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  • Author or Editor: Jennifer Wei x
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Nicholas R. Nalli
,
Everette Joseph
,
Vernon R. Morris
,
Christopher D. Barnet
,
Walter W. Wolf
,
Daniel Wolfe
,
Peter J. Minnett
,
Malgorzata Szczodrak
,
Miguel A. Izaguirre
,
Rick Lumpkin
,
Hua Xie
,
Alexander Smirnov
,
Thomas S. King
, and
Jennifer Wei

This paper gives an overview of a unique set of ship-based atmospheric data acquired over the tropical Atlantic Ocean during boreal spring and summer as part of ongoing National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Aerosols and Ocean Science Expedition (AEROSE) field campaigns. Following the original 2004 campaign onboard the Ronald H. Brown, AEROSE has operated on a yearly basis since 2006 in collaboration with the NOAA Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA) Northeast Extension (PNE). In this work, attention is given to atmospheric soundings of ozone, temperature, water vapor, pressure, and wind obtained from ozonesondes and radiosondes launched to coincide with low earth orbit environmental satellite overpasses [MetOp and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) A-Train]. Data from the PNE/ AEROSE campaigns are unique in their range of marine meteorological phenomena germane to the satellite missions in question, including dust and smoke outflows from Africa, the Saharan air layer (SAL), and the distribution of tropical water vapor and tropical Atlantic ozone. The multiyear PNE/AEROSE sounding data are valuable as correlative data for prelaunch phase validation of the planned Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and NOAA Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellite R series (GOES-R) systems, as well as numerous other science applications. A brief summary of these data, along with an overview of some important science highlights, including meteorological phenomena of general interest, is presented.

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Xin-Zhong Liang
,
Drew Gower
,
Jennifer A. Kennedy
,
Melissa Kenney
,
Michael C. Maddox
,
Michael Gerst
,
Guillermo Balboa
,
Talon Becker
,
Ximing Cai
,
Roger Elmore
,
Wei Gao
,
Yufeng He
,
Kang Liang
,
Shane Lotton
,
Leena Malayil
,
Megan L. Matthews
,
Alison M. Meadow
,
Christopher M. U. Neale
,
Greg Newman
,
Amy Rebecca Sapkota
,
Sanghoon Shin
,
Jonathan Straube
,
Chao Sun
,
You Wu
,
Yun Yang
, and
Xuesong Zhang

Abstract

Climate change presents huge challenges to the already-complex decisions faced by U.S. agricultural producers, as seasonal weather patterns increasingly deviate from historical tendencies. Under USDA funding, a transdisciplinary team of researchers, extension experts, educators, and stakeholders is developing a climate decision support Dashboard for Agricultural Water use and Nutrient management (DAWN) to provide Corn Belt farmers with better predictive information. DAWN’s goal is to provide credible, usable information to support decisions by creating infrastructure to make subseasonal-to-seasonal forecasts accessible. DAWN uses an integrated approach to 1) engage stakeholders to coproduce a decision support and information delivery system; 2) build a coupled modeling system to represent and transfer holistic systems knowledge into effective tools; 3) produce reliable forecasts to help stakeholders optimize crop productivity and environmental quality; and 4) integrate research and extension into experiential, transdisciplinary education. This article presents DAWN’s framework for integrating climate–agriculture research, extension, and education to bridge science and service. We also present key challenges to the creation and delivery of decision support, specifically in infrastructure development, coproduction and trust building with stakeholders, product design, effective communication, and moving tools toward use.

Open access