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  • Author or Editor: D. R. Marsh x
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R. E. Stewart
,
H. G. Leighton
,
P. Marsh
,
G. W. K. Moore
,
H. Ritchie
,
W. R. Rouse
,
E. D. Soulis
,
G. S. Strong
,
R. W. Crawford
, and
B. Kochtubajda

The Mackenzie River is the largest North American source of freshwater for the Arctic Ocean. This basin is subjected to wide fluctuations in its climate and it is currently experiencing a pronounced warming trend. As a major Canadian contribution to the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), the Mackenzie GEWEX Study (MAGS) is focusing on understanding and modeling the fluxes and reservoirs governing the flow of water and energy into and through the climate system of the Mackenzie River Basin. MAGS necessarily involves research into many atmospheric, land surface, and hydrological issues associated with cold climate systems. The overall objectives and scope of MAGS will be presented in this article.

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D. J. McNaughton
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N. E. Bowne
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R. L. Dennis
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R. R. Draxler
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S. R. Hanna
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T. Palma
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S. L. Marsh
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W. T. Pennell
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R. L. Peterson
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J. V. Ramsdell
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S. T. Rao
, and
R. J. Yamartino

The Eighth Joint Conference on Applications of Air Pollution Meteorology with the Air and Waste Management Association was held in conjunction with the AMS 74th Annual Meeting in Nashville, Tennessee, on 23–28 January 1994. Sessions at the meeting covered a broad range of topics including the dispersion environment, meteorology in emissions determination, long-range and mesoscale pollutant transport and fate, meteorology and photochemistry, advanced dispersion models and modeling systems, model evaluation, complex flows affecting dispersion near structures, and coastal and complex terrain issues. Papers followed some recurrent themes but many reported applications of new technology that provide new opportunities to see atmospheric characteristics and complexities for the first time. Innovative techniques were described in data analysis and presentation and modeling.

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James W. Hurrell
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M. M. Holland
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P. R. Gent
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S. Ghan
,
Jennifer E. Kay
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P. J. Kushner
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J.-F. Lamarque
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W. G. Large
,
D. Lawrence
,
K. Lindsay
,
W. H. Lipscomb
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M. C. Long
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N. Mahowald
,
D. R. Marsh
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R. B. Neale
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P. Rasch
,
S. Vavrus
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M. Vertenstein
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D. Bader
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W. D. Collins
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J. J. Hack
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J. Kiehl
, and
S. Marshall

The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a flexible and extensible community tool used to investigate a diverse set of Earth system interactions across multiple time and space scales. This global coupled model significantly extends its predecessor, the Community Climate System Model, by incorporating new Earth system simulation capabilities. These comprise the ability to simulate biogeochemical cycles, including those of carbon and nitrogen, a variety of atmospheric chemistry options, the Greenland Ice Sheet, and an atmosphere that extends to the lower thermosphere. These and other new model capabilities are enabling investigations into a wide range of pressing scientific questions, providing new foresight into possible future climates and increasing our collective knowledge about the behavior and interactions of the Earth system. Simulations with numerous configurations of the CESM have been provided to phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and are being analyzed by the broad community of scientists. Additionally, the model source code and associated documentation are freely available to the scientific community to use for Earth system studies, making it a true community tool. This article describes this Earth system model and its various possible configurations, and highlights a number of its scientific capabilities.

