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  • Author or Editor: O. E. Smith x
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C. G. Justus
,
R. G. Roper
,
Arthur Woodrum
, and
O. E. Smith

Abstract

An empirical atmospheric model has been developed which generates values for pressure, density, temperature and winds from surface levels to orbital altitudes. The output parameters consist of components for: 1) latitude, longitude, and altitude dependent monthly means; 2) quasibiennial oscillations; and 3) random perturbations to partially simulate the variability due to synoptic, diurnal, planetary wave and gravity wave variations. The monthly mean models consist of: (i) NASA's four dimensional worldwide model, developed by Environmental Research and Technology, for height, latitude, and longitude dependent monthly means from the surface to 25 km; and (ii) a newly developed latitude-longitude dependent model which is an extension of the Groves latitude dependent model for the region between 25 and 90 km. The Jacchia 1970 model is used above 90 km and is faired with the modified Groves values between 90 and 115 km. Quasibiennial and random variation perturbations are computed from parameters determined from various empirical studies, and are added to the monthly mean values. This model has been developed as a computer program which can be used to generate altitude profiles of atmospheric variables for any month at any desired location, or to evaluate atmospheric parameters along any simulated trajectory through the atmosphere. Various applications of the model are discussed, and results are presented which show that good simulation of the thermodynamic and circulation characteristics of the atmosphere can be achieved with the model.

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Wayne F. Feltz
,
William L. Smith
,
Robert O. Knuteson
,
Henry E. Revercomb
,
Harold M. Woolf
, and
H. Ben Howell

Abstract

The Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) is a well-calibrated ground-based instrument that measures high-resolution atmospheric emitted radiances from the atmosphere. The spectral resolution of the instrument is better than one wavenumber between 3 and 18 μm within the infrared spectrum. The AERI instrument detects vertical and temporal changes of temperature and water vapor in the planetary boundary layer. Excellent agreement between radiosonde and AERI retrievals for a 6-month sample of coincident profiles is presented in this paper. In addition, a statistical seasonal analysis of retrieval and radiosonde differences is discussed. High temporal and moderate vertical resolution in the lowest 3 km of the atmosphere allows meteorologically important mesoscale features to be detected. AERI participation in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (SGP CART) has allowed development of a robust operational atmospheric temperature and water vapor retrieval algorithm in a dynamic meteorological environment near Lamont, Oklahoma. Operating in a continuous mode, AERI temperature and water vapor retrievals obtained through inversion of the infrared radiative transfer equation provide profiles of atmospheric state every 10 min to 3 km in clear sky or below cloud base. Boundary layer evolution, cold or warm frontal passages, drylines, and thunderstorm outflow boundaries are all recorded, offering important meteorological information. With important vertical thermodynamic information between radiosonde locations and launch times, AERI retrievals provide data for planetary boundary layer research, mesoscale model initialization, verification, and nowcasting. This paper discusses retrieval performance at the SGP CART site, as well as interesting meteorological case studies captured by AERI profiles. The AERI system represents an important new capability for operational weather- and airport-monitoring applications.

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W. F. Feltz
,
W. L. Smith
,
H. B. Howell
,
R. O. Knuteson
,
H. Woolf
, and
H. E. Revercomb

