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  • Author or Editor: Edwin Eloranta x
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Roland B. Stull
and
Edwin W. Eloranta

Interactions between fair-weather cumulus clouds and mixed-layer thermals were the focus of a one-month field experiment in Oklahoma. This experiment, called Boundary Layer Experiment—1983 (BLX83), combined remote sensors, surface observations, balloon platforms, and aircraft measurements to study the kinematics at the top of the daytime convective boundary layer. Emphasis was placed on the study of the entrainment zone, and on the relationship between individual thermals as identified by lidar and turbulent motions and fluxes as measured by aircraft and sodar.

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A Focus On Mixed-Phase Clouds

The Status of Ground-Based Observational Methods

Matthew D. Shupe
,
John S. Daniel
,
Gijs de Boer
,
Edwin W. Eloranta
,
Pavlos Kollias
,
Charles N. Long
,
Edward P. Luke
,
David D. Turner
, and
Johannes Verlinde

The phase composition and microphysical structure of clouds define the manner in which they modulate atmospheric radiation and contribute to the hydrologic cycle. Issues regarding cloud phase partitioning and transformation come to bear directly in mixed-phase clouds, and have been difficult to address within current modeling frameworks. Ground-based, remote-sensing observations of mixed-phase clouds can contribute a significant body of knowledge with which to better understand, and thereby more accurately model, clouds and their phase-defining processes. Utilizing example observations from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which occurred at the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Climate Research Facility in Barrow, Alaska, during autumn 2004, we review the current status of ground-based observation and retrieval methods used in characterizing the macrophysical, microphysical, radiative, and dynamical properties of stratiform mixed-phase clouds. In general, cloud phase, boundaries, ice properties, liquid water path, optical depth, and vertical velocity are available from a combination of active and passive sensors. Significant deficiencies exist in our ability to vertically characterize the liquid phase, to distinguish ice crystal habits, and to understand aerosol-cloud interactions. Further validation studies are needed to evaluate, improve, and expand our retrieval abilities in mixed-phase clouds.

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Dan Lubin
,
Damao Zhang
,
Israel Silber
,
Ryan C. Scott
,
Petros Kalogeras
,
Alessandro Battaglia
,
David H. Bromwich
,
Maria Cadeddu
,
Edwin Eloranta
,
Ann Fridlind
,
Amanda Frossard
,
Keith M. Hines
,
Stefan Kneifel
,
W. Richard Leaitch
,
Wuyin Lin
,
Julien Nicolas
,
Heath Powers
,
Patricia K. Quinn
,
Penny Rowe
,
Lynn M. Russell
,
Sangeeta Sharma
,
Johannes Verlinde
, and
Andrew M. Vogelmann

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) performed comprehensive meteorological and aerosol measurements and ground-based atmospheric remote sensing at two Antarctic stations using the most advanced instrumentation available. A suite of cloud research radars, lidars, spectral and broadband radiometers, aerosol chemical and microphysical sampling equipment, and meteorological instrumentation was deployed at McMurdo Station on Ross Island from December 2015 through December 2016. A smaller suite of radiometers and meteorological equipment, including radiosondes optimized for surface energy budget measurement, was deployed on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet between 4 December 2015 and 17 January 2016. AWARE provided Antarctic atmospheric data comparable to several well-instrumented high Arctic sites that have operated for many years and that reveal numerous contrasts with the Arctic in aerosol and cloud microphysical properties. These include persistent differences in liquid cloud occurrence, cloud height, and cloud thickness. Antarctic aerosol properties are also quite different from the Arctic in both seasonal cycle and composition, due to the continent’s isolation from lower latitudes by Southern Ocean storm tracks. Antarctic aerosol number and mass concentrations are not only non-negligible but perhaps play a more important role than previously recognized because of the higher sensitivities of clouds at the very low concentrations caused by the large-scale dynamical isolation. Antarctic aerosol chemical composition, particularly organic components, has implications for local cloud microphysics. The AWARE dataset, fully available online in the ARM Program data archive, offers numerous case studies for unique and rigorous evaluation of mixed-phase cloud parameterization in climate models.

