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  • Author or Editor: R. Boers x
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Arthur J. Miller
,
Michael A. Alexander
,
George J. Boer
,
Fei Chai
,
Ken Denman
,
David J. Erickson III
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Robert Frouin
,
Albert J. Gabric
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Edward A. Laws
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Marlon R. Lewis
,
Zhengyu Liu
,
Ragu Murtugudde
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Shoichiro Nakamoto
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Douglas J. Neilson
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Joel R. Norris
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J. Carter Ohlmann
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R. Ian Perry
,
Niklas Schneider
,
Karen M. Shell
, and
Axel Timmermann
Full access
D. R. Feldman
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A. C. Aiken
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W. R. Boos
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R. W. H. Carroll
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V. Chandrasekar
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S. Collis
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J. M. Creamean
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G. de Boer
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J. Deems
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P. J. DeMott
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J. Fan
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A. N. Flores
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D. Gochis
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M. Grover
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T. C. J. Hill
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A. Hodshire
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E. Hulm
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C. C. Hume
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R. Jackson
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F. Junyent
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A. Kennedy
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M. Kumjian
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E. J. T. Levin
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J. D. Lundquist
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J. O’Brien
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M. S. Raleigh
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J. Reithel
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A. Rhoades
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K. Rittger
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W. Rudisill
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Z. Sherman
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E. Siirila-Woodburn
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S. M. Skiles
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J. N. Smith
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R. C. Sullivan
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A. Theisen
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M. Tuftedal
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A. C. Varble
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A. Wiedlea
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S. Wielandt
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K. Williams
, and
Z. Xu

Abstract

The science of mountainous hydrology spans the atmosphere through the bedrock and inherently crosses physical and disciplinary boundaries: land–atmosphere interactions in complex terrain enhance clouds and precipitation, while watersheds retain and release water over a large range of spatial and temporal scales. Limited observations in complex terrain challenge efforts to improve predictive models of the hydrology in the face of rapid changes. The Upper Colorado River exemplifies these challenges, especially with ongoing mismatches between precipitation, snowpack, and discharge. Consequently, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) user facility has deployed an observatory to the East River Watershed near Crested Butte, Colorado, between September 2021 and June 2023 to measure the main atmospheric drivers of water resources, including precipitation, clouds, winds, aerosols, radiation, temperature, and humidity. This effort, called the Surface Atmosphere Integrated Field Laboratory (SAIL), is also working in tandem with DOE-sponsored surface and subsurface hydrologists and other federal, state, and local partners. SAIL data can be benchmarks for model development by producing a wide range of observational information on precipitation and its associated processes, including those processes that impact snowpack sublimation and redistribution, aerosol direct radiative effects in the atmosphere and in the snowpack, aerosol impacts on clouds and precipitation, and processes controlling surface fluxes of energy and mass. Preliminary data from SAIL’s first year showcase the rich information content in SAIL’s many datastreams and support testing hypotheses that will ultimately improve scientific understanding and predictability of Upper Colorado River hydrology in 2023 and beyond.

Open access
J. Vilà-Guerau de Arellano
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O. K. Hartogensis
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H. de Boer
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R. Moonen
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R. González-Armas
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M. Janssens
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G. A. Adnew
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D. J. Bonell-Fontás
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S. Botía
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S. P. Jones
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H. van Asperen
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S. Komiya
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V. S. de Feiter
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D. Rikkers
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S. de Haas
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L. A. T. Machado
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C. Q. Dias-Junior
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G. Giovanelli-Haytzmann
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W. I. D. Valenti
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R. C. Figueiredo
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C. S. Farias
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D. H. Hall
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A. C. S. Mendonça
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F. A. G. da Silva
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J. L. Marton da Silva
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R. Souza
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G. Martins
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J. N. Miller
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W. B. Mol
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B. Heusinkveld
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C. C. van Heerwaarden
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F. A. F. D’Oliveira
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R. Rodrigues Ferreira
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R. Acosta Gotuzzo
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G. Pugliese
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J. Williams
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A. Ringsdorf
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A. Edtbauer
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C. A. Quesada
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B. Takeshi Tanaka Portela
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E. Gomes Alves
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C. Pöhlker
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S. Trumbore
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J. Lelieveld
, and
T. Röckmann

