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  • Author or Editor: S. K. Kao x
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S-K. Kao

Abstract

An analysis of the wavenumber-frequency spectra of temperature in the free atmosphere is made. It is found that a striking similarity exists between the spectrum of temperature and that of the large-scale wind velocity in the free atmosphere. The wavenumber-frequency spectrum of temperature shows a preferred spectral domain of wave activities, oriented primarily from a region of low wavenumbers and low frequencies to a region of high wavenumbers and negative frequencies assigned to waves moving from west to east. In the high-wavenumber range, the wavenumber spectrum of temperature is approximately proportional to the –3 power of the wavenumber. In the high-frequency range, the frequency spectrum of temperature is approximately proportional to the –1 power of the frequency. These indicate that the structure of the temperature field in the free atmosphere is essentially affected by the large-scale two-dimensional turbulent motion. It is also found that most of the sensible heat is associated with the stationary zonal mean motion, and that there is more sensible heat associated with nonstationary waves than with stationary waves in the atmosphere.

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S-K. Kao

Abstract

The governing equations, power and cross spectra for the atmospheric motion, and transports in the frequency, wave-number space are derived. Discussions are made of the contributions of the nonlinear interactions of atmospheric waves in velocity and temperature fields to the conversion of kinetic and potential energies, and to the meridional transports of angular momentum and sensible heat in the atmosphere.

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S-K. Kao

Abstract

An analysis of the kinetics and dynamics of the relative dispersion of particles in a stratified rotating fluid is made. The expressions for the relative displacement tensor, and the power- and cross-spectra of the relative velocity are derived. Their characteristics for large and small diffusion times are examined. The governing equations for the motion of marked fluid particles are separated into two sets of equations, one governing the motion of the center of mass and the other governing the motion of individual particles relative to the center of mass. Discussions of the concentration distribution in clusters of marked fluid particles are made. A turbulent diffusion model is constructed for the estimate of the effects of thermal stratification and rotation on the dispersion of particles in the atmosphere.

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S-K. Kao

Abstract

The properties of the volume integral of momentum vorticity are examined. These results are applied to the study of the maintenance of zonal circulation of a polar cap. It is shown that the rate of change of the vertical component of relative momentum vorticity is mainly due to (1) the effect of the convergence of meridional flux of angular momentum and its lateral boundary surface, (2) the frictional force at the earth's surface, and (3) the action of the mountains on the atmosphere. A model for the mean state of the atmosphere in the northern hemisphere, based on the distribution of the mean surface zonal wind, is studied; and the maintenance of the zonal circulation is discussed on the basis of the meridional transports of both angular momentum and momentum vorticity. It is shown that in the middle latitudes the meridional transfer of momentum vorticity is directed toward the north pole, whereas in the lower latitudes, as well as in the polar region, the transport is directed toward the equator. These results agree with the mean meridional transport of momentum vorticity in the month of January 1949, computed from the geostrophic winds.

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S-K. Kao

Abstract

A theoretical model is constructed and tested for the analysis and prediction of radioactive concentration in the troposphere. It is found that turbulent motion near the jet core plays the major role in the transport of radioactive debris from the stratosphere into the troposphere, whereas the mean motion of the jet core contributes to the spring maximum and autumn minimum of the concentration. A semiannual period in the variation of concentration exists, resulting from the interaction between the meridional gradient of the mean concentration and the mean motion of the jet core. It is also found that the average value of the vertical component of the eddy diffusivity in the troposphere is about 107 cm2 sec−1, and that the time required for diffusing radioactive particles from the tropopause level to the surface of the earth is about 11 hours.

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S-K. Kao
and
William R. Hill

Abstract

An analysis of the Eulerian and Lagrangian velocities at the 200-mb level in the Southern Hemisphere is made. It is found that: 1) the zonal component of the eddy diffusivity in the mid-atmosphere in the Southern Hemisphere is about 50% greater than that in the Northern, whereas the meridional component of the eddy diffusivity in the Southern Hemisphere is about 50% smaller than that in the Northern; 2) the coefficient for the Eulerian-Lagrangian time-scale transformation in the Southern Hemisphere is about 0.6 which is of the same order of magnitude as that in the Northern; 3) the autocorrelation functions and energy spectra of the Eulerian and Lagrangian velocities in the Southern Hemisphere are similar to those in the Northern; and 4) the peak of the energy spectrum of the meridional component of the Lagrangian velocity in the Southern Hemisphere occurs near the frequency 1.8 × 10−2 cycle hr−1, about the same as that in the Northern.

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S-K. Kao
and
Larry L. Wendell

Abstract

The wavenumber-frequency spectra of the kinetic energy of the zonal and meridional components of the motion at 100, 200 and 500 mb, at 20, 40, 60 and 8ON, show a definite spectral domain of wave activities in the atmosphere. In middle latitudes, the spectral domain is oriented from a region of low wavenumbers and low frequencies to a region of high wavenumbers and negative frequencies designated for waves moving from west to east. In high latitudes, the domain of wave activities is confined to a region of low wavenumbers and low frequencies. In low latitudes, however, there exist two domains, one similar to that in the middle latitude and the other occurring in a narrow band centered near zero frequency in the medium wavenumber range.

