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Robert J. Trapp
,
David J. Stensrud
,
Michael C. Coniglio
,
Russ S. Schumacher
,
Michael E. Baldwin
,
Sean Waugh
, and
Don T. Conlee

Abstract

The Mesoscale Predictability Experiment (MPEX) was a field campaign conducted 15 May through 15 June 2013 within the Great Plains region of the United States. One of the research foci of MPEX regarded the upscaling effects of deep convective storms on their environment, and how these feed back to the convective-scale dynamics and predictability. Balloon-borne GPS radiosondes, or “upsondes,” were used to sample such environmental feedbacks. Two of the upsonde teams employed dual-frequency sounding systems that allowed for upsonde observations at intervals as fast as 15 min. Because these dual-frequency systems also had the capacity for full mobility during sonde reception, highly adaptive and rapid storm-relative sampling of the convectively modified environment was possible. This article documents the mobile sounding capabilities and unique sampling strategies employed during MPEX.

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Paul W. Staten
,
Kevin M. Grise
,
Sean M. Davis
,
Kristopher B. Karnauskas
,
Darryn W. Waugh
,
Amanda C. Maycock
,
Qiang Fu
,
Kerry Cook
,
Ori Adam
,
Isla R. Simpson
,
Robert J Allen
,
Karen Rosenlof
,
Gang Chen
,
Caroline C. Ummenhofer
,
Xiao-Wei Quan
,
James P. Kossin
,
Nicholas A. Davis
, and
Seok-Woo Son

Abstract

Over the past 15 years, numerous studies have suggested that the sinking branches of Earth’s Hadley circulation and the associated subtropical dry zones have shifted poleward over the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. Early estimates of this tropical widening from satellite observations and reanalyses varied from 0.25° to 3° latitude per decade, while estimates from global climate models show widening at the lower end of the observed range. In 2016, two working groups, the U.S. Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) working group on the Changing Width of the Tropical Belt and the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) Tropical Width Diagnostics Intercomparison Project, were formed to synthesize current understanding of the magnitude, causes, and impacts of the recent tropical widening evident in observations. These working groups concluded that the large rates of observed tropical widening noted by earlier studies resulted from their use of metrics that poorly capture changes in the Hadley circulation, or from the use of reanalyses that contained spurious trends. Accounting for these issues reduces the range of observed expansion rates to 0.25°–0.5° latitude decade‒1—within the range from model simulations. Models indicate that most of the recent Northern Hemisphere tropical widening is consistent with natural variability, whereas increasing greenhouse gases and decreasing stratospheric ozone likely played an important role in Southern Hemisphere widening. Whatever the cause or rate of expansion, understanding the regional impacts of tropical widening requires additional work, as different forcings can produce different regional patterns of widening.

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