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  • Author or Editor: Piotr J. Flatau x
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Maria K. Flatau
,
Piotr J. Flatau
, and
Daniel Rudnick

Abstract

Double monsoon onset develops when the strong convection in the Bay of Bengal is accompanied by the monsoonlike circulation and appears in the Indian Ocean in early May, which is about 3 weeks earlier than the climatological date of the onset (1 Jun). The initial “bogus onset” is followed by the flow weakening or reversal and clear-sky and dry conditions over the monsoon region. The best example of such a phenomenon is the development of the summer monsoon in 1995, when monsoonlike perturbations that appeared in mid-May disappeared by the end of the month and were followed by a heat wave in India, delaying onset of the monsoon. The climatology of double onsets is analyzed, and it is shown that they are associated with delay of the monsoon rainfall over India. This analysis indicates that the development of bogus onsets depends on the timing of intraseasonal oscillation in the Indian Ocean and the propagation of convective episodes into the western Pacific. There is evidence that an SST evolution in the Bay of Bengal and the western Pacific plays an important role in this phenomenon. It is shown that in the case of the double monsoon onset it is possible to predict hot and dry conditions in India before the real monsoon onset. In the 32 yr of climatological data, six cases of double monsoon onset were identified.

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Adrian J. Matthews
,
Dariusz B. Baranowski
,
Karen J. Heywood
,
Piotr J. Flatau
, and
Sunke Schmidtko

Abstract

A surface diurnal warm layer is diagnosed from Seaglider observations and develops on half of the days in the Cooperative Indian Ocean Experiment on Intraseasonal Variability/Dynamics of the Madden–Julian Oscillation (CINDY/DYNAMO) Indian Ocean experiment. The diurnal warm layer occurs on days of high solar radiation flux (>80 W m−2) and low wind speed (<6 m s−1) and preferentially in the inactive stage of the Madden–Julian oscillation. Its diurnal harmonic has an exponential vertical structure with a depth scale of 4–5 m (dependent on chlorophyll concentration), consistent with forcing by absorption of solar radiation. The effective sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly due to the diurnal warm layer often reaches 0.8°C in the afternoon, with a daily mean of 0.2°C, rectifying the diurnal cycle onto longer time scales. This SST anomaly drives an anomalous flux of 4 W m−2 that cools the ocean. Alternatively, in a climate model where this process is unresolved, this represents an erroneous flux that warms the ocean. A simple model predicts a diurnal warm layer to occur on 30%–50% of days across the tropical warm pool. On the remaining days, with low solar radiation and high wind speeds, a residual diurnal cycle is observed by the Seaglider, with a diurnal harmonic of temperature that decreases linearly with depth. As wind speed increases, this already weak temperature gradient decreases further, tending toward isothermal conditions.

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