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  • Author or Editor: Wei Wang x
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Wei Wang and Eric Gill

Abstract

This paper presents a comparative study of high-resolution methods for high-frequency radar current mapping. A z-domain transformation and auxiliary z-domain manipulation of the autoregressive method is proposed for this comparison. A Weibull distribution test is recommended to justify the Rayleigh distribution of the sea clutter for quality control. Upon the power spectrum estimation, a conventional centroid method and a new symmetric-peak-sum method for the identification of current Doppler shift are proposed as another comparison. HF radar data were collected over the period from November 2012 to August 2013 at Placentia Bay, Newfoundland, Canada, and were compared with measurements from an acoustic Doppler current meter. This comparison is used to study the utility of high-resolution spectrum estimation and Bragg identification methods for surface current mapping. Results show promising use of these methods in different current scenarios and suggest combined applications to improve accuracy.

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Wei Wang and Eric W. Gill

Abstract

The errors in the current radial velocity measurements are examined using Bartlett beamforming and Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) direction-finding algorithms with a linear phased array antenna system. A variety of radar and environmental parameters are examined. Suggestions for the optimal choice of operating parameters are proposed. The MUSIC algorithm has shown promising performance in current measurement when beamforming is used to first establish the maximum current velocity. Comparisons of radar field data and current meter measurements show RMS radial velocity differences in magnitude of 7.44 and 6.64 cm s−1 for the Bartlett beamforming and MUSIC–Bartlett algorithms, respectively. The results indicate that there are advantages to using a MUSIC–Bartlett approach in operational applications.

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Zhan Lian, Baonan Sun, Zexun Wei, Yonggang Wang, and Xinyi Wang

Abstract

Numerous oceanic mesoscale eddies occur in the South China Sea (SCS). The present study employs eight automatic eddy detection algorithms to identify these mesoscale eddies and compares the results. Eddy probabilities and areas detected by various algorithms differ substantially. Most regions of the SCS with a high discrepancy of eddy probabilities are those with few mesoscale eddies, except for the area west of the Luzon Strait, the area west of Luzon Island between 12° and 17°N, and the southernmost end of the SCS basin. They are primarily caused by strong interference, noncircular eddy shapes, and gentle sea level anomaly (SLA) gradients, respectively. The SLA, winding angle, and hybrid methods can easily detect the mesoscale eddies with wavelike features. The Okubo–Weiss (OW) and the spatially smoothed OW methods better identify grouping phenomena of mesoscale eddies in the SCS. Suggestions are presented on choosing suitable algorithms for studying mesoscale eddies in the SCS. No single algorithm is perfect for all research purposes. For different studies, the most suitable algorithm is different.

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Wei Li, Yuanfu Xie, Shiow-Ming Deng, and Qi Wang

Abstract

In recent years, the Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has developed a space and time mesoscale analysis system (STMAS), which is currently a sequential three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR) system and is developing into a sequential 4DVAR in the near future. It is implemented by using a multigrid method based on a variational approach to generate grid analyses. This study is to test how STMAS deals with 2D Doppler radar radial velocity and to what degree the 2D Doppler radar radial velocity can improve the conventional (in situ) observation analysis. Two idealized experiments and one experiment with real Doppler radar radial velocity data, handled by STMAS, demonstrated significant improvement of the conventional observation analysis. Because the radar radial wind data can provide additional wind information (even it is incomplete: e.g., missing tangential wind vector), the analyses by assimilating both radial wind data and conventional data showed better results than those by assimilating only conventional data. Especially in the case of sparse conventional data, radar radial wind data can provide significant information and improve the analyses considerably.

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Wei-Yu Chang, Tai-Chi Chen Wang, and Pay-Liam Lin

Abstract

The drop size distribution (DSD) and drop shape relation (DSR) characteristics that were observed by a ground-based 2D video disdrometer and retrieved from a C-band polarimetric radar in the typhoon systems during landfall in the western Pacific, near northern Taiwan, were analyzed. The evolution of the DSD and its relation with the vertical development of the reflectivity of two rainband cases are fully illustrated. Three different types of precipitation systems were classified—weak stratiform, stratiform, and convective—according to characteristics of the mass-weighted diameter Dm, the maximum diameter, and the vertical structure of reflectivity. Further study of the relationship between the height H of the 15-dBZ contour of the vertical reflectivity profile, surface reflectivity Z, and the mass-weighted diameter Dm showed that Dm increased with a corresponding increase in the system depth H and reflectivity Z.

An analysis of DSDs retrieved from the National Central University (NCU) C-band polarimetric radar and disdrometer in typhoon cases indicates that the DSDs from the typhoon systems on the ocean were mainly a maritime convective type. However, the DSDs collected over land tended to uniquely locate in between the continental and maritime clusters. The average mass-weighted diameter Dm was about 2 mm and the average logarithmic normalized intercept Nw was about 3.8 log10 mm−1 m−3 in typhoon cases. The unique terrain-influenced deep convective systems embedded in typhoons in northern Taiwan might be the reason for these characteristics.

The “effective DSR” of typhoon systems had an axis ratio similar to that found by E. A. Brandes et al. when the raindrops were less than 1.5 mm. Nevertheless, the axis ratio tended to be more spherical with drops greater than 1.5 mm and under higher horizontal winds (maximum wind speed less than 8 m s−1). A fourth-order fitting DSR was derived for typhoon systems and the value was also very close to the estimated DSR from the polarimetric measurements in Typhoon Saomai (2006).

