeper over London than in the rural surroundings and that the seasonality of the urban boundary layer evolution controls when concentrations peak. The composition also reflects the seasonality of sources such as domestic burning and biogenic emissions.

Full access
Robert M. Rauber
,
Bjorn Stevens
,
Harry T. Ochs III
,
Charles Knight
,
B. A. Albrecht
,
A. M. Blyth
,
C. W. Fairall
,
J. B. Jensen
,
S. G. Lasher-Trapp
,
O. L. Mayol-Bracero
,
G. Vali
,
J. R. Anderson
,
B. A. Baker
,
A. R. Bandy
,
E. Burnet
,
J.-L. Brenguier
,
W. A. Brewer
,
P. R. A. Brown
,
R Chuang
,
W. R. Cotton
,
L. Di Girolamo
,
B. Geerts
,
H. Gerber
,
S. Göke
,
L. Gomes
,
B. G. Heikes
,
J. G. Hudson
,
P. Kollias
,
R. R Lawson
,
S. K. Krueger
,
D. H. Lenschow
,
L. Nuijens
,
D. W. O'Sullivan
,
R. A. Rilling
,
D. C. Rogers
,
A. P. Siebesma
,
E. Snodgrass
,
J. L. Stith
,
D. C. Thornton
,
S. Tucker
,
C. H. Twohy
, and
P. Zuidema

Shallow, maritime cumuli are ubiquitous over much of the tropical oceans, and characterizing their properties is important to understanding weather and climate. The Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field campaign, which took place during November 2004–January 2005 in the trades over the western Atlantic, emphasized measurements of processes related to the formation of rain in shallow cumuli, and how rain subsequently modifies the structure and ensemble statistics of trade wind clouds. Eight weeks of nearly continuous S-band polarimetric radar sampling, 57 flights from three heavily instrumented research aircraft, and a suite of ground- and ship-based instrumentation provided data on trade wind clouds with unprecedented resolution. Observational strategies employed during RICO capitalized on the advances in remote sensing and other instrumentation to provide insight into processes that span a range of scales and that lie at the heart of questions relating to the cause and effects of rain from shallow maritime cumuli.

Full access
Robert M. Rauber
,
Harry T. Ochs III
,
L. Di Girolamo
,
S. Göke
,
E. Snodgrass
,
Bjorn Stevens
,
Charles Knight
,
J. B. Jensen
,
D. H. Lenschow
,
R. A. Rilling
,
D. C. Rogers
,
J. L. Stith
,
B. A. Albrecht
,
P. Zuidema
,
A. M. Blyth
,
C. W. Fairall
,
W. A. Brewer
,
S. Tucker
,
S. G. Lasher-Trapp
,
O. L. Mayol-Bracero
,
G. Vali
,
B. Geerts
,
J. R. Anderson
,
B. A. Baker
,
R. P. Lawson
,
A. R. Bandy
,
D. C. Thornton
,
E. Burnet
,
J-L. Brenguier
,
L. Gomes
,
P. R. A. Brown
,
P. Chuang
,
W. R. Cotton
,
H. Gerber
,
B. G. Heikes
,
J. G. Hudson
,
P. Kollias
,
S. K. Krueger
,
L. Nuijens
,
D. W. O'Sullivan
,
A. P. Siebesma
, and
C. H. Twohy
Full access