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James J. Hack

Abstract

The implied meridional ocean energy transport diagnosed from uncoupled integrations of two atmospheric general circulation models—the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model versions 2 and 3 (CCM2 and CCM3)—shows radically different transport characteristics throughout much of the Southern Hemisphere. The CCM2 simulation requires an equatorward transport of energy by the oceans, and the CCM3 exhibits a poleward energy transport requirement, very similar to what is derived from observational analyses. Previous studies have suggested that errors in the implied ocean energy transport are largely attributable to errors in the simulated cloud radiative forcing. The results of this analysis show that although the proper simulation of the radiative effects of clouds is likely to be a necessary condition for realistic meridional ocean energy transport, it is not sufficient. Important changes in the CCM3 equatorial surface latent heat fluxes, associated with a deep formulation for parameterized moist convection, are primarily responsible for the improved ocean energy transport, where this change in the surface energy budget is much more weakly reflected in top-of-atmosphere differences in cloud radiative forcing.

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James J. Hack

Abstract

The accurate treatment of clouds and their radiative properties is widely regarded to be among the most important problems facing global climate modeling. A number of the more serious systematic simulation biases in the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2) appear to be related to deficiencies in the treatment of cloud optical properties. In this paper, a simple diagnostic parameterization for cloud liquid water is presented. The sensitivity of the simulated climate to this alternative formulation, both in terms of mean climate metrics and measures of the climate system response, is illustrated. Resulting simulations show significant reductions in CCM2 systematic biases, particularly with respect to surface temperature, precipitation, and extratropical geopotential height-field anomalies. Many aspects of the simulated response to ENSO forcing are also substantially improved.

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James J. Hack
and
John A. Pedretti

Abstract

Single-column models (SCMs) have been extensively promoted in recent years as an effective means to develop and test physical parameterizations targeted for more complex three-dimensional climate models. Although there are some clear advantages associated with single-column modeling, there are also some significant disadvantages, including the absence of large-scale feedbacks. Basic limitations of an SCM framework can make it difficult to interpret solutions, and at times contribute to rather striking failures to identify even first-order sensitivities as they would be observed in a global climate simulation. This manuscript will focus on one of the basic experimental approaches currently exploited by the single-column modeling community, with an emphasis on establishing the inherent uncertainties in the numerical solutions. The analysis will employ the standard physics package from the NCAR CCM3 and will illustrate the nature of solution uncertainties that arise from nonlinearities in parameterized physics. The results of this study suggest the need to make use of an ensemble methodology when conducting single-column modeling investigations.

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James J. Hack
,
Jeffrey T. Kiehl
, and
James W. Hurrell

Abstract

Climatological properties for selected aspects of the thermodynamic structure and hydrologic cycle are presented from a 15-yr numerical simulation conducted with the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model, version 3 (CCM3), using an observed sea surface temperature climatology. In most regards, the simulated thermal structure and hydrologic cycle represent a marked improvement when compared with earlier versions of the CCM. Three major modifications to parameterized physics are primarily responsible for the more notable improvements in the simulation: modifications to the diagnosis of cloud optical properties, modifications to the diagnosis of boundary layer processes, and the incorporation of a penetrative formulation for deep cumulus convection. The various roles of these physical parameterization changes will be discussed in the context of the simulation strengths and weaknesses.

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Ping Zhu
,
James J. Hack
, and
Jeffrey T. Kiehl

