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William L. Smith
,
Xia Lin Ma
,
Steven A. Ackerman
,
H. E. Revercomb
, and
R. O. Knuteson

Abstract

A technique for estimating cloud radiative properties (i.e., spectral emissivity and reflectivity) in the infrared is developed based on observations at a spectral resolution of approximately 0.5 cm−1. The algorithm makes use of spectral radiance observations and theoretical calculations of the infrared spectra for clear and cloudy conditions along with lidar-determined cloud-base and cloud-top pressure. An advantage of the high spectral resolution observations is that the absorption effects of atmospheric gases are minimized by analyzing between gaseous absorption lines. The technique is applicable to both ground-based and aircraft-based platforms and derives the effective particle size and associated cloud water content required to satisfy, theoretically, the observed cloud infrared spectra. The algorithm is tested using theoretical simulations and applied to observations made with the University of Wisconsin's ground-based and NASA ER-2 aircraft High-Resolution Infrared Spectrometer instruments.

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W. L. Smith
,
H. E. Revercomb
,
R. O. Knuteson
,
F. A. Best
,
R. Dedecker
,
H. B. Howell
, and
H. M. Woolf

Abstract

The characteristics of the ER-2 aircraft and ground-based High Resolution Interferometer Sounder (HIS) instruments deployed during FIRE II are described. A few example spectra are given to illustrate the HIS cloud and molecular atmosphere remote sensing capabilities.

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S. A. Ackerman
,
W. L. Smith
,
A. D. Collard
,
X. L. Ma
,
H. E. Revercomb
, and
R. O. Knuteson

Abstract

This paper parts analysis of cloud observations by the High-Resolution Interferometer Sounder made from the NASA ER-2 aircraft during FIRE II. Clear and cloudy sky radiance spectra are presented in terms of differences between observations and radiative transfer model simulations.

Doubling/adding radiative transfer model simulations demonstrate that the magnitude of the brightness temperature differences (ΔBT) is a function of the cloud particle size distribution and the cloud ice water path. For effective radii greater than approximately 30 µm (size parameter of 18) there is little spectral variation in the brightness temperature (BT). An analysis of brightness temperature differences indicates that cirrus clouds over the FIRE II central site possessed a small-particle mode. The cases analyzed had similar appearances in a plot of ΔBT between 11 and 12 µm (BT11 – BT12) versus the observed ΔBT between 8 and 11 µm (BT8 – BT11), suggesting similarity in the microphysical properties of nongray cirrus. Brightness temperature differences between cirrus cloud over the central site and the Gulf of Mexico are presented to illustrate differences in the cirrus microphysical properties at the two different locations.

Cloud effective emissivities and effective radiative temperature were derived for observations over the FIRE central site using complementary lidar and radiosonde data. Small variations in these effective properties were seen on 5 December and 22 November. Although they had similar effective temperatures, the emissivities were very different. Very few clouds were observed to have an emissivity near unity.

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A. D. Collard
,
S. A. Ackerman
,
W. L. Smith
,
X. Ma
,
H. E. Revercomb
,
R. O. Knuteson
, and
S-C. Lee

Abstract

During FIRE II, cirrus clouds were observed in the wavelength range 3–19, µm with two High Resolution Interferometer Sounders as described in the Part I companion paper. One, known as AC-HIS, was mounted on the NASA ER-2 aircraft in order to look down on the clouds; these results are described in the Part II companion paper. The other, GB-HIS, also known as the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), was ground based. The AERI observations have been simulated, assuming scattering from spherical ice particles, using a single-layer doubling model for the cloud, for two atmospheric windows at 700–1250 and 2650–3000 cm−1. The second of these windows is affected by scattered sunlight, which has been included in the calculations. The sensitivity of the cloud signal to quantities such as the ice water path (IWP) and effective radius (r eff) have been determined. Using the cloud model, best fits have been derived for IWP and r eff, for both windows individually and together. Possible errors in these derivations have been investigated.

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W. L. Smith Sr.
,
D. K. Zhou
,
A. M. Larar
,
S. A. Mango
,
H. B. Howell
,
R. O. Knuteson
,
H. E. Revercomb
, and
W. L. Smith Jr.

Abstract

During the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS), the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Airborne Sounder Testbed-Interferometer (NAST-I), flying aboard the high-altitude Proteus aircraft, observed the spatial distribution of infrared radiance across the 650–2700 cm−1 (3.7–15.4 μm) spectral region with a spectral resolution of 0.25 cm−1. NAST-I scans cross track with a moderate spatial resolution (a linear ground resolution equal to 13% of the aircraft altitude at nadir). The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of this instrument provides abundant information about the surface and three-dimensional state of the atmosphere. In this paper, the NAST-I measurements and geophysical product retrieval methodology employed for CLAMS are described. Example results of surface properties and atmospheric temperature, water vapor, ozone, and carbon monoxide distributions are provided. The CLAMS NAST-I geophysical dataset is available for use by the scientific community.

