Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Dev Niyogi x
  • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Soyoung Choi
,
Dev Niyogi
,
Daniel P. Shepardson
, and
Umarporn Charusombat

Misconceptions or a lack of relevant prior concepts can hinder students from developing an understanding of scientific concepts. Science education research suggests that building on students' prior concepts is an effective way to develop students' scientific knowledge. This study reports the results of an analysis of earth and environmental science textbooks' representations of climate change concepts and an examination of these presentations for possible contribution to students' common misconceptions of climate change. A literature review was conducted to identify students' common misconceptions of climate change. Textbooks' conceptual coverage and their ways of presenting scientific conceptions were examined concerning their potential influence on further reinforcing and adding greater confidence to students' misconceptions. Our results indicate that the reviewed textbooks were not designed based on careful consideration of students' common misconceptions of climate change. We made recommendations for improving the conceptual clarity and organization of climate change concepts in Earth and environmental science textbooks.

Full access
Margaret A. LeMone
,
Fei Chen
,
Joseph G. Alfieri
,
Richard H. Cuenca
,
Yutaka Hagimoto
,
Peter Blanken
,
Dev Niyogi
,
Songlak Kang
,
Kenneth Davis
, and
Robert L. Grossman

The May–June 2002 International H2O Project was held in the U.S. Southern Great Plains to determine ways that moisture data could be collected and utilized in numerical forecast models most effectively. We describe the surface and boundary layer components, and indicate how the data can be acquired. These data document the eddy transport of heat and water vapor from the surface to the atmosphere (in terms of sensible heat flux H and latent heat flux LE), as well as radiative, atmospheric, soil, and vegetative factors that affect it, so that the moisture and heat supply to the atmosphere can be related to surface properties both for observational studies and tests of land surface models. The surface dataset was collected at 10 surface flux towers at locations representing the major types of land cover and extending from southeast Kansas to the Oklahoma Panhandle. At each location, the components of the surface energy budget (H, LE, net radiation, and soil heat flux) are documented each half-hour, along with the weather (wind, temperature, mixing ratio, air pressure, and precipitation), soil temperature, moisture, and matric potential down to 70–90 cm beneath the surface at 9 of the 10 sites. Observations of soil and vegetation properties and their horizontal changes were taken near all 10 towers during periodic visits. Aircraft measurements of H and LE from repeated low-level flight tracks along three tracks collocated with the surface sites extend the flux tower measurements horizontally. We illustrate the effects of vegetation and soil moisture on the H and LE and their horizontal variability.

Full access
Walter Dabberdt
,
Darrel Baumgardner
,
Robert Bornstein
,
Gregory Carmichael
,
Richard Clark
,
Jeffrey Collett
,
Harindra Fernando
,
Efi Foufoula-Georgiou
,
Dev Niyogi
,
Mohan Ramamurthy
,
Alan Robock
, and
Julie Winkler
Open access
Roger Pielke Sr.
,
John Nielsen-Gammon
,
Christopher Davey
,
Jim Angel
,
Odie Bliss
,
Nolan Doesken
,
Ming Cai
,
Souleymane Fall
,
Dev Niyogi
,
Kevin Gallo
,
Robert Hale
,
Kenneth G. Hubbard
,
Xiaomao Lin
,
Hong Li
, and
Sethu Raman

The objective of this research is to determine whether poorly sited long-term surface temperature monitoring sites have been adjusted in order to provide spatially representative independent data for use in regional and global surface temperature analyses. We present detailed analyses that demonstrate the lack of independence of the poorly sited data when they are adjusted using the homogenization procedures employed in past studies, as well as discuss the uncertainties associated with undocumented station moves. We use simulation and mathematics to determine the effect of trend on station adjustments and the associated effect of trend in the reference series on the trend of the adjusted station. We also compare data before and after adjustment to the reanalysis data, and we discuss the effect of land use changes on the uncertainty of measurement.

