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  • Author or Editor: Fei Wu x
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Mengwen Wu
,
Yali Luo
,
Fei Chen
, and
Wai Kin Wong

Abstract

Understanding changes in subdaily rainfall extremes is critical to urban planners for building more sustainable and resilient cities. In this study, the hourly precipitation data in 1971–2016 from 61 rain gauges are combined with historical land-use change data to investigate changes in extreme hourly precipitation (EXHP) in the Pearl River delta (PRD) region of South China. Also, 120 extreme rainfall events (EXREs) during 2011–16 are analyzed using observations collected at densely distributed automatic weather stations and radar network. Statistically significant increase of hourly precipitation intensity leads to higher annual amounts of both total and extreme precipitation over the PRD urban cluster in the rapid urbanization period (about 1994–2016) than during the preurbanization era (1971 to about 1993), suggesting a possible link between the enhanced rainfall and the rapid urbanization. Those urbanization-related positive trends are closely related to more frequent occurrence of abrupt rainfall events with short duration (≤6 h) than the continuous or growing rainfall events with longer duration. The 120 EXREs in 2011–16 are categorized into six types according to the originating location and movement of the extreme-rain-producing storms. Despite the wide range of synoptic backgrounds and seasons, rainfall intensification by the strong urban heat island (UHI) effect is a clear signal in all the six types, especially over the inland urban cluster with prominent UHIs. The UHI thermal perturbation probably plays an important role in the convective initiation and intensification of the locally developed extreme-rain-producing storms during the daytime.

Open access
Lei Wang
,
Zhi-Jun Yao
,
Li-Guang Jiang
,
Rui Wang
,
Shan-Shan Wu
, and
Zhao-Fei Liu

Abstract

The spatiotemporal changes in 21 indices of extreme temperature and precipitation for the Mongolian Plateau from 1951 to 2012 were investigated on the basis of daily temperature and precipitation data from 70 meteorological stations. Changes in catastrophic events, such as droughts, floods, and snowstorms, were also investigated for the same period. The correlations between catastrophic events and the extreme indices were examined. The results show that the Mongolian Plateau experienced an asymmetric warming trend. Both the cold extremes and warm extremes showed greater warming at night than in the daytime. The spatial changes in significant trends showed a good homogeneity and consistency in Inner Mongolia. Changes in the precipitation extremes were not as obvious as those in the temperature extremes. The spatial distributions in changes of precipitation extremes were complex. A decreasing trend was shown for total precipitation from west to east as based on the spatial distribution of decadal trends. Drought was the most serious extreme disaster, and prolonged drought for longer than 3 yr occurred about every 7–11 yr. An increasing trend in the disaster area was apparent for flood events from 1951 to 2012. A decreasing trend was observed for the maximum depth of snowfall from 1951 to 2012, with a decreased average maximum depth of 10 mm from the 1990s.

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