Abstract

How are rainforest photosynthesis and turbulent fluxes influenced by clouds? To what extent are clouds affected by local processes driven by rainforest energy, water and carbon fluxes? These interrelated questions were the main drivers of the intensive field experiment CloudRoots-Amazon22 which took place at the ATTO/Campina supersites in the Amazon rainforest during the dry season, in August 2022. CloudRoots-Amazon22 collected observational data to derive cause-effect relationships between processes occurring at the leaf-level up to canopy scales in relation to the diurnal evolution of the clear-to-cloudy transition. First, we studied the impact of cloud and canopy radiation perturbations on the sub-diurnal variability of stomatal conductance. Stoma opening is larger in the morning, modulated by the cloud optical thickness. Second, we combined 1 Hz-frequency measurements of the stable isotopologues of carbon dioxide and water vapor with measurements of turbulence to determine carbon dioxide and water vapor sources and sinks within the canopy. Using scintillometer observations, we inferred 1-minute sensible heat flux that responded within minutes to the cloud passages. Third, collocated profiles of state variables and greenhouse gases enabled us to determine the role of clouds in vertical transport. We then inferred, using canopy and upper-atmospheric observations and a parameterization, the cloud cover and cloud mass flux to establish causality between canopy and cloud processes. This shows the need of comprehensive observational set to improve weather and climate model representations. Our findings contribute to advance our knowledge of the coupling between cloudy boundary layers and primary carbon productivity of the Amazon rainforest.

Open access
G. de Boer
,
C. Diehl
,
J. Jacob
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A. Houston
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S. W. Smith
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P. Chilson
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D. G. Schmale III
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J. Intrieri
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J. Pinto
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J. Elston
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D. Brus
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O. Kemppinen
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A. Clark
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D. Lawrence
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S. C. C. Bailey
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M.P. Sama
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A. Frazier
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C. Crick
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V. Natalie
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E. Pillar-Little
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P. Klein
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S. Waugh
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J. K. Lundquist
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L. Barbieri
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S. T. Kral
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A. A. Jensen
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C. Dixon
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S. Borenstein
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D. Hesselius
,
K. Human
,
P. Hall
,
B. Argrow
,
T. Thornberry
,
R. Wright
, and
J. T. Kelly
Full access
Greg M. McFarquhar
,
Elizabeth Smith
,
Elizabeth A. Pillar-Little
,
Keith Brewster
,
Phillip B. Chilson
,
Temple R. Lee
,
Sean Waugh
,
Nusrat Yussouf
,
Xuguang Wang
,
Ming Xue
,
Gijs de Boer
,
Jeremy A. Gibbs
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Chris Fiebrich
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Bruce Baker
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Jerry Brotzge
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Frederick Carr
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Hui Christophersen
,
Martin Fengler
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Philip Hall
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Terry Hock
,
Adam Houston
,
Robert Huck
,
Jamey Jacob
,
Robert Palmer
,
Patricia K. Quinn
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Melissa Wagner
,
Yan (Rockee) Zhang
, and
Darren Hawk
Free access
Taneil Uttal
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Sandra Starkweather
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James R. Drummond
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Timo Vihma
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Alexander P. Makshtas
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Lisa S. Darby
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John F. Burkhart
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Christopher J. Cox
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Lauren N. Schmeisser
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Thomas Haiden
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Marion Maturilli
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Matthew D. Shupe
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Gijs De Boer
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Auromeet Saha
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Andrey A. Grachev
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Sara M. Crepinsek
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Lori Bruhwiler
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Barry Goodison
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Bruce McArthur
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Von P. Walden
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Edward J. Dlugokencky
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P. Ola G. Persson
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Glen Lesins
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Tuomas Laurila
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John A. Ogren
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Robert Stone
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Charles N. Long
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Sangeeta Sharma
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Andreas Massling
,
David D. Turner
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Diane M. Stanitski
,
Eija Asmi
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Mika Aurela
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Henrik Skov
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Konstantinos Eleftheriadis
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Aki Virkkula
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Andrew Platt
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Eirik J. Førland
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Yoshihiro Iijima
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Ingeborg E. Nielsen
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Michael H. Bergin
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Lauren Candlish
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Nikita S. Zimov
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Sergey A. Zimov
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Norman T. O’Neill
,
Pierre F. Fogal
,
Rigel Kivi
,
Elena A. Konopleva-Akish
,
Johannes Verlinde
,
Vasily Y. Kustov
,
Brian Vasel
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Viktor M. Ivakhov
,
Yrjö Viisanen
, and
Janet M. Intrieri

Abstract

International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) activities and partnerships were initiated as a part of the 2007–09 International Polar Year (IPY) and are expected to continue for many decades as a legacy program. The IASOA focus is on coordinating intensive measurements of the Arctic atmosphere collected in the United States, Canada, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland to create synthesis science that leads to an understanding of why and not just how the Arctic atmosphere is evolving. The IASOA premise is that there are limitations with Arctic modeling and satellite observations that can only be addressed with boots-on-the-ground, in situ observations and that the potential of combining individual station and network measurements into an integrated observing system is tremendous. The IASOA vision is that by further integrating with other network observing programs focusing on hydrology, glaciology, oceanography, terrestrial, and biological systems it will be possible to understand the mechanisms of the entire Arctic system, perhaps well enough for humans to mitigate undesirable variations and adapt to inevitable change.

Full access