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  • Author or Editor: William M. Lapenta x
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Deborah K. Nykanen
,
Efi Foufoula-Georgiou
, and
William M. Lapenta

Abstract

A coupled modeling framework is used in this study to investigate the effect of subgrid-scale rainfall variability on the spatial structure of the evolving storm and on other surface variables and water and energy fluxes. The Fifth-Generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model coupled with the Biosphere–Atmosphere Transfer Scheme is combined with a dynamical/statistical scheme for statistically downscaling rainfall. Model simulations with and without including subgrid-scale rainfall variability are compared at the grid scale to quantify the propagation of small-scale rainfall heterogeneities through the nonlinear land–atmosphere system. It was found that including subgrid-scale rainfall variability (here on the order of 3 km) affects the spatial organization of the storm system itself, surface temperature, soil moisture, and sensible and latent heat fluxes. These effects were found to occur at spatial scales much larger than the scale at which rainfall variability was prescribed, illustrating the pronounced nonlinear spatial dynamics of the land–atmosphere system and its important role on hydrometeorological predictions.

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Jonathan L. Case
,
William L. Crosson
,
Sujay V. Kumar
,
William M. Lapenta
, and
Christa D. Peters-Lidard

Abstract

This manuscript presents an assessment of daily regional simulations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) numerical weather prediction (NWP) model initialized with high-resolution land surface data from the NASA Land Information System (LIS) software versus a control WRF configuration that uses land surface data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Eta Model. The goal of this study is to investigate the potential benefits of using the LIS software to improve land surface initialization for regional NWP. Fifty-eight individual nested simulations were integrated for 24 h for both the control and experimental (LISWRF) configurations during May 2004 over Florida and the surrounding areas: 29 initialized at 0000 UTC and 29 initialized at 1200 UTC. The land surface initial conditions for the LISWRF runs came from an offline integration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) within LIS for two years prior to the beginning of the month-long study on an identical grid domain to the subsequent WRF simulations. Atmospheric variables used to force the offline Noah LSM integration were provided by the North American Land Data Assimilation System and Global Data Assimilation System gridded analyses.

The LISWRF soil states were generally cooler and drier than the NCEP Eta Model soil states during May 2004. Comparisons between the control and LISWRF runs for one event suggested that the LIS land surface initial conditions led to an improvement in the timing and evolution of a sea-breeze circulation over portions of northwestern Florida. Surface verification statistics for the entire month indicated that the LISWRF runs produced a more enhanced and accurate diurnal range in 2-m temperatures compared to the control as a result of the overall drier initial soil states, which resulted from a reduction in the nocturnal warm bias in conjunction with a reduction in the daytime cold bias. Daytime LISWRF 2-m dewpoints were correspondingly drier than the control dewpoints, again a manifestation of the drier initial soil states in LISWRF. The positive results of the LISWRF experiments help to illustrate the importance of initializing regional NWP models with high-quality land surface data generated at the same grid resolution.

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Christopher J. Anderson
,
Raymond W. Arritt
,
Zaitao Pan
,
Eugene S. Takle
,
William J. Gutowski Jr.
,
Francis O. Otieno
,
Renato da Silva
,
Daniel Caya
,
Jens H. Christensen
,
Daniel Lüthi
,
Miguel A. Gaertner
,
Clemente Gallardo
,
Filippo Giorgi
,
René Laprise
,
Song-You Hong
,
Colin Jones
,
H-M. H. Juang
,
J. J. Katzfey
,
John L. McGregor
,
William M. Lapenta
,
Jay W. Larson
,
John A. Taylor
,
Glen E. Liston
,
Roger A. Pielke Sr.
, and
John O. Roads

Abstract

Thirteen regional climate model (RCM) simulations of June–July 1993 were compared with each other and observations. Water vapor conservation and precipitation characteristics in each RCM were examined for a 10° × 10° subregion of the upper Mississippi River basin, containing the region of maximum 60-day accumulated precipitation in all RCMs and station reports.

All RCMs produced positive precipitation minus evapotranspiration (PE > 0), though most RCMs produced PE below the observed range. RCM recycling ratios were within the range estimated from observations. No evidence of common errors of E was found. In contrast, common dry bias of P was found in the simulations.

Daily cycles of terms in the water vapor conservation equation were qualitatively similar in most RCMs. Nocturnal maximums of P and C (convergence) occurred in 9 of 13 RCMs, consistent with observations. Three of the four driest simulations failed to couple P and C overnight, producing afternoon maximum P. Further, dry simulations tended to produce a larger fraction of their 60-day accumulated precipitation from low 3-h totals.

In station reports, accumulation from high (low) 3-h totals had a nocturnal (early morning) maximum. This time lag occurred, in part, because many mesoscale convective systems had reached peak intensity overnight and had declined in intensity by early morning. None of the RCMs contained such a time lag. It is recommended that short-period experiments be performed to examine the ability of RCMs to simulate mesoscale convective systems prior to generating long-period simulations for hydroclimatology.

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