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Burkely T. Gallo
,
Adam J. Clark
, and
Scott R. Dembek
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Burkely T. Gallo
,
Adam J. Clark
, and
Scott R. Dembek

Abstract

Hourly maximum fields of simulated storm diagnostics from experimental versions of convection-permitting models (CPMs) provide valuable information regarding severe weather potential. While past studies have focused on predicting any type of severe weather, this study uses a CPM-based Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model ensemble initialized daily at the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) to derive tornado probabilities using a combination of simulated storm diagnostics and environmental parameters. Daily probabilistic tornado forecasts are developed from the NSSL-WRF ensemble using updraft helicity (UH) as a tornado proxy. The UH fields are combined with simulated environmental fields such as lifted condensation level (LCL) height, most unstable and surface-based CAPE (MUCAPE and SBCAPE, respectively), and multifield severe weather parameters such as the significant tornado parameter (STP). Varying thresholds of 2–5-km updraft helicity were tested with differing values of σ in the Gaussian smoother that was used to derive forecast probabilities, as well as different environmental information, with the aim of maximizing both forecast skill and reliability. The addition of environmental information improved the reliability and the critical success index (CSI) while slightly degrading the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve across all UH thresholds and σ values. The probabilities accurately reflected the location of tornado reports, and three case studies demonstrate value to forecasters. Based on initial tests, four sets of tornado probabilities were chosen for evaluation by participants in the 2015 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Hazardous Weather Testbed Spring Forecasting Experiment from 4 May to 5 June 2015. Participants found the probabilities useful and noted an overforecasting tendency.

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Rebecca D. Adams-Selin
,
Adam J. Clark
,
Christopher J. Melick
,
Scott R. Dembek
,
Israel L. Jirak
, and
Conrad L. Ziegler

Abstract

Four different versions of the HAILCAST hail model have been tested as part of the 2014–16 NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT) Spring Forecasting Experiments. HAILCAST was run as part of the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) WRF Ensemble during 2014–16 and the Community Leveraged Unified Ensemble (CLUE) in 2016. Objective verification using the Multi-Radar Multi-Sensor maximum expected size of hail (MRMS MESH) product was conducted using both object-based and neighborhood grid-based verification. Subjective verification and feedback was provided by HWT participants. Hourly maximum storm surrogate fields at a variety of thresholds and Storm Prediction Center (SPC) convective outlooks were also evaluated for comparison. HAILCAST was found to improve with each version due to feedback from the 2014–16 HWTs. The 2016 version of HAILCAST was equivalent to or exceeded the skill of the tested storm surrogates across a variety of thresholds. The post-2016 version of HAILCAST was found to improve 50-mm hail forecasts through object-based verification, but 25-mm hail forecasting ability declined as measured through neighborhood grid-based verification. The skill of the storm surrogate fields varied widely as the threshold values used to determine hail size were varied. HAILCAST was found not to require such tuning, as it produced consistent results even when used across different model configurations and horizontal grid spacings. Additionally, different storm surrogate fields performed at varying levels of skill when forecasting 25- versus 50-mm hail, hinting at the different convective modes typically associated with small versus large sizes of hail. HAILCAST was able to match results relatively consistently with the best-performing storm surrogate field across multiple hail size thresholds.

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Burkely T. Gallo
,
Adam J. Clark
,
Bryan T. Smith
,
Richard L. Thompson
,
Israel Jirak
, and
Scott R. Dembek

Abstract

Probabilistic ensemble-derived tornado forecasts generated from convection-allowing models often use hourly maximum updraft helicity (UH) alone or in combination with environmental parameters as a proxy for right-moving (RM) supercells. However, when UH occurrence is a condition for tornado probability generation, false alarm areas can occur from UH swaths associated with nocturnal mesoscale convective systems, which climatologically produce fewer tornadoes than RM supercells. This study incorporates UH timing information with the forecast near-storm significant tornado parameter (STP) to calibrate the forecast tornado probability. To generate the probabilistic forecasts, three sets of observed climatological tornado frequencies given an RM supercell and STP value are incorporated with the model output, two of which use UH timing information. One method uses the observed climatological tornado frequency for a given 3-h window to generate the probabilities. Another normalizes the observed climatological tornado frequency by the number of hail, wind, and tornado reports observed in that 3-h window compared to the maximum number of reports in any 3-h window. The final method is independent of when UH occurs and uses the observed climatological tornado frequency encompassing all hours. The normalized probabilities reduce the false alarm area compared to the other methods but have a smaller area under the ROC curve and require a much higher percentile of the STP distribution to be used in probability generation to become reliable. Case studies demonstrate that the normalized probabilities highlight the most likely area for evening RM supercellular tornadoes, decreasing the nocturnal false alarm by assuming a linear convective mode.

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Burkely T. Gallo
,
Adam J. Clark
,
Bryan T. Smith
,
Richard L. Thompson
,
Israel Jirak
, and
Scott R. Dembek

Abstract

Attempts at probabilistic tornado forecasting using convection-allowing models (CAMs) have thus far used CAM attribute [e.g., hourly maximum 2–5-km updraft helicity (UH)] thresholds, treating them as binary events—either a grid point exceeds a given threshold or it does not. This study approaches these attributes probabilistically, using empirical observations of storm environment attributes and the subsequent climatological tornado occurrence frequency to assign a probability that a point will be within 40 km of a tornado, given the model-derived storm environment attributes. Combining empirical frequencies and forecast attributes produces better forecasts than solely using mid- or low-level UH, even if the UH is filtered using environmental parameter thresholds. Empirical tornado frequencies were derived using severe right-moving supercellular storms associated with a local storm report (LSR) of a tornado, severe wind, or severe hail for a given significant tornado parameter (STP) value from Storm Prediction Center (SPC) mesoanalysis grids in 2014–15. The NSSL–WRF ensemble produced the forecast STP values and simulated right-moving supercells, which were identified using a UH exceedance threshold. Model-derived probabilities are verified using tornado segment data from just right-moving supercells and from all tornadoes, as are the SPC-issued 0600 UTC tornado probabilities from the initial day 1 forecast valid 1200–1159 UTC the following day. The STP-based probabilistic forecasts perform comparably to SPC tornado probability forecasts in many skill metrics (e.g., reliability) and thus could be used as first-guess forecasts. Comparison with prior methodologies shows that probabilistic environmental information improves CAM-based tornado forecasts.

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John S. Kain
,
Scott R. Dembek
,
Steven J. Weiss
,
Jonathan L. Case
,
Jason J. Levit
, and
Ryan A. Sobash

Abstract

A new strategy for generating and presenting model diagnostic fields from convection-allowing forecast models is introduced. The fields are produced by computing temporal-maximum values for selected diagnostics at each horizontal grid point between scheduled output times. The two-dimensional arrays containing these maximum values are saved at the scheduled output times. The additional fields have minimal impacts on the size of the output files and the computation of most diagnostic quantities can be done very efficiently during integration of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model. Results show that these unique output fields facilitate the examination of features associated with convective storms, which can change dramatically within typical output intervals of 1–3 h.

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