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Yuan Yang
,
Ming Pan
,
Peirong Lin
,
Hylke E. Beck
,
Zhenzhong Zeng
,
Dai Yamazaki
,
Cédric H. David
,
Hui Lu
,
Kun Yang
,
Yang Hong
, and
Eric F. Wood

Abstract

Better understanding and quantification of river floods for very local and “flashy” events calls for modeling capability at fine spatial and temporal scales. However, long-term discharge records with a global coverage suitable for extreme events analysis are still lacking. Here, grounded on recent breakthroughs in global runoff hydrology, river modeling, high-resolution hydrography, and climate reanalysis, we developed a 3-hourly river discharge record globally for 2.94 million river reaches during the 40-yr period of 1980–2019. The underlying modeling chain consists of the VIC land surface model (0.05°, 3-hourly) that is well calibrated and bias corrected and the RAPID routing model (2.94 million river and catchment vectors), with precipitation input from MSWEP and other meteorological fields downscaled from ERA5. Flood events (above 2-yr return) and their characteristics (number, spatial distribution, and seasonality) were extracted and studied. Validations against 3-hourly flow records from 6,000+ gauges in CONUS and daily records from 14,000+ gauges globally show good modeling performance across all flow ranges, good skills in reconstructing flood events (high extremes), and the benefit of (and need for) subdaily modeling. This data record, referred as Global Reach-Level Flood Reanalysis (GRFR), is publicly available at https://www.reachhydro.org/home/records/grfr.

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Yihong Duan
,
Qilin Wan
,
Jian Huang
,
Kun Zhao
,
Hui Yu
,
Yuqing Wang
,
Dajun Zhao
,
Jianing Feng
,
Jie Tang
,
Peiyan Chen
,
Xiaoqin Lu
,
Yuan Wang
,
Jianyin Liang
,
Liguang Wu
,
Xiaopeng Cui
,
Jing Xu
, and
Pak-Wai Chan

Abstract

Landfalling tropical cyclones (TCs) often experience drastic changes in their motion, intensity, and structure due to complex multiscale interactions among atmospheric processes and among the coastal ocean, land, and atmosphere. Because of the lack of comprehensive data and low capability of numerical models, understanding of and ability to predict landfalling TCs are still limited. A 10-yr key research project on landfalling TCs was initiated and launched in 2009 in China. The project has been jointly supported by the China Ministry of Science and Technology, China Meteorological Administration (CMA), Ministry of Education, and Chinese Academy of Sciences. Its mission is to enhance understanding of landfalling TC processes and improve forecasting skills on track, intensity, and distributions of strong winds and precipitation in landfalling TCs. This article provides an overview of the project, together with highlights of some new findings and new technical developments, as well as planned future efforts.

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Suranjana Saha
,
Shrinivas Moorthi
,
Hua-Lu Pan
,
Xingren Wu
,
Jiande Wang
,
Sudhir Nadiga
,
Patrick Tripp
,
Robert Kistler
,
John Woollen
,
David Behringer
,
Haixia Liu
,
Diane Stokes
,
Robert Grumbine
,
George Gayno
,
Jun Wang
,
Yu-Tai Hou
,
Hui-ya Chuang
,
Hann-Ming H. Juang
,
Joe Sela
,
Mark Iredell
,
Russ Treadon
,
Daryl Kleist
,
Paul Van Delst
,
Dennis Keyser
,
John Derber
,
Michael Ek
,
Jesse Meng
,
Helin Wei
,
Rongqian Yang
,
Stephen Lord
,
Huug van den Dool
,
Arun Kumar
,
Wanqiu Wang
,
Craig Long
,
Muthuvel Chelliah
,
Yan Xue
,
Boyin Huang
,
Jae-Kyung Schemm
,
Wesley Ebisuzaki
,
Roger Lin
,
Pingping Xie
,
Mingyue Chen
,
Shuntai Zhou
,
Wayne Higgins
,
Cheng-Zhi Zou
,
Quanhua Liu
,
Yong Chen
,
Yong Han
,
Lidia Cucurull
,
Richard W. Reynolds
,
Glenn Rutledge
, and
Mitch Goldberg

The NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) was completed for the 31-yr period from 1979 to 2009, in January 2010. The CFSR was designed and executed as a global, high-resolution coupled atmosphere–ocean–land surface–sea ice system to provide the best estimate of the state of these coupled domains over this period. The current CFSR will be extended as an operational, real-time product into the future. New features of the CFSR include 1) coupling of the atmosphere and ocean during the generation of the 6-h guess field, 2) an interactive sea ice model, and 3) assimilation of satellite radiances by the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) scheme over the entire period. The CFSR global atmosphere resolution is ~38 km (T382) with 64 levels extending from the surface to 0.26 hPa. The global ocean's latitudinal spacing is 0.25° at the equator, extending to a global 0.5° beyond the tropics, with 40 levels to a depth of 4737 m. The global land surface model has four soil levels and the global sea ice model has three layers. The CFSR atmospheric model has observed variations in carbon dioxide (CO2) over the 1979–2009 period, together with changes in aerosols and other trace gases and solar variations. Most available in situ and satellite observations were included in the CFSR. Satellite observations were used in radiance form, rather than retrieved values, and were bias corrected with “spin up” runs at full resolution, taking into account variable CO2 concentrations. This procedure enabled the smooth transitions of the climate record resulting from evolutionary changes in the satellite observing system.

CFSR atmospheric, oceanic, and land surface output products are available at an hourly time resolution and a horizontal resolution of 0.5° latitude × 0.5° longitude. The CFSR data will be distributed by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) and NCAR. This reanalysis will serve many purposes, including providing the basis for most of the NCEP Climate Prediction Center's operational climate products by defining the mean states of the atmosphere, ocean, land surface, and sea ice over the next 30-yr climate normal (1981–2010); providing initial conditions for historical forecasts that are required to calibrate operational NCEP climate forecasts (from week 2 to 9 months); and providing estimates and diagnoses of the Earth's climate state over the satellite data period for community climate research.

Preliminary analysis of the CFSR output indicates a product that is far superior in most respects to the reanalysis of the mid-1990s. The previous NCEP–NCAR reanalyses have been among the most used NCEP products in history; there is every reason to believe the CFSR will supersede these older products both in scope and quality, because it is higher in time and space resolution, covers the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, and land, and was executed in a coupled mode with a more modern data assimilation system and forecast model.

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