Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Henry E. Fuelberg x
  • Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Henry E. Fuelberg
Full access
Henry E. Fuelberg
and
James E. Hoke
Full access
James T. Moore
and
Henry E. Fuelberg

Fields of divergence, vertical motion, stability, and surface pressure tendency are examined at 3 h intervals for the first regional scale AVE-SESAME '79 (Atmospheric Variability Experiment—Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment) day. Two areas of severe storms formed during the period from 1200 GMT 10 April through 1200 GMT 11 April. The Red River Valley outbreak began during the afternoon of 10 April, while a second area formed in southwestern Texas during the early evening hours. Results show the rapid changes in environmental conditions associated with these two storm areas.

The propagation of an upper level jet streak into the region was a major factor in producing the Red River Valley outbreak. This streak was associated with the formation of a strong low-level jet and a small-scale surface pressure perturbation. The sudden development of a strong upper tropospheric wind maximum over Oklahoma and Kansas corresponded with major changes in kinematic parameters at that level. Instability over the Red River Valley was released by strong upward motion producing intense convection.

Similar features were responsible for the storms in southwestern Texas. Although this area was quite unstable, forcing mechanisms appear somewhat weaker than in the earlier outbreak.

Full access
Henry E. Fuelberg
and
Matthew F. Printy

Meso β-scale rawinsonde data from the Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms and Mesoscale Experiment (AVE-SESAME) V period (20–21 May 1979) are used to diagnose atmospheric variability in the environment of a convective area. As the storms developed, temperatures increased in the upper stratosphere; however, cooling was observed nearer to the surface and in the lower stratosphere. Height rises above 400 mb produced a mesohigh over the convective area that was most pronounced near 200 mb. Weaker height falls occurred in the lower troposphere.

Wind patterns underwent especially interesting fluctuations. North of the convective area, upper-level winds increased significantly during storm development. Southeast of the convection, however, winds near 200 mb decreased approximately 50% during a 3 h period coinciding with the most active storms. On the other hand, winds at 400 mb almost doubled during the same 3 h period. Strong low-level convergence, upper-level divergence, and ascending motion developed after storm initiation.

Much more detailed study is required to understand this fascinating case. However, many of the current findings about the meso β-scale storm environment are consistent with those previously attributed to feedback mechanisms from severe thunderstorms.

Full access