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  • Author or Editor: L. A. Sromovsky x
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L. A. Sromovsky
,
H. E. Revercomb
,
V. E. Suomi
,
S. S. Limaye
, and
R. J. Krauss

Abstract

Previous Voyager 1 and 2 Jovian circulation measurements exhibit a large positive correlation between eddy momentum transports and the meridional shear of the zonal wind component, implying a very large rate of conversion of eddy kinetic energy into kinetic energy of the zonal jets. Examination of the vectors mainly responsible for the correlation in our recent Voyager 2 global measurements indicates that it is probably caused by a biased sampling of prominent cloud features associated with circulating eddies. Intensive diagnostic measurements with more nearly uniform spatial sampling show no significant correlation in regions where our original measurements showed strong correlations. If the sampling bias mechanism is fully accounted for in all Jovian circulation measurements, the estimated eddy-to-mean-flow kinetic energy conversion rate may be reduced significantly.

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S. S. Limaye
,
H. E. Revercomb
,
L. A. Sromovsky
,
R. J. Krauss
,
D. A. Santek
,
V. E. Suomi
,
S. A. Collins
, and
C. C. Avis

Abstract

Independent measurements of Jovian cloud motions confirm previously published results on the general structure of Jupiter's zonal mean circulation. The new results are based on Voyager 2 images and measurement techniques which are different from those used in previous studies. The latitudes of the zonal jets agree with previous results, but there are some differences in the measured speed of the jets which exceed uncertainty estimates. These differences may be due to differences in sampling strategies. The structure of the zonal mean meridional velocity profile has still not been clearly resolved: mean meridional velocities generally differ from zero by no more than their estimated uncertainty. An analysis of successive measurements of the same cloud targets shows that most of the variance of individual velocity measurements is due to true variability of the winds. In agreement with the previous results the curvature of the zonal velocity profile is consistent with barotropic instability within most easterly jets, although the cloud morphologies visible in the images do not confirm that large-scale instabilities actually exist in these regions. Baroclinic effects may also be important in these regions. Large differences among independent estimates of eddy momentum transport indicate that this quantity has yet to be reliably determined.

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