Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for :

  • Author or Editor: Robert Ferraro x
  • Journal of Hydrometeorology x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Baijun Tian, Huikyo Lee, Duane E. Waliser, Robert Ferraro, Jinwon Kim, Jonathan Case, Takamichi Iguchi, Eric Kemp, Di Wu, William Putman, and Weile Wang

Abstract

Several dynamically downscaled climate simulations with various spatial resolutions (24, 12, and 4 km) and spectral nudging strengths (0, 600, and 2000 km) have been run over the contiguous United States from 2000 to 2009 using the high-resolution NASA Unified Weather and Research Forecasting (NU-WRF) regional model initialized and constrained by the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, version 2 (MERRA-2). This paper summarizes the authors’ efforts on the development of a model performance metric and its application to assess summer precipitation over the U.S. Great Plains (USGP) in these downscaled climate simulations. A new model performance metric T was first developed that uses both the linear correlation coefficient and mean square error and is consistent with other commonly used metrics, but gives a bigger separation between good and bad simulations. This metric T was then applied to the summer mean precipitation spatial pattern, diurnal Hovmöller diagram, and diurnal spatial pattern over the USGP from the simulations focusing on the summer precipitation diurnal cycle related to mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). The metric T skill scores increase significantly from the control simulation to the nudged simulations and from the nudged simulations with shorter wavelengths to the nudged simulations with longer wavelengths, but do not change much from MERRA-2 to the downscaled simulations or between the various downscaled simulations with different spatial resolutions. Thus, there is some credibility, but no significant value added compared to MERRA-2, of the downscaled climate simulations of the summer precipitation over the USGP.

Full access
Takamichi Iguchi, Wei-Kuo Tao, Di Wu, Christa Peters-Lidard, Joseph A. Santanello, Eric Kemp, Yudong Tian, Jonathan Case, Weile Wang, Robert Ferraro, Duane Waliser, Jinwon Kim, Huikyo Lee, Bin Guan, Baijun Tian, and Paul Loikith

Abstract

This study investigates the sensitivity of daily rainfall rates in regional seasonal simulations over the contiguous United States (CONUS) to different cumulus parameterization schemes. Daily rainfall fields were simulated at 24-km resolution using the NASA-Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) Model for June–August 2000. Four cumulus parameterization schemes and two options for shallow cumulus components in a specific scheme were tested. The spread in the domain-mean rainfall rates across the parameterization schemes was generally consistent between the entire CONUS and most subregions. The selection of the shallow cumulus component in a specific scheme had more impact than that of the four cumulus parameterization schemes. Regional variability in the performance of each scheme was assessed by calculating optimally weighted ensembles that minimize full root-mean-square errors against reference datasets. The spatial pattern of the seasonally averaged rainfall was insensitive to the selection of cumulus parameterization over mountainous regions because of the topographical pattern constraint, so that the simulation errors were mostly attributed to the overall bias there. In contrast, the spatial patterns over the Great Plains regions as well as the temporal variation over most parts of the CONUS were relatively sensitive to cumulus parameterization selection. Overall, adopting a single simulation result was preferable to generating a better ensemble for the seasonally averaged daily rainfall simulation, as long as their overall biases had the same positive or negative sign. However, an ensemble of multiple simulation results was more effective in reducing errors in the case of also considering temporal variation.

Full access
Robert F. Adler, George J. Huffman, Alfred Chang, Ralph Ferraro, Ping-Ping Xie, John Janowiak, Bruno Rudolf, Udo Schneider, Scott Curtis, David Bolvin, Arnold Gruber, Joel Susskind, Philip Arkin, and Eric Nelkin

Abstract

The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Version-2 Monthly Precipitation Analysis is described. This globally complete, monthly analysis of surface precipitation at 2.5° latitude × 2.5° longitude resolution is available from January 1979 to the present. It is a merged analysis that incorporates precipitation estimates from low-orbit satellite microwave data, geosynchronous-orbit satellite infrared data, and surface rain gauge observations. The merging approach utilizes the higher accuracy of the low-orbit microwave observations to calibrate, or adjust, the more frequent geosynchronous infrared observations. The dataset is extended back into the premicrowave era (before mid-1987) by using infrared-only observations calibrated to the microwave-based analysis of the later years. The combined satellite-based product is adjusted by the rain gauge analysis. The dataset archive also contains the individual input fields, a combined satellite estimate, and error estimates for each field. This monthly analysis is the foundation for the GPCP suite of products, including those at finer temporal resolution. The 23-yr GPCP climatology is characterized, along with time and space variations of precipitation.

Full access