A major conclusion of our analysis is that there are large uncertainties associated with the surface temperature trends from the poorly sited stations. Moreover, rather than providing additional independent information, the use of the data from poorly sited stations provides a false sense of confidence in the robustness of the surface temperature trend assessments.

Full access
Cenlin He
,
Fei Chen
,
Michael Barlage
,
Zong-Liang Yang
,
Jerry W. Wegiel
,
Guo-Yue Niu
,
David Gochis
,
David M. Mocko
,
Ronnie Abolafia-Rosenzweig
,
Zhe Zhang
,
Tzu-Shun Lin
,
Prasanth Valayamkunnath
,
Michael Ek
, and
Dev Niyogi
Open access
Rezaul Mahmood
,
Roger A. Pielke Sr.
,
Kenneth G. Hubbard
,
Dev Niyogi
,
Gordon Bonan
,
Peter Lawrence
,
Richard McNider
,
Clive McAlpine
,
Andres Etter
,
Samuel Gameda
,
Budong Qian
,
Andrew Carleton
,
Adriana Beltran-Przekurat
,
Thomas Chase
,
Arturo I. Quintanar
,
Jimmy O. Adegoke
,
Sajith Vezhapparambu
,
Glen Conner
,
Salvi Asefi
,
Elif Sertel
,
David R. Legates
,
Yuling Wu
,
Robert Hale
,
Oliver W. Frauenfeld
,
Anthony Watts
,
Marshall Shepherd
,
Chandana Mitra
,
Valentine G. Anantharaj
,
Souleymane Fall
,
Robert Lund
,
Anna Treviño
,
Peter Blanken
,
Jinyang Du
,
Hsin-I Chang
,
Ronnie Leeper
,
Udaysankar S. Nair
,
Scott Dobler
,
Ravinesh Deo
, and
Jozef Syktus
Full access
Akshara Kaginalkar
,
Sachin D. Ghude
,
U. C. Mohanty
,
Pradeep Mujumdar
,
Sudheer Bhakare
,
Hemant Darbari
,
Arun K. Dwivedi
,
Pallavi Gavali
,
Srujan Gavhale
,
Sahidul Islam
,
Gouri Kadam
,
Sumita Kedia
,
Manoj Khare
,
Neelesh Kharkar
,
Santosh H. Kulkarni
,
Sri Sai Meher
,
A. K. Nath
,
Mohamed Niyaz
,
Sagar Pokale
,
Vineeth Krishnan Valappil
,
Sreyashi Debnath
,
Chinmay Jena
,
Raghu Nadimpalli
,
Madhusmita Swain
,
Saimy Davis
,
Shubha Avinash
,
C. Kishtawal
,
Prashant Gargava
,
S. D. Attri
, and
Dev Niyogi

Abstract

Global urban population is projected to double by 2050. This rapid urbanization is the driver of economic growth but has environmental challenges. To that end, there is an urgent need to understand, simulate, and disseminate information about extreme events, routine city operations, and long-term planning decisions. This paper describes an effort underway in India involving an interdisciplinary community of meteorology, hydrology, air quality, and computer science from national and international institutes. The urban collaboratory is a system of systems for simulating weather, hydrology, air quality, health, energy, transport, and economy and its interactions. Study and prediction of urban events involve multiscale observations and cross-sector models, heterogeneous data management, and enormous computing power. The consortia program (NSM_Urban) is part of “weather ready cities,” under the aegis of India’s National Supercomputing Mission. The ecosystem “Urban Environment Science to Society” (UES2S) builds on the integrated cyberinfrastructure with a science gateway for community research and end-user service with modeling and interoperable data. The collaboratory has urban computing, stakeholder participation, and a coordinated means to scaffold projects and ideas into operational tools. It discusses the design and the utilization of high-performance computing (HPC) as a science cloud platform for bridging urban environment and data science, participatory stakeholder applications, and decision-making. The system currently integrates models for high-impact urban weather, flooding, air quality, and simulating street- and building-scale wind flow and dispersion. The program with the work underway is ripe for interfacing with regional and international partners, and this paper provides an avenue toward that end.

Full access