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  • Author or Editor: Marian Mateling x
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Tristan S. L’Ecuyer
,
Brian J. Drouin
,
James Anheuser
,
Meredith Grames
,
David Henderson
,
Xianglei Huang
,
Brian H. Kahn
,
Jennifer E. Kay
,
Boon H. Lim
,
Marian Mateling
,
Aronne Merrelli
,
Nathaniel B. Miller
,
Sharmila Padmanabhan
,
Colten Peterson
,
Nicole-Jeanne Schlegel
,
Mary L. White
, and
Yan Xie

Abstract

The Earth’s climate is strongly influenced by energy deficits at the poles that emit more thermal energy than they receive from the sun. Energy exchanges between the surface and atmosphere influence the local environment while heat transport from lower latitudes drives midlatitude atmospheric and oceanic circulations. In the Arctic, in particular, local energy imbalances induce strong seasonality in surface-atmosphere heat exchanges and an acute sensitivity to forced climate variations. Despite these important local and global influences, the largest contributions to the polar atmospheric and surface energy budgets have not been fully characterized. The spectral variation of far-infrared radiation that makes up 60% of polar thermal emission has never been systematically measured impeding progress toward consensus in predicted rates of Arctic warming, sea ice decline, and ice sheet melt.

Enabled by recent advances in sensor miniaturization and CubeSat technology, the Polar Radiant Energy in the Far InfraRed Experiment (PREFIRE) mission will document, for the first time, the spectral, spatial, and temporal variations of polar far-infrared emission. Selected under NASA’s Earth Ventures Instrument (EVI) program, PREFIRE will utilize new light weight, low-power, ambient temperature detectors capable of measuring at wavelengths up to 50 micrometers to quantify Earth’s far-infrared spectrum. Estimates of spectral surface emissivity, water vapor, cloud properties, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect derived from these measurements offer the potential to advance our understanding of the factors that modulate thermal fluxes in the cold, dry conditions characteristic of the polar regions.

Full access
Mark S. Kulie
,
Claire Pettersen
,
Aronne J. Merrelli
,
Timothy J. Wagner
,
Norman B. Wood
,
Michael Dutter
,
David Beachler
,
Todd Kluber
,
Robin Turner
,
Marian Mateling
,
John Lenters
,
Peter Blanken
,
Maximilian Maahn
,
Christopher Spence
,
Stefan Kneifel
,
Paul A. Kucera
,
Ali Tokay
,
Larry F. Bliven
,
David B. Wolff
, and
Walter A. Petersen

BAMS Capsule:

Profiling radar and ground-based in situ observations reveal the ubiquity of snowfall produced by shallow clouds, the importance of near-surface snowfall enhancement processes, and regime-dependent snow particle microphysical variability in the Northern Great Lakes Region.

Full access
Tristan S. L’Ecuyer
,
Brian J. Drouin
,
James Anheuser
,
Meredith Grames
,
David S. Henderson
,
Xianglei Huang
,
Brian H. Kahn
,
Jennifer E. Kay
,
Boon H. Lim
,
Marian Mateling
,
Aronne Merrelli
,
Nathaniel B. Miller
,
Sharmila Padmanabhan
,
Colten Peterson
,
Nicole-Jeanne Schlegel
,
Mary L. White
, and
Yan Xie

Abstract

Earth’s climate is strongly influenced by energy deficits at the poles that emit more thermal energy than they receive from the sun. Energy exchanges between the surface and atmosphere influence the local environment while heat transport from lower latitudes drives midlatitude atmospheric and oceanic circulations. In the Arctic, in particular, local energy imbalances induce strong seasonality in surface–atmosphere heat exchanges and an acute sensitivity to forced climate variations. Despite these important local and global influences, the largest contributions to the polar atmospheric and surface energy budgets have not been fully characterized. The spectral variation of far-infrared radiation that makes up 60% of polar thermal emission has never been systematically measured impeding progress toward consensus in predicted rates of Arctic warming, sea ice decline, and ice sheet melt. Enabled by recent advances in sensor miniaturization and CubeSat technology, the Polar Radiant Energy in the Far Infrared Experiment (PREFIRE) mission will document, for the first time, the spectral, spatial, and temporal variations of polar far-infrared emission. Selected under NASA’s Earth Ventures Instrument (EVI) program, PREFIRE will utilize new lightweight, low-power, ambient temperature detectors capable of measuring at wavelengths up to 50 μm to quantify Earth’s far-infrared spectrum. Estimates of spectral surface emissivity, water vapor, cloud properties, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect derived from these measurements offer the potential to advance our understanding of the factors that modulate thermal fluxes in the cold, dry conditions characteristic of the polar regions.

Full access
Mark S. Kulie
,
Claire Pettersen
,
Aronne J. Merrelli
,
Timothy J. Wagner
,
Norman B. Wood
,
Michael Dutter
,
David Beachler
,
Todd Kluber
,
Robin Turner
,
Marian Mateling
,
John Lenters
,
Peter Blanken
,
Maximilian Maahn
,
Christopher Spence
,
Stefan Kneifel
,
Paul A. Kucera
,
Ali Tokay
,
Larry F. Bliven
,
David B. Wolff
, and
Walter A. Petersen

Abstract

A multisensor snowfall observational suite has been deployed at the Marquette, Michigan, National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office (KMQT) since 2014. Micro Rain Radar (MRR; profiling radar), Precipitation Imaging Package (PIP; snow particle imager), and ancillary ground-based meteorological observations illustrate the unique capabilities of these combined instruments to document radar and concomitant microphysical properties associated with northern Great Lakes snowfall regimes. Lake-effect, lake-orographic, and transition event case studies are presented that illustrate the variety of snowfall events that occur at KMQT. Case studies and multiyear analyses reveal the ubiquity of snowfall produced by shallow events. These shallow snowfall features and their distinctive microphysical fingerprints are often difficult to discern with conventional remote sensing instruments, thus highlighting the scientific and potential operational value of MRR and PIP observations. The importance of near-surface lake-orographic snowfall enhancement processes in extreme snowfall events and regime-dependent snow particle microphysical variability controlled by regime and environmental factors are also highlighted.

Full access