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  • Author or Editor: Kenneth W. Johnson x
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Kenneth W. Johnson

Abstract

Development of a methodology for the optimal placement of multivariate sensors as an aid in the design of geophysical field experiments is shown. The optimal placement methodology relies on spatial correlation estimates, interpolation error estimates as provided by a multivariate optimal interpolation scheme, and optimization techniques using nonlinear programming. Atmospheric fields and their associated statistics are simulated by analytic functions to demonstrate the capabilities of the methodology. These include the ability to design new networks, to add sensors optimally to existing networks, and to place restrictions on the region in which sensors can be located by introducing physical and economical constraints on the nonlinear programming problem. It is demonstrated that the mean and variance of the interpolation error for all fields is generally smaller for analyses whose input is derived from optimal sampling locations rather than from subjectively chosen locations.

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Kenneth S. Johnson, Luke J. Coletti, Hans W. Jannasch, Carole M. Sakamoto, Dana D. Swift, and Stephen C. Riser

Abstract

Reagent-free optical nitrate sensors [in situ ultraviolet spectrophotometer (ISUS)] can be used to detect nitrate throughout most of the ocean. Although the sensor is a relatively high-power device when operated continuously (7.5 W typical), the instrument can be operated in a low-power mode, where individual nitrate measurements require only a few seconds of instrument time and the system consumes only 45 J of energy per nitrate measurement. Operation in this mode has enabled the integration of ISUS sensors with Teledyne Webb Research's Autonomous Profiling Explorer (APEX) profiling floats with a capability to operate to 2000 m. The energy consumed with each nitrate measurement is low enough to allow 60 nitrate observations on each vertical profile to 1000 m. Vertical resolution varies from 5 m near the surface to 50 m near 1000 m, and every 100 m below that. Primary lithium batteries allow more than 300 vertical profiles from a depth of 1000 m to be made, which corresponds to an endurance near four years at a 5-day cycle time. This study details the experience in integrating ISUS sensors into Teledyne Webb Research's APEX profiling floats and the results that have been obtained throughout the ocean for periods up to three years.

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Fred V. Brock, Kenneth C. Crawford, Ronald L. Elliott, Gerrit W. Cuperus, Steven J. Stadler, Howard L. Johnson, and Michael D. Eilts

Abstract

The Oklahoma mesonet is a joint project of Oklahoma State University and the University of Oklahoma. It is an automated network of 108 stations covering the state of Oklahoma. Each station measures air temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, rainfall, solar radiation, and soil temperatures. Each station transmits a data message every 15 min via a radio link to the nearest terminal of the Oklahoma Law Enforcement Telecommunications System that relays it to a central site in Norman, Oklahoma. The data message comprises three 5-min averages of most data (and one 15-min average of soil temperatures). The central site ingests the data, runs some quality assurance tests, archives the data, and disseminates it in real time to a broad community of users, primarily through a computerized bulletin board system. This manuscript provides a technical description of the Oklahoma mesonet including a complete description of the instrumentation. Sensor inaccuracy, resolution, height with respect to ground level, and method of exposure are discussed.

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