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  • Author or Editor: J. Hudson x
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T. S. Hudson
,
A. Horseman
, and
J. Sugier

Abstract

The virtual ionosphere reflection height variation is investigated temporally and spatially, with specific reference to the Met Office’s lightning detection network, the Arrival Time Difference Network (ATDnet). Data from this network, operating at 13.7 kHz, and a propagation model built by the Met Office based upon published theory were used to investigate this variation, specifically with regard to diurnal, seasonal, and 11-yr solar cycle variation. Variation over these temporal scales is chosen, since they correspond with variation in solar irradiance upon the earth’s atmosphere, something known to drive ionosphere height variation. The virtual ionosphere reflection height is found to vary diurnally from ~65 km for the period 1000–1600 UTC to ~80 km for the period 2200–0400 UTC, from 1 June to 31 August 2013 inclusive. A similar magnitude of variation is also observed seasonally, with the ionosphere height for daytime in August 2013 being ~64 km and for December 2013 being ~76 km. No significant variation is observed between the minimum and maximum of the last solar cycle, with a difference in ionosphere height of ~1 km at most. The potential impacts of these results upon a very low-frequency (VLF) lightning detection network such as ATDnet are discussed, with solutions such as subnetting and wave-mode dominance analysis examined.

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C. Holstein-Rathlou
,
J. Merrison
,
J. J. Iversen
,
A. B. Jakobsen
,
R. Nicolajsen
,
P. Nørnberg
,
K. Rasmussen
,
A. Merlone
,
G. Lopardo
,
T. Hudson
,
D. Banfield
, and
G. Portyankina

Abstract

Reliable and accurate environmental sensing is a cornerstone of modern meteorology. This paper presents a laboratory environmental simulator capable of reproducing extreme environments and performing tests and calibrations of meteorological sensor systems under controlled conditions. This facility is available to the research community as well as industry and is intended to encourage advancement in the field of sensor metrology applied to meteorology and climatology. Discussion will be made of the temperature, pressure, humidity and wind flow control, and sensing systems with reference to specific sensor test programs and future research activities.

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