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Dan Lubin
,
Damao Zhang
,
Israel Silber
,
Ryan C. Scott
,
Petros Kalogeras
,
Alessandro Battaglia
,
David H. Bromwich
,
Maria Cadeddu
,
Edwin Eloranta
,
Ann Fridlind
,
Amanda Frossard
,
Keith M. Hines
,
Stefan Kneifel
,
W. Richard Leaitch
,
Wuyin Lin
,
Julien Nicolas
,
Heath Powers
,
Patricia K. Quinn
,
Penny Rowe
,
Lynn M. Russell
,
Sangeeta Sharma
,
Johannes Verlinde
, and
Andrew M. Vogelmann
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David A. R. Kristovich
,
George S. Young
,
Johannes Verlinde
,
Peter J. Sousounis
,
Pierre Mourad
,
Donald Lenschow
,
Robert M. Rauber
,
Mohan K. Ramamurthy
,
Brian F. Jewett
,
Kenneth Beard
,
Elen Cutrim
,
Paul J. DeMott
,
Edwin W. Eloranta
,
Mark R. Hjelmfelt
,
Sonia M. Kreidenweis
,
Jon Martin
,
James Moore
,
Harry T. Ochs III
,
David C Rogers
,
John Scala
,
Gregory Tripoli
, and
John Young

A severe 5-day lake-effect storm resulted in eight deaths, hundreds of injuries, and over $3 million in damage to a small area of northeastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania in November 1996. In 1999, a blizzard associated with an intense cyclone disabled Chicago and much of the U.S. Midwest with 30–90 cm of snow. Such winter weather conditions have many impacts on the lives and property of people throughout much of North America. Each of these events is the culmination of a complex interaction between synoptic-scale, mesoscale, and microscale processes.

An understanding of how the multiple size scales and timescales interact is critical to improving forecasting of these severe winter weather events. The Lake-Induced Convection Experiment (Lake-ICE) and the Snowband Dynamics Project (SNOWBAND) collected comprehensive datasets on processes involved in lake-effect snowstorms and snowbands associated with cyclones during the winter of 1997/98. This paper outlines the goals and operations of these collaborative projects. Preliminary findings are given with illustrative examples of new state-of-the-art research observations collected. Analyses associated with Lake-ICE and SNOWBAND hold the promise of greatly improving our scientific understanding of processes involved in these important wintertime phenomena.

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Bruce Albrecht
,
Virendra Ghate
,
Johannes Mohrmann
,
Robert Wood
,
Paquita Zuidema
,
Christopher Bretherton
,
Christian Schwartz
,
Edwin Eloranta
,
Susanne Glienke
,
Shaunna Donaher
,
Mampi Sarkar
,
Jeremy McGibbon
,
Alison D. Nugent
,
Raymond A. Shaw
,
Jacob Fugal
,
Patrick Minnis
,
Robindra Paliknoda
,
Louis Lussier
,
Jorgen Jensen
,
J. Vivekanandan
,
Scott Ellis
,
Peisang Tsai
,
Robert Rilling
,
Julie Haggerty
,
Teresa Campos
,
Meghan Stell
,
Michael Reeves
,
Stuart Beaton
,
John Allison
,
Gregory Stossmeister
,
Samuel Hall
, and
Sebastian Schmidt

Abstract

The Cloud System Evolution in the Trades (CSET) study was designed to describe and explain the evolution of the boundary layer aerosol, cloud, and thermodynamic structures along trajectories within the North Pacific trade winds. The study centered on seven round trips of the National Science Foundation–National Center for Atmospheric Research (NSF–NCAR) Gulfstream V (GV) between Sacramento, California, and Kona, Hawaii, between 7 July and 9 August 2015. The CSET observing strategy was to sample aerosol, cloud, and boundary layer properties upwind from the transition zone over the North Pacific and to resample these areas two days later. Global Forecast System forecast trajectories were used to plan the outbound flight to Hawaii with updated forecast trajectories setting the return flight plan two days later. Two key elements of the CSET observing system were the newly developed High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Cloud Radar (HCR) and the high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL). Together they provided unprecedented characterizations of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation structures that were combined with in situ measurements of aerosol, cloud, precipitation, and turbulence properties. The cloud systems sampled included solid stratocumulus infused with smoke from Canadian wildfires, mesoscale cloud–precipitation complexes, and patches of shallow cumuli in very clean environments. Ultraclean layers observed frequently near the top of the boundary layer were often associated with shallow, optically thin, layered veil clouds. The extensive aerosol, cloud, drizzle, and boundary layer sampling made over open areas of the northeast Pacific along 2-day trajectories during CSET will be an invaluable resource for modeling studies of boundary layer cloud system evolution and its governing physical processes.

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