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  • Author or Editor: J. W. Barrett x
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David C. Leon
,
Jeffrey R. French
,
Sonia Lasher-Trapp
,
Alan M. Blyth
,
Steven J. Abel
,
Susan Ballard
,
Andrew Barrett
,
Lindsay J. Bennett
,
Keith Bower
,
Barbara Brooks
,
Phil Brown
,
Cristina Charlton-Perez
,
Thomas Choularton
,
Peter Clark
,
Chris Collier
,
Jonathan Crosier
,
Zhiqiang Cui
,
Seonaid Dey
,
David Dufton
,
Chloe Eagle
,
Michael J. Flynn
,
Martin Gallagher
,
Carol Halliwell
,
Kirsty Hanley
,
Lee Hawkness-Smith
,
Yahui Huang
,
Graeme Kelly
,
Malcolm Kitchen
,
Alexei Korolev
,
Humphrey Lean
,
Zixia Liu
,
John Marsham
,
Daniel Moser
,
John Nicol
,
Emily G. Norton
,
David Plummer
,
Jeremy Price
,
Hugo Ricketts
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Nigel Roberts
,
Phil D. Rosenberg
,
David Simonin
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Jonathan W. Taylor
,
Robert Warren
,
Paul I. Williams
, and
Gillian Young

Abstract

The Convective Precipitation Experiment (COPE) was a joint U.K.–U.S. field campaign held during the summer of 2013 in the southwest peninsula of England, designed to study convective clouds that produce heavy rain leading to flash floods. The clouds form along convergence lines that develop regularly as a result of the topography. Major flash floods have occurred in the past, most famously at Boscastle in 2004. It has been suggested that much of the rain was produced by warm rain processes, similar to some flash floods that have occurred in the United States. The overarching goal of COPE is to improve quantitative convective precipitation forecasting by understanding the interactions of the cloud microphysics and dynamics and thereby to improve numerical weather prediction (NWP) model skill for forecasts of flash floods. Two research aircraft, the University of Wyoming King Air and the U.K. BAe 146, obtained detailed in situ and remote sensing measurements in, around, and below storms on several days. A new fast-scanning X-band dual-polarization Doppler radar made 360° volume scans over 10 elevation angles approximately every 5 min and was augmented by two Met Office C-band radars and the Chilbolton S-band radar. Detailed aerosol measurements were made on the aircraft and on the ground. This paper i) provides an overview of the COPE field campaign and the resulting dataset, ii) presents examples of heavy convective rainfall in clouds containing ice and also in relatively shallow clouds through the warm rain process alone, and iii) explains how COPE data will be used to improve high-resolution NWP models for operational use.

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James D. Doyle
,
Jonathan R. Moskaitis
,
Joel W. Feldmeier
,
Ronald J. Ferek
,
Mark Beaubien
,
Michael M. Bell
,
Daniel L. Cecil
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Robert L. Creasey
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Patrick Duran
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Russell L. Elsberry
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William A. Komaromi
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John Molinari
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David R. Ryglicki
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Daniel P. Stern
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Christopher S. Velden
,
Xuguang Wang
,
Todd Allen
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Bradford S. Barrett
,
Peter G. Black
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Jason P. Dunion
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Kerry A. Emanuel
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Patrick A. Harr
,
Lee Harrison
,
Eric A. Hendricks
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Derrick Herndon
,
William Q. Jeffries
,
Sharanya J. Majumdar
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James A. Moore
,
Zhaoxia Pu
,
Robert F. Rogers
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Elizabeth R. Sanabia
,
Gregory J. Tripoli
, and
Da-Lin Zhang

Abstract

Tropical cyclone (TC) outflow and its relationship to TC intensity change and structure were investigated in the Office of Naval Research Tropical Cyclone Intensity (TCI) field program during 2015 using dropsondes deployed from the innovative new High-Definition Sounding System (HDSS) and remotely sensed observations from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), both on board the NASA WB-57 that flew in the lower stratosphere. Three noteworthy hurricanes were intensively observed with unprecedented horizontal resolution: Joaquin in the Atlantic and Marty and Patricia in the eastern North Pacific. Nearly 800 dropsondes were deployed from the WB-57 flight level of ∼60,000 ft (∼18 km), recording atmospheric conditions from the lower stratosphere to the surface, while HIRAD measured the surface winds in a 50-km-wide swath with a horizontal resolution of 2 km. Dropsonde transects with 4–10-km spacing through the inner cores of Hurricanes Patricia, Joaquin, and Marty depict the large horizontal and vertical gradients in winds and thermodynamic properties. An innovative technique utilizing GPS positions of the HDSS reveals the vortex tilt in detail not possible before. In four TCI flights over Joaquin, systematic measurements of a major hurricane’s outflow layer were made at high spatial resolution for the first time. Dropsondes deployed at 4-km intervals as the WB-57 flew over the center of Hurricane Patricia reveal in unprecedented detail the inner-core structure and upper-tropospheric outflow associated with this historic hurricane. Analyses and numerical modeling studies are in progress to understand and predict the complex factors that influenced Joaquin’s and Patricia’s unusual intensity changes.

Open access