Abstract

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) has funded the development and installation of five ground-based atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) systems at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the AERI instrument, improvement of the AERI temperature and moisture retrieval technique, new profiling utility, and validation of high-temporal-resolution AERI-derived stability indices important for convective nowcasting. AERI systems have been built at the University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, and deployed in the Oklahoma–Kansas area collocated with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 404-MHz wind profilers at Lamont, Vici, Purcell, and Morris, Oklahoma, and Hillsboro, Kansas. The AERI systems produce absolutely calibrated atmospheric infrared emitted radiances at one-wavenumber resolution from 3 to 20 μm at less than 10-min temporal resolution. The instruments are robust, are automated in the field, and are monitored via the Internet in near–real time. The infrared radiances measured by the AERI systems contain meteorological information about the vertical structure of temperature and water vapor in the planetary boundary layer (PBL; 0–3 km). A mature temperature and water vapor retrieval algorithm has been developed over a 10-yr period that provides vertical profiles at less than 10-min temporal resolution to 3 km in the PBL. A statistical retrieval is combined with the hourly Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) sounder water vapor or Rapid Update Cycle, version 2, numerical weather prediction (NWP) model profiles to provide a nominal hybrid first guess of temperature and moisture to the AERI physical retrieval algorithm. The hourly satellite or NWP data provide a best estimate of the atmospheric state in the upper PBL; the AERI radiances provide the mesoscale temperature and moisture profile correction in the PBL to the large-scale GOES and NWP model profiles at high temporal resolution. The retrieval product has been named AERIplus because the first guess used for the mathematical physical inversion uses an optimal combination of statistical climatological, satellite, and numerical model data to provide a best estimate of the atmospheric state. The AERI physical retrieval algorithm adjusts the boundary layer temperature and moisture structure provided by the hybrid first guess to fit the observed AERI downwelling radiance measurement. This provides a calculated AERI temperature and moisture profile using AERI-observed radiances “plus” the best-known atmospheric state above the boundary layer using NWP or satellite data. AERIplus retrieval accuracy for temperature has been determined to be better than 1 K, and water vapor retrieval accuracy is approximately 5% in absolute water vapor when compared with well-calibrated radiosondes from the surface to an altitude of 3 km. Because AERI can monitor the thermodynamics where the atmosphere usually changes most rapidly, atmospheric stability tendency information is readily available from the system. High-temporal-resolution retrieval of convective available potential energy, convective inhibition, and PBL equivalent potential temperature θ e are provided in near–real time from all five AERI systems at the ARM SGP site, offering a unique look at the atmospheric state. This new source of meteorological data has shown excellent skill in detecting rapid synoptic and mesoscale meteorological changes within clear atmospheric conditions. This method has utility in nowcasting temperature inversion strength and destabilization caused by θ e advection. This high-temporal-resolution monitoring of rapid atmospheric destabilization is especially important for nowcasting severe convection.

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W. L. Smith
,
H. E. Revercomb
,
H. B. Howell
,
H-L. Huang
,
R. O. Knuteson
,
E. W. Koenig
,
D. D. LaPorte
,
S. Silverman
,
L. A. Sromovsky
, and
H. M. Woolf

Abstract

A high spectral resolution interferometer sounder (GHIS) has been designed for flight on future geostationary meteorological satellites. It incorporates the measurement principles of an aircraft prototype instrument, which has demonstrated the capability to observe the earth-emitted radiance spectrum with high accuracy. The aircraft results indicate that the theoretical expectation of 1°C temperature and 2°–3°C dewpoint retrieval accuracy will be achieved. The vertical resolution of the water vapor profile appears good enough to enable moisture tracking in numerous vertical layers thereby providing wind profile information as well as thermodynamic profiles of temperature and water vapor.

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C. Kummerow
,
J. Simpson
,
O. Thiele
,
W. Barnes
,
A. T. C. Chang
,
E. Stocker
,
R. F. Adler
,
A. Hou
,
R. Kakar
,
F. Wentz
,
P. Ashcroft
,
T. Kozu
,
Y. Hong
,
K. Okamoto
,
T. Iguchi
,
H. Kuroiwa
,
E. Im
,
Z. Haddad
,
G. Huffman
,
B. Ferrier
,
W. S. Olson
,
E. Zipser
,
E. A. Smith
,
T. T. Wilheit
,
G. North
,
T. Krishnamurti
, and
K. Nakamura

Abstract

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was launched on 27 November 1997, and data from all the instruments first became available approximately 30 days after the launch. Since then, much progress has been made in the calibration of the sensors, the improvement of the rainfall algorithms, and applications of these results to areas such as data assimilation and model initialization. The TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) calibration has been corrected and verified to account for a small source of radiation leaking into the TMI receiver. The precipitation radar calibration has been adjusted upward slightly (by 0.6 dBZ) to match better the ground reference targets; the visible and infrared sensor calibration remains largely unchanged. Two versions of the TRMM rainfall algorithms are discussed. The at-launch (version 4) algorithms showed differences of 40% when averaged over the global Tropics over 30-day periods. The improvements to the rainfall algorithms that were undertaken after launch are presented, and intercomparisons of these products (version 5) show agreement improving to 24% for global tropical monthly averages. The ground-based radar rainfall product generation is discussed. Quality-control issues have delayed the routine production of these products until the summer of 2000, but comparisons of TRMM products with early versions of the ground validation products as well as with rain gauge network data suggest that uncertainties among the TRMM algorithms are of approximately the same magnitude as differences between TRMM products and ground-based rainfall estimates. The TRMM field experiment program is discussed to describe active areas of measurements and plans to use these data for further algorithm improvements. In addition to the many papers in this special issue, results coming from the analysis of TRMM products to study the diurnal cycle, the climatological description of the vertical profile of precipitation, storm types, and the distribution of shallow convection, as well as advances in data assimilation of moisture and model forecast improvements using TRMM data, are discussed in a companion TRMM special issue in the Journal of Climate (1 December 2000, Vol. 13, No. 23).

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