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THE WEATHER AND CIRCULATION OF JUNE 1963

Interplay Between Blocking and Drought in the United States

ROBERT R. DICKSON

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Robert R. Dickson

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Robert R. Dickson

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WEATI-IER AND CIRCULATION OF AUGUST 1974

Relief from Heat and Drought in the Central United States

Robert R. Dickson

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WEATHER AND CIRCULATION OF AUGUST 1975

Record Rainfall Over the Central Great Lakes

Robert R. Dickson

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Robert R. Dickson

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Robert R. Dickson

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Robert R. Dickson

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Satellite-augmented observations of tropical storm and hurricane frequencies in the southeastern North Pacific during recent Augusts (1966–1974) were compared to various environmental factors. On a regional scale, a relatively strong mean 700 mb ridge from the Gulf of Mexico to Baja California was found to accompany high storm frequency. The linear correlation coefficient between storm frequency and a measure of the strength of this ridge amounted to 0.77. On a larger scale, the 700 mb Subtropical Westerlies Index (20°N to 35°N) for west longitudes from 0° to 180° had a somewhat stronger relation to storm frequency (r=0.86). Average August sea surface temperature in the vicinity of storm formation was poorly correlated with storm frequency. This suggests that the unfailingly warm August water temperatures in this area— always exceeding 27°F—were not a limiting factor in storm development.

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Robert R. Dickson

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Monthly values of the anomaly of percent possible sunshine at 21 locations in the United States were related to the field of monthly mean 700 mb height anomaly by correlation and regression analysis. Data were generally for the 1950–69 period, grouped by seasons. Reduction in variance afforded by the derived multiple linear regression equations, averaged over all locations and seasons, was 0.47 for the development data sample. In general, results were best over the western half of the nation and poorest along the eastern seaboard. Correlation fields and multiple linear regression equations relating percent possible sunshine at Memphis, Tenn., to the field of monthly mean 700 mb height anomaly are discussed in detail.

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Robert R. Dickson

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