Abstract

In this study, it is shown that the NCAR and GFDL GCMs exhibit a marked difference in climate sensitivity of clouds and radiative fluxes in response to doubled CO2 and ±2-K SST perturbations. The GFDL model predicted a substantial decrease in cloud amount and an increase in cloud condensate in the warmer climate, but produced a much weaker change in net cloud radiative forcing (CRF) than the NCAR model. Using a multiple linear regression (MLR) method, the full-sky radiative flux change at the top of the atmosphere was successfully decomposed into individual components associated with the clear sky and different types of clouds. The authors specifically examined the cloud feedbacks due to the cloud amount and cloud condensate changes involving low, mid-, and high clouds between 60°S and 60°N. It was found that the NCAR and GFDL models predicted the same sign of individual longwave and shortwave feedbacks resulting from the change in cloud amount and cloud condensate for all three types of clouds (low, mid, and high) despite the different cloud and radiation schemes used in the models. However, since the individual longwave and shortwave feedbacks resulting from the change in cloud amount and cloud condensate generally have the opposite signs, the net cloud feedback is a subtle residual of all. Strong cancellations between individual cloud feedbacks may result in a weak net cloud feedback. This result is consistent with the findings of the previous studies, which used different approaches to diagnose cloud feedbacks. This study indicates that the proposed MLR approach provides an easy way to efficiently expose the similarity and discrepancy of individual cloud feedback processes between GCMs, which are hidden in the total cloud feedback measured by CRF. Most importantly, this method has the potential to be applied to satellite measurements. Thus, it may serve as a reliable and efficient method to investigate cloud feedback mechanisms on short-term scales by comparing simulations with available observations, which may provide a useful way to identify the cause for the wide spread of cloud feedbacks in GCMs.

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Jeffrey T. Kiehl
,
Julie M. Caron
, and
James J. Hack

Abstract

Climate model simulations of the latter part of the twentieth century indicate a warming of the troposphere that is equal to or larger than the warming at the surface, while satellite observations from the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) indicate little warming of the troposphere relative to surface observations. Recently, Fu et al. proposed a new approach to retrieving free tropospheric temperature trends from MSU data that better accounts for stratospheric cooling, which contaminates the tropospheric signal and leads to a smaller trend in tropospheric warming. In this study, climate model simulations are used as a self-consistent dataset to test these retrieval algorithms. The two methods of retrieving tropospheric temperature trends are applied to three climate model simulations of the twentieth century. The Fu et al. algorithm is found to be in very good agreement with the model-simulated tropospheric warming, indicating that it accurately accounts for cooling from the lower stratosphere.

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James W. Hurrell
,
James J. Hack
,
Dennis Shea
,
Julie M. Caron
, and
James Rosinski

Abstract

A new surface boundary forcing dataset for uncoupled simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model is described. It is a merged product based on the monthly mean Hadley Centre sea ice and SST dataset version 1 (HadISST1) and version 2 of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weekly optimum interpolation (OI) SST analysis. These two source datasets were also used to supply ocean surface information to the 40-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis (ERA-40). The merged product provides monthly mean sea surface temperature and sea ice concentration data from 1870 to the present: it is updated monthly, and it is freely available for community use. The merging procedure was designed to take full advantage of the higher-resolution SST information inherent in the NOAA OI.v2 analysis.

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Byron A. Boville
,
Philip J. Rasch
,
James J. Hack
, and
James R. McCaa

Abstract

The parameterizations of clouds and precipitation processes have been revised considerably in the Community Atmosphere Model version 3 (CAM3) compared to its predecessors, CAM2 and the Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3). The parameterizations in CAM3 are more realistic in their representation of processes affecting cloud liquid and ice particles and represent the linkages between processes more completely. This paper describes the changes to the representation of clouds in CAM3, including the partitioning of cloud water between liquid and ice phases, the determination of particle sizes and sedimentation rates, the phase and evaporation rate of precipitation, and the calculation of the cloud fraction.

Parameterization changes between CCM3 and CAM2 introduced a significant cold bias at the tropical tropopause, resulting in a dry bias for stratospheric water vapor. Tests of the sensitivity of the tropical temperature profile and the tropical tropopause temperature to individual process changes suggested that the radiative balance at the tropopause was altered by improvements in both clouds and relative humidity below. Radiative equilibrium calculations suggested that the cold bias could be removed by improving the representation of subvisible cirrus clouds. These results motivated the complete separation of the representation of liquid and ice cloud particles and an examination of the processes that determine their sources and sinks. As a result of these changes, the tropopause cold bias has been almost eliminated in CAM3.

The total cloud condensate variable, used in CAM2, has been separated into cloud liquid and cloud ice variables in CAM3. Both sedimentation and large-scale transport of the condensate variables are now included. Snowfall is computed explicitly and the latent heat of fusion has been included for all freezing and melting processes. Both deep and shallow convection parameterizations now detrain cloud condensate directly into the stratiform clouds instead of evaporating the detrained condensate into the environment. The convective parameterizations are not easily modified to include the latent heat of fusion. Therefore, the determination of the phase of convective precipitation, and of detrained condensate, is added as a separate step. Evaporation is included for sedimenting cloud particles and for all sources of precipitation.