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Energy and Water Cycles in a High-Latitude, North-Flowing River System

Summary of Results from the Mackenzie GEWEX Study—Phase I

W. R. Rouse
,
E. M. Blyth
,
R. W. Crawford
,
J. R. Gyakum
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J. R. Janowicz
,
B. Kochtubajda
,
H. G. Leighton
,
P. Marsh
,
L. Martz
,
A. Pietroniro
,
H. Ritchie
,
W. M. Schertzer
,
E. D. Soulis
,
R. E. Stewart
,
G. S. Strong
, and
M. K. Woo

The MacKenzie Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Study, Phase 1, seeks to improve understanding of energy and water cycling in the Mackenzie River basin (MRB) and to initiate and test atmospheric, hydrologic, and coupled models that will project the sensitivity of these cycles to climate change and to human activities. Major findings from the study are outlined in this paper. Absorbed solar radiation is a primary driving force of energy and water, and shows dramatic temporal and spatial variability. Cloud amounts feature large diurnal, seasonal, and interannual fluctuations. Seasonality in moisture inputs and outputs is pronounced. Winter in the northern MRB features deep thermal inversions. Snow hydrological processes are very significant in this high-latitude environment and are being successfully modeled for various landscapes. Runoff processes are distinctive in the major terrain units, which is important to overall water cycling. Lakes and wetlands compose much of MRB and are prominent as hydrologic storage systems that must be incorporated into models. Additionally, they are very efficient and variable evaporating systems that are highly sensitive to climate variability. Mountainous high-latitude sub-basins comprise a mosaic of land surfaces with distinct hydrological attributes that act as variable source areas for runoff generation. They also promote leeward cyclonic storm generation. The hard rock terrain of the Canadian Shield exhibits a distinctive energy flux regimen and hydrologic regime. The MRB has been warming dramatically recently, and ice breakup and spring outflow into the Polar Sea has been occurring progressively earlier. This paper presents initial results from coupled atmospheric-hydrologic modeling and delineates distinctive cold region inputs needed for developments in regional and global climate modeling.

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John S. Kain
,
Michael C. Coniglio
,
James Correia
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Adam J. Clark
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Patrick T. Marsh
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Conrad L. Ziegler
,
Valliappa Lakshmanan
,
Stuart D. Miller Jr.
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Scott R. Dembek
,
Steven J. Weiss
,
Fanyou Kong
,
Ming Xue
,
Ryan A. Sobash
,
Andrew R. Dean
,
Israel L. Jirak
, and
Christopher J. Melick

The 2011 Spring Forecasting Experiment in the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT) featured a significant component on convection initiation (CI). As in previous HWT experiments, the CI study was a collaborative effort between forecasters and researchers, with equal emphasis on experimental forecasting strategies and evaluation of prototype model guidance products. The overarching goal of the CI effort was to identify the primary challenges of the CI forecasting problem and to establish a framework for additional studies and possible routine forecasting of CI. This study confirms that convection-allowing models with grid spacing ~4 km represent many aspects of the formation and development of deep convection clouds explicitly and with predictive utility. Further, it shows that automated algorithms can skillfully identify the CI process during model integration. However, it also reveals that automated detection of individual convection cells, by itself, provides inadequate guidance for the disruptive potential of deep convection activity. Thus, future work on the CI forecasting problem should be couched in terms of convection-event prediction rather than detection and prediction of individual convection cells.

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Gabriele G. Pfister
,
Sebastian D. Eastham
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Avelino F. Arellano
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Bernard Aumont
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Kelley C. Barsanti
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Mary C. Barth
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Andrew Conley
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Nicholas A. Davis
,
Louisa K. Emmons
,
Jerome D. Fast
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Arlene M. Fiore
,
Benjamin Gaubert
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Steve Goldhaber
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Claire Granier
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Georg A. Grell
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Marc Guevara
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Daven K. Henze
,
Alma Hodzic
,
Xiaohong Liu
,
Daniel R. Marsh
,
John J. Orlando
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John M. C. Plane
,
Lorenzo M. Polvani
,
Karen H. Rosenlof
,
Allison L. Steiner
,
Daniel J. Jacob
, and
Guy P. Brasseur

ABSTRACT

To explore the various couplings across space and time and between ecosystems in a consistent manner, atmospheric modeling is moving away from the fractured limited-scale modeling strategy of the past toward a unification of the range of scales inherent in the Earth system. This paper describes the forward-looking Multi-Scale Infrastructure for Chemistry and Aerosols (MUSICA), which is intended to become the next-generation community infrastructure for research involving atmospheric chemistry and aerosols. MUSICA will be developed collaboratively by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and university and government researchers, with the goal of serving the international research and applications communities. The capability of unifying various spatiotemporal scales, coupling to other Earth system components, and process-level modularization will allow advances in both fundamental and applied research in atmospheric composition, air quality, and climate and is also envisioned to become a platform that addresses the needs of policy makers and stakeholders.