The frequency spectra of the kinetic energy of the zonal motion show similar distributions at all levels and seasons, and are approximately proportional to the minus first power of the frequency in low latitudes but are proportional to the minus second power of the frequency in high latitudes. The wavenumber spectra of the zonal motion a1so show similar distributions at all levels and seasons, and are approximately proportional to the minus third power of the wavenumber in the high wavenumber range. The wavenumber spectra of the meridional motion show an energy peak in the wavenumber range k = 4–10. Again, in the high wavenumber range, the power spectra of the meridional motion are approximately proportional to the minus third power of the wavenumber.

The mean kinetic energy of the zonal motion shows a maximum near 4ON at all levels and seasons, except at 100 mb in the summer where it occurs near 20N. The distribution of the mean kinetic energy of the moving waves indicates a definite shift in the region of wave activities with height; the maximum wave activity occurs near 60N in the troposphere, near 4ON at the tropopause level, and near 6ON in the stratosphere. In winter, the mean kinetic energy of the meridional motion shows a great deal of energy in high latitudes, caused primarily by the winter instability of the polar vortex in the stratosphere.

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S-K. Kao
and
David C. Powell

Abstract

The characteristics of the large-scale relative particle displacement tensor, the correlation functions, and spectra of the relative particle velocities at 10-, 30-, 50- and 100-mb levels are investigated; pertinent results concerning relative turbulence and diffusion at various levels in both troposphere and stratosphere are discussed and summarized. It is found that a quasi-stationary process exists in the large-scale turbulence diffusion in both the troposphere and stratosphere, the rate of relative particle dispersion being greatest in the tropopause level and generally proportional to the variance of the relative velocity. In general, the auto-correlation functions for the relative zonal velocities in both the troposphere and stratosphere behave like an exponentially decreasing function, whereas those for the relative meridional velocities shows a combination of an exponential function and a cosine function with a damping amplitude. The power spectra of the relative zonal velocities at all levels show the similar characteristics of increasing kinetic energy with decreasing frequency, whereas those of the relative meridional velocities show an energy peak near the frequency of 10−2 cycles hr−1. The high frequency portion of the power spectra of both the zonal and meridional components of the relative velocities at all levels is found to be proportional to the minus third power of the frequency. The principal axis of the large-scale turbulent diffusion in the stratosphere is generally oriented ENE-WSW, whereas in the troposphere it is ESE-WNW.

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S. K. Kao
and
H. N. Lee

Abstract

An analysis of the linear and nonlinear interactions of atmospheric motion in the wavenumber-frequency domain indicates that the kinetic energy of the large-scale moving waves is essentially maintained by the nonlinear interactions and the pressure force. In middle latitudes where an eastward mean zonal flow prevails, the supply of kinetic energy to eastward moving waves through the nonlinear interactions is greater than the extraction of kinetic energy through the pressure force, whereas the supply of kinetic energy to westward moving waves through the pressure force is greater than the extraction of kinetic energy through the nonlinear interactions. Near the equator where a weak westward mean zonal Row occurs, the non-linear interactions generally extract kinetic energy from the eastward moving waves, but supply kinetic energy to the westward moving waves; the pressure force, however, supplies kinetic energy to both eastward and westward moving waves.

The primary contribution of the nonlinear interactions to the energy transfer in wavenumber-frequency domain is essentially through the interactions of the slowly moving waves, the stationary long waves and the zonal mean flow. The interactions between the stationary long waves and waves moving in the same (opposite) direction of the mean zonal flow generally extract (supply) kinetic energy from (to) the moving waves, whereas the interactions between the mean zonal flow and waves moving in the same (opposite) direction of the zonal flow generally supply (extract) kinetic energy to (from) the moving waves.

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S. K. Kao
and
C. N. Chi

Abstract

An analysis of the forces and motion at 500 mb, between 30 and 60°N, in wavenumber-frequency domain, indicates that there exist definite cycles in the generation, transport and dissipation of the kinetic and available potential energies associated with long- and synoptic-scale waves. The growth and decay of the kinetic energy of long- and synoptic-scale waves are primarily controlled by the transport of kinetic energy to and from the waves through the nonlinear wave interactions, while the contribution to the kinetic energy through energy conversion tends to balance the effects of the Reynolds and frictional stresses. The evolution of the available potential energy associated with the long and synoptic waves is essentially the consequence of the transfer of thermal energy to and from the wave through the interaction between the velocity and temperature waves, while the transfer of thermal energy through the interactions between the velocity waves and the gradient of the zonal mean temperature tends to balance the effects of diabatic heating or cooling and energy conversion. The growth and decay of the kinetic energy of the zonal flow are primarily the result of the interaction between the velocity waves and the gradient of the mean zonal velocity, while the energy conversion from available potential to kinetic energy tends to balance the effects of the Reynolds and frictional stresses. The evolution of available potential energy associated with the zonal flow is essentially controlled by the interaction between the velocity waves and the gradient of the zonal mean temperature, while the effect of diabatic heating tends to balance the effect of energy conversion between the kinetic and available potential energies.

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