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James W. Hurrell
,
James J. Hack
,
Adam S. Phillips
,
Julie Caron
, and
Jeffrey Yin

Abstract

The dynamical simulation of the latest version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM3) is examined, including the seasonal variation of its mean state and its interannual variability. An ensemble of integrations forced with observed monthly varying sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations is compared to coexisting observations. The most significant differences from the previous version of the model [Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3)] are associated with changes to the parameterized physics package. Results show that these changes have resulted in a modest improvement in the overall simulated climate; however, CAM3 continues to share many of the same biases exhibited by CCM3.

At sea level, CAM3 reproduces the basic observed patterns of the pressure field. Simulated surface pressures are higher than observed over the subtropics, however, an error consistent with an easterly bias in the simulated trade winds and low-latitude surface wind stress. The largest regional differences over the Northern Hemisphere (NH) occur where the simulated highs over the eastern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans are too strong during boreal winter, and erroneously low pressures at higher latitudes are most notable over Europe and Eurasia. Over the Southern Hemisphere (SH), the circumpolar Antarctic trough is too deep throughout the year.

The zonal wind structure in CAM3 is close to that observed, although the middle-latitude westerlies are too strong in both hemispheres throughout the year, consistent with errors in the simulated pressure field and the transient momentum fluxes. The observed patterns and magnitudes of upper-level divergent outflow are also well simulated by CAM3, a finding consistent with an improved and overall realistic simulation of tropical precipitation. There is, however, a tendency for the tropical precipitation maxima to remain in the NH throughout the year, while precipitation tends to be less than indicated by satellite estimates along the equator.

The CAM3 simulation of tropical intraseasonal variability is quite poor. In contrast, observed changes in tropical and subtropical precipitation and the atmospheric circulation changes associated with tropical interannual variability are well simulated. Similarly, principal modes of extratropical variability bear considerable resemblance to those observed, although biases in the mean state degrade the simulated structure of the leading mode of NH atmospheric variability.

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James W. Hurrell
,
James J. Hack
,
Byron A. Boville
,
David L. Williamson
, and
Jeffrey T. Kiehl

Abstract

The dynamical simulation of the standard configuration of the latest version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM3) is examined, including the seasonal variation of its mean state and its intraseasonal and interannual variability. A 15-yr integration in which the model is forced with observed monthly varying sea surface temperatures (SSTs) since 1979 is compared to coexisting observations. Results show that the most serious systematic errors in previous NCAR CCM versions have either been eliminated or substantially reduced.

At sea level, CCM3 reproduces the basic observed patterns of the pressure field very well. Simulated surface pressures are higher than observed over the subtropics, however, an error consistent with an easterly bias in the simulated trade winds and low-latitude surface wind stress. Amplitude errors and phase shifts of the subpolar low pressure centers over both hemispheres during winter produce the largest regional errors, which are on the order of 5 mb. In the upper troposphere, both the amplitude and location of the major circulation centers are very well captured by the model, in agreement with relatively small regional biases in the simulated winds. Errors in the zonal wind component at 200 mb are most notable between 40° and 50° lat of both hemispheres, where the modeled westerlies are stronger than observed especially over the Southern Hemisphere during winter. A ∼50% reduction in the magnitude of the zonally averaged westerly bias in the equatorial upper troposphere that plagued previous CCM versions can be attributed to a significantly improved tropical hydrologic cycle and reduced Walker circulation.

Over middle latitudes, the CCM3 realistically depicts the main storm tracks, although the transient kinetic energy is generally underestimated, especially over the summer hemispheres. Over lower latitudes, the model simulates tropical intraseasonal oscillations with marked seasonality in their occurrence. Typical periodicities, however, are near 20–30 days, which are shorter than observed, and the simulated amplitudes are weaker than in both observations and previous versions of the model. The simulated response to interannual variations in tropical SSTs is also realistic in CCM3. A simulated index of the Southern Oscillation agrees well with the observed, and the model captures the overall structure and magnitude of observed shifts in tropical and subtropical convergence zones and monthly rainfall anomalies associated with the tropical SST changes.

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