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Adam J. Clark
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Israel L. Jirak
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Burkely T. Gallo
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Kent H. Knopfmeier
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Brett Roberts
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Makenzie Krocak
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Jake Vancil
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Kimberly A. Hoogewind
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Nathan A. Dahl
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Eric D. Loken
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David Jahn
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David Harrison
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David Imy
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Patrick Burke
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Louis J. Wicker
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Patrick S. Skinner
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Pamela L. Heinselman
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Patrick Marsh
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Katie A. Wilson
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Andrew R. Dean
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Gerald J. Creager
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Thomas A. Jones
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Jidong Gao
,
Yunheng Wang
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Montgomery Flora
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Corey K. Potvin
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Christopher A. Kerr
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Nusrat Yussouf
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Joshua Martin
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Jorge Guerra
,
Brian C. Matilla
, and
Thomas J. Galarneau
Full access
J. K. Andersen
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Liss M. Andreassen
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Emily H. Baker
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Thomas J. Ballinger
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Logan T. Berner
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Germar H. Bernhard
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Uma S. Bhatt
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Jarle W. Bjerke
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Jason E. Box
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L. Britt
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R. Brown
,
David Burgess
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John Cappelen
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Hanne H. Christiansen
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B. Decharme
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C. Derksen
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D. S. Drozdov
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Howard E. Epstein
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L. M. Farquharson
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Sinead L. Farrell
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Robert S. Fausto
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Xavier Fettweis
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Vitali E. Fioletov
,
Bruce C. Forbes
,
Gerald V. Frost
,
Sebastian Gerland
,
Scott J. Goetz
,
Jens-Uwe Grooß
,
Edward Hanna
,
Inger Hanssen-Bauer
,
Stefan Hendricks
,
Iolanda Ialongo
,
K. Isaksen
,
Bjørn Johnsen
,
L. Kaleschke
,
A. L. Kholodov
,
Seong-Joong Kim
,
Jack Kohler
,
Zachary Labe
,
Carol Ladd
,
Kaisa Lakkala
,
Mark J. Lara
,
Bryant Loomis
,
Bartłomiej Luks
,
K. Luojus
,
Matthew J. Macander
,
G. V. Malkova
,
Kenneth D. Mankoff
,
Gloria L. Manney
,
J. M. Marsh
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Walt Meier
,
Twila A. Moon
,
Thomas Mote
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L. Mudryk
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F. J. Mueter
,
Rolf Müller
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K. E. Nyland
,
Shad O’Neel
,
James E. Overland
,
Don Perovich
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Gareth K. Phoenix
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Martha K. Raynolds
,
C. H. Reijmer
,
Robert Ricker
,
Vladimir E. Romanovsky
,
E. A. G. Schuur
,
Martin Sharp
,
Nikolai I. Shiklomanov
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C. J. P. P. Smeets
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Sharon L. Smith
,
Dimitri A. Streletskiy
,
Marco Tedesco
,
Richard L. Thoman
,
J. T. Thorson
,
X. Tian-Kunze
,
Mary-Louise Timmermans
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Hans Tømmervik
,
Mark Tschudi
,
Dirk van As
,
R. S. W. van de Wal
,
Donald A. Walker
,
John E. Walsh
,
Muyin Wang
,
Melinda Webster
,
Øyvind Winton
,
Gabriel J. Wolken
,
K. Wood
,
Bert Wouters
, and
S. Zador
Free access