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D. D. Turner
,
D. C. Tobin
,
S. A. Clough
,
P. D. Brown
,
R. G. Ellingson
,
E. J. Mlawer
,
R. O. Knuteson
,
H. E. Revercomb
,
T. R. Shippert
,
W. L. Smith
, and
M. W. Shephard

Abstract

Research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has led to significant improvements in longwave radiative transfer modeling over the last decade. These improvements, which have generally come in small incremental changes, were made primarily in the water vapor self- and foreign-broadened continuum and the water vapor absorption line parameters. These changes, when taken as a whole, result in up to a 6 W m−2 improvement in the modeled clear-sky downwelling longwave radiative flux at the surface and significantly better agreement with spectral observations. This paper provides an overview of the history of ARM with regard to clear-sky longwave radiative transfer, and analyzes remaining related uncertainties in the ARM state-of-the-art Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM).

A quality measurement experiment (QME) for the downwelling infrared radiance at the ARM Southern Great Plains site has been ongoing since 1994. This experiment has three objectives: 1) to validate and improve the absorption models and spectral line parameters used in line-by-line radiative transfer models, 2) to assess the ability to define the atmospheric state, and 3) to assess the quality of the radiance observations that serve as ground truth for the model. Analysis of data from 1994 to 1997 made significant contributions to optimizing the QME, but is limited by small but significant uncertainties and deficiencies in the atmospheric state and radiance observations. This paper concentrates on the analysis of QME data from 1998 to 2001, wherein the data have been carefully selected to address the uncertainties in the 1994–97 dataset. Analysis of this newer dataset suggests that the representation of self-broadened water vapor continuum absorption is 3%–8% too strong in the 750–1000 cm−1 region. The dataset also provides information on the accuracy of the self- and foreign-broadened continuum absorption in the 1100–1300 cm−1 region. After accounting for these changes, remaining differences in modeled and observed downwelling clear-sky fluxes are less than 1.5 W m−2 over a wide range of atmospheric states.

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Kevin J. Noone
,
Elisabeth Öström
,
Ronald J. Ferek
,
Tim Garrett
,
Peter V. Hobbs
,
Doug W. Johnson
,
Jonathan P. Taylor
,
Lynn M. Russell
,
Richard C. Flagan
,
John H. Seinfeld
,
Colin D. O’Dowd
,
Michael H. Smith
,
Philip A. Durkee
,
Kurt Nielsen
,
James G. Hudson
,
Robert A. Pockalny
,
Lieve De Bock
,
René E. Van Grieken
,
Richard F. Gasparovic
, and
Ian Brooks

Abstract

The effects of anthropogenic particulate emissions from ships on the radiative, microphysical, and chemical properties of moderately polluted marine stratiform clouds are examined. A case study of two ships in the same air mass is presented where one of the vessels caused a discernible ship track while the other did not. In situ measurements of cloud droplet size distributions, liquid water content, and cloud radiative properties, as well as aerosol size distributions (outside cloud, interstitial, and cloud droplet residual particles) and aerosol chemistry, are presented. These are related to measurements of cloud radiative properties. The differences between the aerosol in the two ship plumes are discussed;these indicate that combustion-derived particles in the size range of about 0.03–0.3-μm radius were those that caused the microphysical changes in the clouds that were responsible for the ship track.

The authors examine the processes behind ship track formation in a moderately polluted marine boundary layer as an example of the effects that anthropogenic particulate pollution can have in the albedo of marine stratiform clouds.

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Kevin J. Noone
,
Doug W. Johnson
,
Jonathan P. Taylor
,
Ronald J. Ferek
,
Tim Garrett
,
Peter V. Hobbs
,
Philip A. Durkee
,
Kurt Nielsen
,
Elisabeth Öström
,
Colin O’Dowd
,
Michael H. Smith
,
Lynn M. Russell
,
Richard C. Flagan
,
John H. Seinfeld
,
Lieve De Bock
,
René E. Van Grieken
,
James G. Hudson
,
Ian Brooks
,
Richard F. Gasparovic
, and
Robert A. Pockalny

Abstract

A case study of the effects of ship emissions on the microphysical, radiative, and chemical properties of polluted marine boundary layer clouds is presented. Two ship tracks are discussed in detail. In situ measurements of cloud drop size distributions, liquid water content, and cloud radiative properties, as well as aerosol size distributions (outside-cloud, interstitial, and cloud droplet residual particles) and aerosol chemistry, are presented. These are related to remotely sensed measurements of cloud radiative properties.

The authors examine the processes behind ship track formation in a polluted marine boundary layer as an example of the effects of anthropogenic particulate pollution on the albedo of marine stratiform clouds.

Full access