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Eugene W. Bierly
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What the AMS Can Do for Science and Mathematics Education in the United States

Eugene W. Bierly
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Eugene W. Bierly
and
E. Wendell Hewson

Abstract

There are several restrictive meteorological conditions that are of great importance in the design of stacks. The conditions considered are fumigation, fumigation, aerodynamic downwash, looping and trapping. Each condition is explained and formulae are given for the computation of ground level concentrations. Methods for determining the percentage of occurrence of these restrictive conditions from observed data are also discussed very briefly.

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Eugene W. Bierly
and
Gerald C. Gill

Abstract

A technique for measuring atmospheric diffusion with a “floating grid” system is described. Tracer sampling is accomplished using one or two airplanes flying arcs of circles at selected radial distances from the release point and flying selected levels on each arc. The planes are guided by a ground based radar. The centerline of the “floating grid” sampling network is aligned in the direction toward which the mean wind is blowing and can change during an experiment. Instrumentation necessary for the dispensing, sampling and analysis of the tracer material is described as well as the associated meteorological instrumentation. A brief description of the analysis of data using the “floating grid” system is also presented.

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Eugene W. Bierly
and
E. Wendell Hewson

Abstract

Experiments designed to measure atmospheric diffusion in transitional states have been carried out for several years over the western end of Lake Erie. The concept of diffusion in transitional states, both in general and for such a shoreline location, is described. The methods of data analysis which have been used are explained and their advantages and limitations outlined. Results of the experiments are presented in terms of Sutton's parameters n, C z and C y are generally larger than those which have been measured over more uniform sites. One experiment is described in detail to illustrate diffusion in a trasitional state which was due to the advection of warm air aloft.

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Gerald C. Gill
and
Eugene W. Bierly

Abstract

The standard deviation of wind direction and the mean wind speed have been incorporated in to a system for controlling the release of radioactive gaseous wastes from the 200-ft stack of the Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant. The meteorological sensor used in the system is a Bendix-Friez Aerovane, located on top of a 100-ft meteorological tower near the stack. Data from the Aerovane are processed by a small analog computer whose outputs are displayed on the control board of the reactor control room and recorded on strip chart recorders. The display enables the reactor operator to know whether the stack is open to the atmosphere or whether the gases are being stored in containment tanks. Averaging times of the meteorological variables may be switched to 3, 6, 12 or 24 minute periods. The paper concludes with a discussion of several representative records from the computer and the Aerovane, pointing out some of the interesting features of this system.

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Gunter Weller
and
Eugene W. Bierly
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Eugene W. Bierly
and
John A. Mirabito

In 1972 the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. agreed to cooperate in the field of Environmental Protection. A part of this agreement involved the formation of Working Group VIII (WG VIII), which deals with the influence of the environment on climate. This mandate has been interpreted very broadly, resulting in a wide range of cooperative climate activities that have been addressed under the agreement. Details on the history, organization, and activities—past, present and future—are presented and discussed. Although this bilateral agreement predates the U.S. National Climate Program, its activities have been supplementary and complementary. Scientists interested in the activities of the climate working group are encouraged to participate.

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Gerald C. Gill
,
Eugene W. Bierly
, and
Jal N. Kerawalla

Abstract

An inexpensive, reusable, cold propellant (no fire) rocket has been adapted so a continuous smoke stream is emitted from the instant of launching to an altitude of 1200 ft. The smoke column is photographed simultaneously at 10-sec intervals by two cameras located 2000 ft from the launch site and at right angles to each other. Results are presented in terms of north–south and east–west components of the wind speed at any desired altitude to 1200 ft. A brief cost analysis is presented as evidence that the rocket technique is quite inexpensive relative to other systems in use today.

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Gerald C. Gill
,
Eugene W. Bierly
, and
Jal N. Kerawalla

Abstract

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