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Zhou Shenghui, Wei Ming, Wang Lijun, Zhao Chang, and Zhang Mingxu

Abstract

The sensitivity of the ill-conditioned coefficient matrix (CM) and the size of the analysis volume on the retrieval accuracy in the volume velocity processing (VVP) method are analyzed. By estimating the upper limit of the retrieval error and analyzing the effects of neglected parameters on retrieval accuracy, the simplified wind model is found to decrease the difficulty in solving and stabilizing the retrieval results, even though model errors would be induced by neglecting partial parameters. Strong linear correlation among CM vectors would cause an ill-conditioned matrix when more parameters are selected. By using exact coordinate data and changing the size of the analysis volume, the variation of the condition number indicates that a large volume size decreases the condition number, and the decrease caused by increasing the number of volume gates is larger than that caused by increasing the sector width. Using the spread of errors in the solution, a demonstration using mathematical deduction is provided to explain how a large analysis volume can improve retrieval accuracy. A test with a uniform wind field is used to demonstrate these conclusions.

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Liming Wang, Xuhui Lee, Wei Wang, Xufeng Wang, Zhongwang Wei, Congsheng Fu, Yunqiu Gao, Ling Lu, Weimin Song, Peixi Su, and Guanghui Lin

Abstract

Open-path eddy covariance systems are widely used for measuring the CO2 flux between land and atmosphere. A common problem is that they often yield negative fluxes or physiologically unreasonable CO2 uptake fluxes in the nongrowing season under cold conditions. In this study, a meta-analysis was performed on the eddy flux data from 64 FLUXNET sites and the relationship between the observed CO2 flux and the sensible heat flux was analyzed. In theory, these two fluxes should be independent of each other in cold conditions (air temperature lower than 0°C) when photosynthesis is suppressed. However, the results show that a significant and negative linear relationship existed between these two fluxes at 37 of the sites. The mean linear slope value is −0.008 ± 0.001 µmol m−2 s−1 per W m−2 among the 64 sites analyzed. The slope value was not significantly different among the three gas analyzer models (LI-7500, LI-7500A, IRGASON/EC150) used at these sites, indicating that self-heating may not be the only reason for the apparent wintertime net CO2 uptake. These results suggest a systematic bias toward larger carbon uptakes in the FLUXNET sites that deploy open-path eddy covariance systems.

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Xidong Wang, Peter C. Chu, Guijun Han, Wei Li, Xuefeng Zhang, and Dong Li

Abstract

A new, fully conserved minimal adjustment scheme with temperature and salinity (T, S) coherency is presented for eliminating false static instability generated from analyzing and assimilating stable ocean (T, S) profiles data, that is, from generalized averaging over purely observed data (data analysis) or over modeled/observed data (data assimilation). This approach consists of a variational method with (a) fully (heat, salt, and potential energy) conserved conditions, (b) minimal adjustment, and (c) (T, S) coherency. Comparison with three existing schemes (minimal adjustment, conserved minimal adjustment, and convective adjustment) using observational profiles and a simple one-dimensional ocean mixed layer model shows the superiority of this new scheme.

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BINGTIAN LI, ZEXUN WEI, YONGGANG WANG, XINYU GUO, TENGFEI XU, and XIANQING LV

Abstract

An enhanced harmonic analysis (S_TIDE) approach is adopted to examine the seasonal variations of internal tidal amplitudes in the northern South China Sea (SCS). Results of idealized experiments reveal that the seasonality can be captured by S_TIDE. By applying S_TIDE to mooring data, observed seasonality of internal tidal amplitudes in the northern SCS are explored. Not diurnal and semidiurnal internal tides (ITs), but overtides and long-period constituents of ITs exhibit clear seasonal cycles. However, differences between amplitudes of the eastward velocity and the northward counterpart are evident for K1, M2 and MK3, which may be caused by the intensification of background currents. Amplitudes of those ITs are stronger at intersection time between spring and summer in the eastward direction, but weaker in the northward direction. EOF analysis reveals that modes of diurnal ITs are higher than those of seimidiurnal ITs, which induces relatively more complicated seasonal variations. In addition to intensification of background currents, influences of surface tides and stratification will also induce variations of internal tidal amplitudes, introducing tremendous difficulty in predicting variation trends of internal tidal amplitudes, which greatly reduces predictability of ITs.

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Shuo Ma, Wei Yan, Yunxian Huang, Jun Jiang, Shensen Hu, and Yingqiang Wang

Abstract

Many quantitative uses of the nighttime imagery provided by low-light sensors, such as the day–night band (DNB) on board the Suomi–National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP), have emerged recently. Owing to the low nighttime radiance, low-light calibration at night must be investigated in detail. Traditional vicarious calibration methods are based on some targets with nearly invariant surface properties under lunar illumination. However, the relatively stable light emissions may also be used to realize the radiometric calibration under low light. This paper presents a low-light calibration method based on bridge lights, and Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) DNB data are used to assess the proposed method. A comparison of DNB high-gain-stage (HGS) radiances over a 2-yr period from August 2012 to July 2014 demonstrates that the predictions are consistent with the observations, and the agreement between the predictions and the observations is on the order of −2.9% with an uncertainty of 9.3% (1σ) for the Hangzhou Bay Bridge and −3.9% with an uncertainty of 7.2% (1σ) for the Donghai Bridge. Such a calibration method based on stable light emissions has a wide application prospect for the calibration of low-light sensors at night.

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